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Super Bowl Iii

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By Mike Klingaman | mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
F or Bobby Boyd, the nightmares have subsided. Forty-one years after Super Bowl III, the Baltimore Colts' All-Pro cornerback can finally go the night without waking in panic, thoughts of The Upset haunting his sleep. It took nearly this long for Boyd to shrug off the Colts' 16-7 loss to Joe Namath and the New York Jets in January 1969, a seminal moment in NFL lore and one that often is rehashed when the Super Bowl nears. The ESPN flashbacks started early this year, thanks to Sunday's AFC championship matchup between the Jets and Indianapolis Colts - a showdown whose hype has salted the old wounds of Baltimore players and fans alike.
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NEWS
By Sam Farmer, Tribune newspapers | July 25, 2010
The Colts have been the model of consistency this decade, stringing together seven consecutive seasons of 12 or more victories. Now comes a curveball. The franchise is coming off a loss in the Super Bowl for the first time since 1969, the season after the Jets beat the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III. Over the last decade, there has been a strong tendency for the loser of the Super Bowl to go in the tank the next season. The Colts won't catch any breaks in their division, either.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 13, 1999
A QUICK GLANCE at the calendar revealed that yesterday was the 30th anniversary of that day. Yes, it was exactly two score minus 10 years ago that the Baltimore Colts lost to the New York Jets in Super Bowl III. Isn't it time, fellow Balti-morons, that Joe Namath, the quarterback of that Jets team, come clean and make a confession he's avoided for the past three decades? Isn't it time the man ended his 30 years of living in denial? Super Bowl III has been called an upset. Others have called it a pivotal game in pro football history -- the one that established parity between the older, staid and conservative National Football League and the fledgling American Football League, which embodied the spirit of youthful rebellion.
SPORTS
By Colin Stevens, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
For four seasons at Maryland State College and three years with the New York Jets, Emerson Boozer and Earl Christy were teammates and friends. They lived in the same apartment complex as rookies and Christy even sold Boozer his Great Dane when they were in New York. Looking back on their seven years together, Christy remembered Boozer, the Hawks' powerful, record-breaking halfback, as an accessible star that was friendly to everyone … so long as any encounters took place off the field.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2008
If the Baltimore Colts had not lost to the New York Jets in Super Bowl III, this season's New England Patriots probably would be all alone in chasing undefeated glory. That's because the seeds of the NFL's only unbeaten team in the Super Bowl era - the 1972 Miami Dolphins - were sown in the Colts' stunning 16-7 loss in that January 1969 title game. Thirty-nine years ago, the Colts' collapse in that championship meeting created a rift between the club's owner and coach, one that festered another year until Don Shula left town.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
For Bobby Boyd, the nightmares have subsided. Forty-one years after Super Bowl III, the Baltimore Colts' All-Pro cornerback can finally go the night without waking in panic, thoughts of The Upset haunting his sleep. It took nearly this long for Boyd to shrug off the Colts' 16-7 loss to Joe Namath and the New York Jets in January 1969, a seminal moment in NFL lore and one that often is rehashed when the Super Bowl nears. The ESPN flashbacks started early this year, thanks to Sunday's AFC championship matchup between the Jets and Indianapolis Colts - a showdown whose hype has salted the old wounds of Baltimore players and fans alike.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | January 22, 1995
Curt Gowdy opened the NBC telecast 26 years ago by remarking: "Joe Namath has come down here to Miami and he has said the Jets are going to win. He doesn't even predict it. He says, 'I guarantee a Jets victory.' "That was about it for the Super Bowl III hype on Jan. 12, 1969. The pre-game show lasted 30 minutes. It didn't even include an interview with Namath. The telecast also included -- get this -- a cigarette commercial.Watching the videotape of the Super Bowl III telecast, it's obvious the game has changed as much off the field as on it.But the legend of the Jets' 16-7 upset of the Baltimore Colts is as alive today as it was a quarter of a century ago.Even the NFL, which is doing everything it can to keep a team out of Baltimore, is willing to sell Colts history.
SPORTS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | February 3, 2010
Cameron Crockett Snyder, a legendary pro football writer who covered the Baltimore Colts for The Sun for parts of four decades, was carried to his rest Tuesday as he might have wanted to be: to the strains of the Colts fight song. Snyder, who inherited his middle name from his notable ancestor, Davy Crockett, died over the weekend at 93, and among the mourners were Lenny Moore, the great Colts running back, and Ernie Accorsi, who went from Colts public relations man to general manager of the team and later of the Cleveland Browns and the New York Giants.
SPORTS
September 5, 1993
If you're old enough to remember Earl Morrall not seeing Jimmy Orr in the end zone and Tom Matte fumbling on the first play of the second half, you probably don't want to be reminded that this season is the 25th anniversary of the season that ended with Super Bowl III.The interesting thing, though, is that this year could be Super Bowl III in reverse for Baltimore. As you remember, the Colts -- the team with Morrall at quarterback -- were the 17-point favorites over the New York Jets, the team with Joe Willie Namath at quarterback.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 22, 2005
Are there some double standards going on in the media? Lordy, what am I saying? We're the media. We're no different from anybody else. Of course we practice double standards. And if there is such a thing as a double standards police to hold us all accountable, they'd no doubt be asking why all those folks upset at the conduct of some Baltimore Ravens players in the game with the Detroit Lions, haven't talked about the conduct of some Cleveland Browns players on Sunday. Granted, what the Browns' players allegedly did took place before the game.
SPORTS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | February 3, 2010
Cameron Crockett Snyder, a legendary pro football writer who covered the Baltimore Colts for The Sun for parts of four decades, was carried to his rest Tuesday as he might have wanted to be: to the strains of the Colts fight song. Snyder, who inherited his middle name from his notable ancestor, Davy Crockett, died over the weekend at 93, and among the mourners were Lenny Moore, the great Colts running back, and Ernie Accorsi, who went from Colts public relations man to general manager of the team and later of the Cleveland Browns and the New York Giants.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
For Bobby Boyd, the nightmares have subsided. Forty-one years after Super Bowl III, the Baltimore Colts' All-Pro cornerback can finally go the night without waking in panic, thoughts of The Upset haunting his sleep. It took nearly this long for Boyd to shrug off the Colts' 16-7 loss to Joe Namath and the New York Jets in January 1969, a seminal moment in NFL lore and one that often is rehashed when the Super Bowl nears. The ESPN flashbacks started early this year, thanks to Sunday's AFC championship matchup between the Jets and Indianapolis Colts - a showdown whose hype has salted the old wounds of Baltimore players and fans alike.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman | mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
F or Bobby Boyd, the nightmares have subsided. Forty-one years after Super Bowl III, the Baltimore Colts' All-Pro cornerback can finally go the night without waking in panic, thoughts of The Upset haunting his sleep. It took nearly this long for Boyd to shrug off the Colts' 16-7 loss to Joe Namath and the New York Jets in January 1969, a seminal moment in NFL lore and one that often is rehashed when the Super Bowl nears. The ESPN flashbacks started early this year, thanks to Sunday's AFC championship matchup between the Jets and Indianapolis Colts - a showdown whose hype has salted the old wounds of Baltimore players and fans alike.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2008
If the Baltimore Colts had not lost to the New York Jets in Super Bowl III, this season's New England Patriots probably would be all alone in chasing undefeated glory. That's because the seeds of the NFL's only unbeaten team in the Super Bowl era - the 1972 Miami Dolphins - were sown in the Colts' stunning 16-7 loss in that January 1969 title game. Thirty-nine years ago, the Colts' collapse in that championship meeting created a rift between the club's owner and coach, one that festered another year until Don Shula left town.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 17, 2007
Iawoke Saturday morning facing a dilemma. At Goucher College, the semifinals and finals of the Mount Mat Madness wrestling tournament were scheduled. At 4:30 p.m., my beloved Baltimore Ravens were scheduled to take on the Indianapolis Colts, whom I call the Baltimore Colts Playing in Indianapolis. Should I stay home and watch my favorite sport on television or head to Goucher and watch my really favorite sport live? I opted for Mount Mat Madness. Why should I pass on one of the best high-school wrestling tournaments in the country just because my knucklehead Ravens finally played up to their potential and made the playoffs?
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 22, 2005
Are there some double standards going on in the media? Lordy, what am I saying? We're the media. We're no different from anybody else. Of course we practice double standards. And if there is such a thing as a double standards police to hold us all accountable, they'd no doubt be asking why all those folks upset at the conduct of some Baltimore Ravens players in the game with the Detroit Lions, haven't talked about the conduct of some Cleveland Browns players on Sunday. Granted, what the Browns' players allegedly did took place before the game.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 17, 2007
Iawoke Saturday morning facing a dilemma. At Goucher College, the semifinals and finals of the Mount Mat Madness wrestling tournament were scheduled. At 4:30 p.m., my beloved Baltimore Ravens were scheduled to take on the Indianapolis Colts, whom I call the Baltimore Colts Playing in Indianapolis. Should I stay home and watch my favorite sport on television or head to Goucher and watch my really favorite sport live? I opted for Mount Mat Madness. Why should I pass on one of the best high-school wrestling tournaments in the country just because my knucklehead Ravens finally played up to their potential and made the playoffs?
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1996
There will be a void in the NFL next year.For the first time since John F. Kennedy was president, Don Shula won't be roaming an NFL sideline.When Shula, who resigned as Miami Dolphins coach Friday, became the Baltimore Colts' coach in 1963, the NFL was a 14-team league with a 14-game schedule and a $1 million-per-year-per-team TV contract.There was no cable TV, much less ESPN, no talk radio. Man hadn't yet walked on the moon. Newspaper stories were written on typewriters and filed by Western Union operators.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2004
Michael Phelps is about to take on Ian Crocker, Aaron Peirsol, Ian Thorpe and other champion swimmers seeking to keep him from ruling the pool at the 2004 Olympics. Phelps will also face a daunting opponent he can't see: the weight of great expectations fixed on his broad shoulders. It's called pressure. Advertising campaigns, a million-dollar bonus, national pride and a place in Olympic history are riding on his performance, which will be deemed a disappointment if it doesn't produce multiple gold medals.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 4, 2003
WE CAN talk just a little bit about sports in this column, can't we? Just a tiny bit? We metro columnists are discouraged from writing too much about sports. That's what this paper has Mike Preston and Laura Vecsey for. But on the chance that some readers of this column may be sports fans, I feel it's appropriate to vent about the state of athletics in these parts. So here's the deal. There I was minding my own business this past Sunday figuring I'd settle in to watch the last day of the National Football League regular season.
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