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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
In a state super middleweight title match at Martin's West that closely resembled an alley fight, Stan Braxton kept his crown by bullying Gerry Walker for five rounds before stopping VTC his Baltimore rival at 2: 36 of the sixth round last night.Braxton (163) had a three-pound weight advantage, but appeared much stronger than Walker, carrying the fight from the opening bell.Braxton hurt Walker in the fourth with a hard right hand and used the same punch to finish the job in the sixth. Walker (9-9-1)
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By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | January 20, 2006
Jake Smith is promoting another boxing show, this time tonight at the Pikesville Armory. A list of the usual suspects to be featured on the professional card begins with super middleweight (168 pounds) Tony Cygan (9-0, six knockouts) and heavyweight Jed Phipps (16-3, nine KOs), both from Baltimore. Fan favorite Mike Dietrich will be there as well, but the unbeaten 22-year-old heavyweight won't be getting into the ring. Instead, Dietrich will be ringside, wearing a colostomy bag and feeling "lucky to be alive" after a stabbing incident last month left him with a punctured lung, a punctured heart valve and a severely damaged colon.
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SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1998
WALDORF -- Fighting in the main event on the first professional card ever held in Charles County, Baltimore super middleweight Dana Rucker made his own historic footnote last night at the Jaycee Community Center by knocking out Timmy Knight of Norfolk, Va., at 2: 18 of the first round.What looked like little more than a hard jab by Rucker sent Knight (12-9) flying to the canvas. He made little effort to beat the count of referee Gary Camponeschi."I wasn't expecting it," said Rucker, the former National Golden Gloves champion who improved his pro record to 5-0. "I really wanted the work, some hard rounds under my belt."
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2005
Mike Paschall loves to put on a show. "That's my job," he'll say. Last night at Woodlawn's Martin's West, the Pasadena super middleweight (168 pounds) entered the ballroom for his bout against Temple Hills' Carlos Jones wearing red and white trunks with sequined tassels, to the tunes of rapper Eminem. Meanwhile, Jones, nicknamed "Headbanger," more resembled rapper "Busta Rhymes," the name ringsiders screamed as Paschall's punches sent his dreadlocks swinging. Their frenzied brawl caused a cut over the nose of Paschall, who was penalized by referee Bill Holmes in the second and third rounds for holding and head-butting.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1997
Twelve years ago, Gerry Walker, admittedly intoxicated, was sleeping in the basement of his East Baltimore home when a three-alarm fire broke out."By the time the paramedics got to me, I had no pulse," said the super middleweight who challenges Stan Braxton for the state title tonight at Martin's West. "They told my mother I was dead. But, miraculously, they revived me."When he opened his eyes at the Key Burn Center, Walker asked the doctor two questions: "I wanted to know if I was going to live and if I'd be able to box again."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Everyone knows about the Mike Tysons, Evander Holyfields, and gold-medal winners like Oscar De La Hoya who can demand multimillion-dollar ring purses, fill arenas and attract worldwide audiences on pay-per-view.But what about the hundreds of boxers minus Olympic jewelry who scuffle in small fight clubs for purses that barely pay the rent?Take Dana Rucker, the Baltimore super middleweight who passed up a chance to go to the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.The converted kick-boxer was all but guaranteed a place on the U.S. boxing team after winning the National Golden Gloves in 1994 and the National Festival tournament a year later.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
Andre Dirrell didn't win a gold medal like Andre Ward did in Athens in August, but many in boxing consider Dirrell, whose bronze at 165 pounds was the only other American medal in the sport, the better professional prospect. That's what many ringsiders saw in the ripping jab, luring feints, stinging power and general poise displayed by the Flint, Mich,, native in the Olympics. And those are skills Dirrell, 21, vows he'll use tonight at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie, where he will begin as a professional against Ryan Franklin (2-0, two knockouts)
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 19, 1991
LAS VEGAS -- Roberto Duran all but pleaded "no mas" for the second time in his career.Duran, a four-time former champion who turns 40 in June, stopped fighting in the sixth round of his scheduled 10-round super-middleweight bout last night with journeyman Pat Lawlor of San Francisco.Lawler threw a right hand that glanced off Duran's elbow and banged into his right rib cage. The Panamanian doubled up in pain and walked slowly to his corner.Referee Vic Drakulich called timeout and signaled for ring physician Flip Homansky to examine Duran.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2005
In his professional debut in January at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie, super middleweight Anthony Dirrell of Flint, Mich., took less than a round to dispatch his New York rival. Last night, the 20-year-old's 168-pound fight lasted longer, but he was no less impressive. In the first round, Dirrell dropped Lanham's Larry Brothers with a left hook and forced a standing eight count. He also knocked out his mouthpiece. Brothers (5-14-2, four knockouts) helplessly ducked and dodged along the ropes in the second, all the while taking vicious punishment.
NEWS
August 12, 1992
The comeback of Victor Davis will highlight the next Round One Promotions dinner/boxing show Sept. 17 at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie.Davis hasn't fought in over a year, after undergoing surgery to repair a bruised retina in his right eye.The 25-year-old fighter had been ranked in the top 10 among welterweights, compiling a 24-7-1 record, but now is fighting as a junior middleweight and training at the Harding/Lowry gymnasium in Pasadena.Davis,...
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
Baltimore electrician Tim Coleman Sr. was out of a job when he went looking for work in Las Vegas nearly six years ago. When he took his son, Tim Jr., with him, the father had no idea his loss would turn into the son's gain. "Tim never really played organized sports, but he was very athletic and looking for something physical to keep him busy," said Tim Sr. "We made some calls and wound up at a boxing gym run by Richard Steele." A natural in the ring, the younger Coleman, then 14, met and trained alongside such future world champions as Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Zab Judah.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
Baltimore's Ishmail Arvin is often at his best as an undercard fighter, stealing the thunder from the main event. Tonight, Arvin (12-0-1, seven knockouts) will return to Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie, where he is 8-0 with five knockouts. But this time, as the junior middleweight (154 pounds) main event, Arvin will be the one looking to make sure he's not upstaged. For in addition to Arvin, 29, tonight's card features Washington super middleweight (168) Henry "Sugar Poo" Buchanan (10-0, 10 KOs)
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - In the mixed martial arts, which incorporates wrestling, jiujitsu and boxing, Erin Toughill rates among the world's best. Her Web site depicts her knocking out and even breaking the limbs of opponents. And at an earlier news conference, she told Laila Ali she would kick her "butt." But after nearly three rounds in the boxing ring with Ali at MCI Center last night, a bloody and badly beaten Toughill didn't look so tough. With her father, Muhammad Ali, looking on, Laila Ali scored a third-round knockout of Toughill (6-2-1)
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
Mike Ricasa doesn't need boxing. "I'm financially stable, happily married and I'm on the verge of purchasing my own business this spring," said Ricasa, a successful automotive repair specialist at a service station in Columbia. "I've been married for 17 years to my lovely wife, Sandy, we have two kids who we can afford to send to private schools, and we believe that family is No. 1 in our lives." So why does this 39-year-old father of two girls - a man who overcame a life-threatening liver problem a few years back - get such a kick out of trading blows with adversaries who most often are a full decade his junior?
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2005
In his professional debut in January at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie, super middleweight Anthony Dirrell of Flint, Mich., took less than a round to dispatch his New York rival. Last night, the 20-year-old's 168-pound fight lasted longer, but he was no less impressive. In the first round, Dirrell dropped Lanham's Larry Brothers with a left hook and forced a standing eight count. He also knocked out his mouthpiece. Brothers (5-14-2, four knockouts) helplessly ducked and dodged along the ropes in the second, all the while taking vicious punishment.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2005
Andre Dirrell promised to shine like a star. He vowed to show the crowd at Glen Burnie's Michael's Eighth Avenue how he could "get it done." And the Olympic bronze medalist generally had his way with Carlos Jones of Temple Hills last night. Dirrell dropped Jones twice, bloodying his nose and scoring a technical knockout with 10 seconds left in the fourth and final round of his super middleweight (168 pounds) professional debut. Dirrell showed a willingness to mix it up, tempting fate by dropping his hands and taking punches.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2005
Mike Paschall loves to put on a show. "That's my job," he'll say. Last night at Woodlawn's Martin's West, the Pasadena super middleweight (168 pounds) entered the ballroom for his bout against Temple Hills' Carlos Jones wearing red and white trunks with sequined tassels, to the tunes of rapper Eminem. Meanwhile, Jones, nicknamed "Headbanger," more resembled rapper "Busta Rhymes," the name ringsiders screamed as Paschall's punches sent his dreadlocks swinging. Their frenzied brawl caused a cut over the nose of Paschall, who was penalized by referee Bill Holmes in the second and third rounds for holding and head-butting.
NEWS
August 23, 1992
TCThe comeback of Victor Davis will highlight the next Round One Promotions dinner/boxing show Sept. 17 at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie.Davis hasn't fought in over a year, after undergoing surgery to repair a bruised retina in his right eye.The 25-year-old fighter had been ranked in the top 10 among welterweights, compiling a 24-7-1 record, but now is fighting as a junior middleweight and training at the Harding/Lowry gymnasium in Pasadena.Davis,...
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
Andre Dirrell didn't win a gold medal like Andre Ward did in Athens in August, but many in boxing consider Dirrell, whose bronze at 165 pounds was the only other American medal in the sport, the better professional prospect. That's what many ringsiders saw in the ripping jab, luring feints, stinging power and general poise displayed by the Flint, Mich,, native in the Olympics. And those are skills Dirrell, 21, vows he'll use tonight at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie, where he will begin as a professional against Ryan Franklin (2-0, two knockouts)
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2000
Maryland super middleweight Beethoven Scottland, who recently began working for a pest control company, proved a bit of a nuisance to title contender Thomas Tate, of Detroit, in the main event at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie last night. But in the end, Tate's experience and ring savvy proved too much to overcome as he pounded out a unanimous 10-round decision to keep his quest for a third championship challenge on track. Using a powerful straight right as his main weapon, Tate (37-6)
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