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November 17, 1994
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's return tomorrow from its triumphal month-long tour of East Asia marks the beginning of a new era. The Asian tour, capped by last week's stunning performances in Tokyo's Suntory Hall, the Japanese equivalent of Carnegie Hall, established the BSO as a world-class ensemble in the world's biggest market for classical music."
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 5, 2002
TOKYO - This tightly packed city has had quite a week. A few days ago, a typhoon hit. Last night, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra blew back into town and stirred up some downright visceral excitement in the sensationally designed Tokyo Opera City Concert Hall, after last Saturday's dynamic appearance at nearby Suntory Hall. This followup proved even better than that earlier event. Everything on the program was delivered with extra flair - a heroically scaled account of Brahms' Fourth Symphony, a sparkling version of Weber's Oberon Overture and the best-yet tour performance of Schuman's Piano Concerto.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
Television viewers are invited tonight to the equivalent of an old-fashioned vacation slide show, a behind-the-scenes video view of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's triumphant tour of Japan."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 3, 2002
OSAKA, Japan - The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra whisked into this affluent, congested city yesterday afternoon via one of the country's aptly named bullet trains from Hiroshima, with an extra little push from the Japanese press. The first notice to appear - papers here regularly take several days to run reviews - was carried in one of the national dailies, Mainichi Shimbun. The critic found much to praise about the orchestra's concert in Tokyo's Suntory Hall on Saturday, starting with an overall "enthusiasm and refreshing approach to the music."
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 30, 2002
HIROSHIMA -- Sometimes, in the swirl of unpacking and re-packing and schlepping and waiting and more schlepping, all the while still trying to shake off the enervating after-effects of jet lag, it's hard to remember why touring is such a good thing for an orchestra. And then comes a night like the one the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra had on Saturday before a sizable, enthusiastic crowd in Tokyo's premier performance venue, Suntory Hall. It's worth putting up with just about any aggravation to hear this ensemble make that kind of pour-your-heart-out music-making.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 7, 1994
Tokyo -- Last night, in a country crazy for both baseball and classical music, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and David Zinman hit one into the cheap seats.In their first concert in Tokyo's Suntory Hall, Japan's premier venue for symphonic music, the BSO and its music director won the hearts of a sophisticated audience with a program of Dvorak, Barber and Brahms. Audiences in this polite and reserved nation do not give standing ovations, but there was no mistaking the warmth with which the audience received the orchestra, the way it demanded curtain calls and how it was touched by the BSO's third and final encore -- an orchestral arrangement of the beloved Japanese folk song "Kojo no Tsuki" ("The Moon Over the Castle")
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 18, 1994
TOKYO -- The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, reveling in the success of its highly acclaimed tour of Asia, heads home today with one goal in mind for the future -- to get back to Japan as quickly as possible."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 3, 2002
OSAKA, Japan - The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra whisked into this affluent, congested city yesterday afternoon via one of the country's aptly named bullet trains from Hiroshima, with an extra little push from the Japanese press. The first notice to appear - papers here regularly take several days to run reviews - was carried in one of the national dailies, Mainichi Shimbun. The critic found much to praise about the orchestra's concert in Tokyo's Suntory Hall on Saturday, starting with an overall "enthusiasm and refreshing approach to the music."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 5, 2002
TOKYO - This tightly packed city has had quite a week. A few days ago, a typhoon hit. Last night, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra blew back into town and stirred up some downright visceral excitement in the sensationally designed Tokyo Opera City Concert Hall, after last Saturday's dynamic appearance at nearby Suntory Hall. This followup proved even better than that earlier event. Everything on the program was delivered with extra flair - a heroically scaled account of Brahms' Fourth Symphony, a sparkling version of Weber's Oberon Overture and the best-yet tour performance of Schuman's Piano Concerto.
FEATURES
November 22, 1997
MORIOKA, Japan -- Isaac Stern is talking to his violin."C'mon baby, back to sleep," the violinist says tenderly, tucking the priceless Guarnerius del Gesu once owned by the legendary Eugene Ysaye back into its case.When the great violinist will get the rest he bestows upon his beloved instrument is less certain.Stern, the Baltimore Symphony and conductor David Zinman had just delivered a passionate performance of Bruch's G Minor Concerto to a wildly appreciative audience here last night, just as they had the night before in Tokyo's Suntory Hall.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 30, 2002
HIROSHIMA -- Sometimes, in the swirl of unpacking and re-packing and schlepping and waiting and more schlepping, all the while still trying to shake off the enervating after-effects of jet lag, it's hard to remember why touring is such a good thing for an orchestra. And then comes a night like the one the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra had on Saturday before a sizable, enthusiastic crowd in Tokyo's premier performance venue, Suntory Hall. It's worth putting up with just about any aggravation to hear this ensemble make that kind of pour-your-heart-out music-making.
FEATURES
November 22, 1997
MORIOKA, Japan -- Isaac Stern is talking to his violin."C'mon baby, back to sleep," the violinist says tenderly, tucking the priceless Guarnerius del Gesu once owned by the legendary Eugene Ysaye back into its case.When the great violinist will get the rest he bestows upon his beloved instrument is less certain.Stern, the Baltimore Symphony and conductor David Zinman had just delivered a passionate performance of Bruch's G Minor Concerto to a wildly appreciative audience here last night, just as they had the night before in Tokyo's Suntory Hall.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
Television viewers are invited tonight to the equivalent of an old-fashioned vacation slide show, a behind-the-scenes video view of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's triumphant tour of Japan."
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 18, 1994
TOKYO -- The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, reveling in the success of its highly acclaimed tour of Asia, heads home today with one goal in mind for the future -- to get back to Japan as quickly as possible."
NEWS
November 17, 1994
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's return tomorrow from its triumphal month-long tour of East Asia marks the beginning of a new era. The Asian tour, capped by last week's stunning performances in Tokyo's Suntory Hall, the Japanese equivalent of Carnegie Hall, established the BSO as a world-class ensemble in the world's biggest market for classical music."
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 12, 1994
TOKYO -- Last night in Suntory Hall, the international arena in which the world's great orchestras perpetually battle, Baltimoreans could have been as proud of their symphony as they would be of the Orioles if they had just clinched the pennant.The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director David Zinman gave perhaps the greatest concert in their history together, surpassing even the fondly remembered performance in St. Petersburg that brought the orchestra's 1987 tour of Europe to a triumphant close.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 12, 1994
TOKYO -- Last night in Suntory Hall, the international arena in which the world's great orchestras perpetually battle, Baltimoreans could have been as proud of their symphony as they would be of the Orioles if they had just clinched the pennant.The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director David Zinman gave perhaps the greatest concert in their history together, surpassing even the fondly remembered performance in St. Petersburg that brought the orchestra's 1987 tour of Europe to a triumphant close.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | November 11, 1997
The Baltimore Symphony and music director David Zinman yesterday announced details of their tour of Japan, which begins Sunday.By the time they return on Nov. 29, they will have performed four concerts in Tokyo, three of them in the city's most prestigious venue, Suntory Hall, as well as in the cities of Nagoya, Osaka, Matsudo, Moiroka and Kure. Violinist Isaac Stern, the guest soloist, will perform Bruch's G Minor Concerto at four of the orchestra's nine concerts. The rest of the tour repertory will include works by Berlioz, Tchaikovsky, Debussy and Michael Torke.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 7, 1994
Tokyo -- Last night, in a country crazy for both baseball and classical music, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and David Zinman hit one into the cheap seats.In their first concert in Tokyo's Suntory Hall, Japan's premier venue for symphonic music, the BSO and its music director won the hearts of a sophisticated audience with a program of Dvorak, Barber and Brahms. Audiences in this polite and reserved nation do not give standing ovations, but there was no mistaking the warmth with which the audience received the orchestra, the way it demanded curtain calls and how it was touched by the BSO's third and final encore -- an orchestral arrangement of the beloved Japanese folk song "Kojo no Tsuki" ("The Moon Over the Castle")
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