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NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | April 10, 1991
Services for Charles Thurgood Burns, chairman of the country's largest black-owned and operated supermarket chain, will be held at 7 p.m. Friday at the Morgan State University Christian Center, 4307 Hillen Road.Mr. Burns, who founded the Baltimore chain of Super Pride Markets and was a first cousin of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, died of a heart attack Sunday at his home in northern Baltimore County. He was 76.Born in Baltimore, Mr. Burns graduated from Morgan State College, where he played football for four years.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | July 31, 2014
Republican gubernatorial nominee Larry Hogan blamed Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown for Baltimore's "food deserts" Thursday, suggesting that the O'Malley-Brown administration's tax policies led the the recent demise of the Stop Shop Save grocery chain. In a statement released by the campaign, Hogan minimized the impact of Thursday's opening of a new, 67,000-foot ShopRite store in Howard Park. “ShopRite expanding in Baltimore is a good thing, but I would have hoped this major corporation would have chosen to locate in one of Baltimore City's food deserts where unemployment and poverty are far higher than the state average," Hogan said.
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NEWS
June 18, 1992
A fourth suspect in the robbery Monday of the Super Pride food market in Pimlico was arrested yesterday, police said.Gary Jenkins, 25, of the 200 block of Dallas Court, was arrested about 3 a.m. yesterday by members of the robbery squad.Mr. Jenkins was charged with armed robbery and conspiracy to commit robbery. He was being held at the Northwestern District lockup pending a bail hearing today.Police interrupted the robbery of the market in the 3700 block of W. Belvedere Ave. around 9:30 p.m. Monday and arrested Gary Milan McClone, 26, of the 5300 block of Beaufort Ave..
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Residents of one of Baltimore's many "food deserts" will gain more access to fresh meats and produce when what officials say is the city's largest grocery store opens Thursday in Howard Park. The 67,000-square-foot ShopRite store reflects a push to bring healthier food options to neighborhoods that have long been without a full-service food market. "When you have an environment that is lacking in fresh food options, it will be harder for you to be healthy," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
With an auction scheduled for Monday, Super Pride Markets has begun the process of satisfying its creditors' claims after closing all eight of its stores over the past four months, according to the company's management consultant. "This is unfortunately the liquidation of the supermarket," said Robert Riesner, president of KMR Management Inc. of Willow Grove, Pa., which works with distressed companies. "It's pretty much the conclusion. We had hoped for [a turnaround] but it just didn't materialize."
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1999
One day after the city Health Department closed Pimlico's Super Pride market for unsanitary conditions, workers carted off meat and wiped down shelves yesterday, while customers debated whether they would continue to shop there.Store officials plan to reopen the store in the 3700 block of W. Belvedere Ave. this morning, but area residents, who swapped stories yesterday of spoiled meat, withered vegetables and loaves of bread gnawed by mice, said they were not sure they would go back."It's about time.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2000
Catholic Charities, Maryland's largest private nonprofit provider of human services, bought the contents of a Super Pride market yesterday - everything from refrigeration units to shopping carts - that had anchored the Cherry Hill Town Center since January 1997. The deal was struck Friday between Catholic Charities, owner of the 16-unit shopping center, and Super Pride. The Cherry Hill store was also the site of the auction for the contents of four other stores but the sale was postponed to Nov. 27 and 28. Kerrie Burch-DeLuca, a spokeswoman for Catholic Charities, said the Super Pride market was the anchor tenant and "very important, very crucial to the center."
NEWS
October 4, 2000
THE COLLAPSE of Super Pride Markets is notable because for many of its 30 years, the Baltimore-based chain was the country's largest black-owned supermarket chain. Four of Super Pride's locations closed in recent months. The other four now will go out of business, depriving many inner-city neighborhoods of a supermarket within walking distance. As grocers nationwide have steadily increased their market share, the number of independent stores in Baltimore has shrunk. Yet these smaller chains often are the only convenient source of meats, vegetables and fruit in neighborhoods where residents are on limited incomes and without personal transportation.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Tim Craig and Allison Klein and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2000
A hungry Michelle Booth walked up to the Super Pride Market in Cherry Hill with a fistful of change yesterday afternoon, ready to buy some chicken wings from the deli. "Oh no," said Booth, 30, as she peered into the dark, closed food market in southern Baltimore. Super Pride, once one of the city's largest independent supermarket chains, quietly closed the Cherry Hill store last week and plans to shut its remaining four markets by Friday, causing waves of concern in mostly poor neighborhoods where there are few shopping options.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
Three months after closing three of its eight supermarkets, Baltimore-based Super Pride Markets will close its remaining stores, the company's management consultant said yesterday. Once one of the city's largest independent supermarket chains, Super Pride shut down its Cherry Hill Road location Thursday. The chain plans to close its other four stores, said Robert Riesner, president of KMR Management Inc. of Willow Grove, Pa., which specializes in helping troubled companies. Employees and managers also said the stores at Harford Avenue; Lafayette Avenue and Payson Street; West Belvedere Avenue; and Liberty Road will close, but it was unclear when that would happen.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 6, 2013
Klein's Family Markets will start construction Tuesday on a long-awaited supermarket in Howard Park in northwest Baltimore. A 10 a.m. groundbreaking will mark the start of work on a full-service, 68,000-square-foot ShopRite of Howard Park at 4601 Liberty Heights Avenue. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and other city officials are expected to attend. The neighborhood has been without a grocery store since 1999 when Super Pride closed. The Sun's Steve Kilar reported last month that Rite Aid of Maryland Inc., which held a legal restriction on part of the six-acre development site, had agreed to allow construction to move forward.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2012
Since its last movie screening in 1968, the historic Ambassador Theater in Howard Park has been a cosmetology school, a dance hall and a Baptist church - and in recent years a vacant shell. The Baltimore neighborhood's hopes for revitalization of the Art Deco structure are again up for discussion, after a two-alarm fire tore through the interior last week. An owner described the damage as "minimal" - up to $20,000 - and he and others nearby see an opportunity for the theater.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2011
A neighborhood meeting in Northwest Baltimore to discuss a new supermarket opened with soft organ music and bowed heads, demonstrating the importance of such a facility to a community that has done without one for more than a decade. "We pray this night for this area, called Howard Park, in particular," the Rev. Donald Sterling said Friday at the pulpit in New All Saints Catholic Church, off Liberty Heights Avenue. On either side of the altar were displayed plans for a 68,000-square-foot state-of-the-art grocery store with more than 200 parking spaces.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 28, 2011
William Lloyd "Little Willie" Adams, who went from being a numbers runner on the streets of Baltimore to the city's first prominent African-American venture capitalist, bankrolling numerous black-owned businesses such as Parks Sausage and Super Pride supermarkets, died Monday from pneumonia at Roland Park Place. He was 97 and had been in declining health in recent years. "Little Willie was an institution in Baltimore. And as far as the black community was concerned, he brought black entrepreneurs into the formerly all-white business community," former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III said Tuesday.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
John Parker, the manager of a Howard Park hardware store, remembers the days when he walked to the nearby Super Pride to grab a few items for lunch. "I used to love to get something from that supermarket, bring it back here and cook it," Parker recalled. The Super Pride store closed five years ago, creating a major inconvenience for Parker and others in the Northwest Baltimore neighborhood. With the loss of their only supermarket, Howard Park residents must drive miles to grocery stores in other communities.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2003
Tonya Rice's cart overflowed with snow-day comfort foods: boxes of ice cream, bags of Utz chips, fat cans of Glory collard greens, 2-liter bottles of ginger ale and the packet of Gummi worms her daughter Imani dipped into while they shopped. Two months ago, shopping at another store far from her East Baltimore home, such a full cart would have meant a costly hack ride for Rice. Yesterday, the 29-year-old mother discovered the benefits of shopping at a neighborhood grocery store: a quick walk home carrying her bags.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2000
Super Pride Markets, one of Baltimore's largest independent supermarket chains, has closed two of its eight stores and will soon close a third. Supermarkets on East Chase Street and Liberty Heights Avenue have closed, a company source said yesterday. Employees at the East Northern Parkway location said that store is preparing to close. Two years ago, the 30-year-old chain had remodeled a store in Cherry Hill and hoped to expand into underserved, urban areas outside Baltimore, the chain's president, Oscar Smith Jr., had said.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2002
George L. Small, a philanthropist who founded a wildlife preserve in Kenya and helped set up an alternative school there for at-risk Baltimore pupils, died Monday at his Roland Park home from complications of a brain tumor. He was 81. From 1945 to 1976, Mr. Small ran his family's York, Pa.-based food distribution business, P.A. & Small Co. The business had been in his family from the 1700s, until it merged with another company in 1976. The real love of his life was the outdoors. He was an avid fisherman and canoeist who, in 1969, inherited from his brother a 50,000-acre, 20-mile-long ranch in Kenya called Mpala.
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