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Sunset Boulevard

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By Paul Hodgins and Paul Hodgins,Orange County Register | March 9, 1994
What's the hottest gossip game in Hollywood? It has nothing to do with movies, television or the recording industry. This is stage gossip -- a rarity in the land of filmed, videotaped and recorded make-believe.It was announced Feb. 18 that Glenn Close will be traveling east this fall to star in the Broadway production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Sunset Boulevard."Ms. Close, who received stratospheric kudos for her portrayal of silent-screen has-been Norma Desmond when the Los Angeles production opened Dec. 9, will reprise the role when "Sunset" opens at Broadway's Minskoff Theatre Nov. 17. She'll complete her engagement at the Shubert Theatre in Century City on June 26.Now Tinseltown is abuzz with the obvious question: Who will replace Ms. Close in the Shubert's celebrated American-premiere production?
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
The Cockpit in Court Summer Theatre is in the midst of its 40th anniversary season, a significant milestone for a company that has tackled a sizable breadth of repertoire, from "Lysistrata" to "Hairspray," and maintained wallet-friendly ticket prices the whole time. This year, the troupe, based at the Community College of Baltimore County in Essex, has offered productions of "The King and I" and "Steel Magnolias," as well as a children's show, "Dr. Dolittle. " An eager, if uneven, production of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical "Sunset Boulevard" opened last weekend on the main stage; "Laura," a play version of the hit 1940s film, opens Friday in the cabaret theater.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | November 13, 1997
Hollywood is rarely guilty of introspection and even more rarely of critical introspection. One of the finest examples of the admittedly limited genre is a 1950 masterpiece that only gets better with repeated viewings."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
Take the classic film "Sunset Boulevard," slip in the witty "Guy Noir" feature from "Prairie Home Companion," and toss the whole mix into a swimming pool, and you might end up with something like "Mobtown Murder Mystery" — the latest production by Fluid Movement, one of Baltimore's zaniest organizers of performance art. "I'm a film noir nerd," said Valarie Perez-Schere, a founding member of Fluid Movement who helped organize the new show. "Last year, I saw a guy doing a dead-man float in the pool and thought, 'Oh, it's just like the opening scene of "Sunset Boulevard.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 22, 2007
DON'T CALL it a comeback! It's a `return.'" That's what Gloria Swanson insisted, playing out the role of desperate, forgotten star Norma Desmond, in the great 1950 film Sunset Boulevard. As you know, and as we just reported, the long aborning plan to put the London and Broadway musical version of Sunset on the big screen has heated up again. Barbra Streisand, Meryl Streep and Glenn Close are the top contenders. (Interestingly, all three were also in the running for the equally dragged-out proceedings surrounding another Andrew Lloyd Webber musical headed to the big screen, Evita.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 5, 1995
"Sunset Boulevard," a $13 million musical extravaganza, and "Love! Valour! Compassion!" a $750,000 bargain play produced under a cost-cutting plan, took top honors at the 49th annual Tony Awards last night."Sunset Boulevard's" win was as predictable as the sunrise since it was the only full-fledged new musical to open on Broadway this season. The Andrew Lloyd Webber musical adaptation of Billy Wilder's classic 1950 movie won more Tonys than any other show -- seven, including one for leading lady Glenn Close's portrayal of silent movie diva Norma Desmond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
The Cockpit in Court Summer Theatre is in the midst of its 40th anniversary season, a significant milestone for a company that has tackled a sizable breadth of repertoire, from "Lysistrata" to "Hairspray," and maintained wallet-friendly ticket prices the whole time. This year, the troupe, based at the Community College of Baltimore County in Essex, has offered productions of "The King and I" and "Steel Magnolias," as well as a children's show, "Dr. Dolittle. " An eager, if uneven, production of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical "Sunset Boulevard" opened last weekend on the main stage; "Laura," a play version of the hit 1940s film, opens Friday in the cabaret theater.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 1996
Take away the spectacular sets of Andrew Lloyd Webber's musicals and you're still left with more than enough music to fill the stage.The 37 musical numbers packed into the Webber retrospective "Music of the Night" bombard the audience with so much emotion and volume that the Lyric Opera House is the site to visit for the worldwide Webber network of fans.Be advised, though, that the concert-version staging translates into "Cats" who wear evening clothes as they go through their slinky feline motions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 28, 1999
Petula Clark may be forever associated with "Downtown," "Don't Sleep in the Subway" and "I Know a Place." But lately the place she's come to know best is a palatial mansion on Sunset Boulevard, home of faded silent screen star Norma Desmond. The British singer has played the lead in Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Sunset Boulevard" longer than any other actress -- longer than Glenn Close or Betty Buckley or Patti LuPone or Elaine Paige or Diahann Carroll. But she's had a bit of a love-hate relationship with the role.
NEWS
January 6, 1996
Leon Schwab, 85, founder of the famed Sunset Boulevard pharmacy that was a meeting place for Hollywood stars, died Thursday in Los Angeles of complications from surgery for a broken hip.Charlie Chaplin would step behind the counter at the pharmacy to make his own sodas and Marilyn Monroe and Ronald Reagan were regulars. Mr. Schwab said Gloria Swanson bought her makeup from him, and her movie "Sunset Boulevard" featured scenes at the lunch counter. Schwab's closed in 1983 after 52 years.Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
Florence Foster Jenkins could most easily have summed up her, um, art, by paraphrasing a line from The Importance of Being Earnest: "I don't sing accurately - anyone can sing accurately - but I sing with wonderful expression." Excruciating expression. Jenkins, whose sold-out recital at Carnegie Hall in 1944 is the stuff of legend, inspired Stephen Temperley's amusing, affectionate, somewhat-overpadded show Souvenir, which opened Thursday at Center Stage with the original stars of the 2005 Broadway production.
BUSINESS
By Jessica Garrison and Jessica Garrison,Los Angeles Times | June 22, 2008
LOS ANGELES - In Beverly Hills, a 32,000-square-foot beaux-arts mansion that will be sheathed in Portuguese limestone and adorned with gold-plated doorknobs fashioned in France is rising on Sunset Boulevard. A few miles away in Bel-Air, businessman Eri Kroh has requested permits to lop off the top of a hill, fill in a canyon and then, after moving 68,000 cubic yards of dirt, replace the chaparral-covered lot with a 30,000-plus square-foot single-family home with Pacific Ocean views. Just down the hill, workers recently were building retaining walls for a giant lot that real estate experts say could soon feature one or two giant palacelike homes.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 10, 2007
I LOST my reputation young, but never missed it," said Mae West, the only star who never mourned lost youth, faded career or lack of public interest. Why? Because Mae didn't believe those things happened to her! (Mae was Billy Wilder's first choice for Sunset Boulevard.) She was by far the most self-assured, ego-driven actress ever to set foot on a soundstage, usually referring to herself in the third person. Reputations Part 1 Speaking of reputations, there is still talk going around Hollywood that Britney Spears will consent to "talk" with TV's Dr. Phil, the better to be straightened out. I think most of this talk is coming from the ubiquitous doctor himself - wishin' and hopin'.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 22, 2007
DON'T CALL it a comeback! It's a `return.'" That's what Gloria Swanson insisted, playing out the role of desperate, forgotten star Norma Desmond, in the great 1950 film Sunset Boulevard. As you know, and as we just reported, the long aborning plan to put the London and Broadway musical version of Sunset on the big screen has heated up again. Barbra Streisand, Meryl Streep and Glenn Close are the top contenders. (Interestingly, all three were also in the running for the equally dragged-out proceedings surrounding another Andrew Lloyd Webber musical headed to the big screen, Evita.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 20, 2007
DO you believe what you read in the English papers? If so, you'll believe that Glenn Close, Barbra Streisand and Meryl Streep are all elbowing and shoving in order to win the coveted role of a lifetime. That is to play the silent-screen actress Norma Desmond in the eventual movie version of the musical Sunset Boulevard. In this triumvirate, Streep, an Oscar winner many times over, is the youngest contender - she's 58. Her good friend Close is 60. And superstar Streisand is 65 and now riding high after a moneymaking concert-tour abroad.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | March 17, 2006
Before you started watching the NCAA tournament yesterday, maybe you needed to know the regional home of the Ian Eagle-Jim Spanarkel team (Salt Lake City). Or perhaps you were concerned about the placement of Verne Lundquist-Bill Raftery (Auburn Hills, Mich.). Did you worry about where CBS put Dick Enberg-Jay Bilas (San Diego)? Probably not. The fact is, some people -- and that would be some people such as I -- make a big deal out of who's announcing the games. But, at the same time, even I recognize that you're watching the NCAA tournament because of the important, exciting sporting event it is, not because of who's calling the games.
NEWS
December 30, 2002
Glen Seator, 46, a highly regarded sculptor who became known in the 1990s for work that replicated architectural situations with uncanny verisimilitude, died Dec. 21 at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. He was working on the chimney of his house when he fell to his death, said his sister, Patricia Seator. Mr. Seator created works that blended realism and surrealism, and commented on social issues. In 1999, he transformed the Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills, Calif., into a check-cashing store, painstakingly replicating the street facade and interior of a business in a Latino neighborhood on Sunset Boulevard.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | November 27, 1994
New York -- "Show Boat" and "Sunset Boulevard." On the surface, they don't appear to have much in common -- besides the coincidence of being the only two musicals to open on Broadway in the first half of a paltry season.But just beneath the surface lies a shared theme that is one of the strongest and most enduring in the history of musical theater. Both "Show Boat" and "Sunset Boulevard" are shows about show business.* "Show Boat," written in 1927 by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II and based on the novel by Edna Ferber, spans four decades in the lives of the extended family on the fictitious Cotton Blossom, a Mississippi River show boat.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 1, 2004
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra hit pay dirt when it hired Jack Everly as principal pops conductor. He clicks with the musicians in a big way, bringing exceptional knowledge and communicative skills to the podium. Above all, he believes in what he's doing. It's a genuine passion, and it can be contagious. Everly is also music director of the Symphonic Pops Consortium, which pools the resources of six orchestras to produce thoroughly professional presentations with costumes and lighting like the BSO's current show, Broadway Divas.
NEWS
December 30, 2002
Glen Seator, 46, a highly regarded sculptor who became known in the 1990s for work that replicated architectural situations with uncanny verisimilitude, died Dec. 21 at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. He was working on the chimney of his house when he fell to his death, said his sister, Patricia Seator. Mr. Seator created works that blended realism and surrealism, and commented on social issues. In 1999, he transformed the Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills, Calif., into a check-cashing store, painstakingly replicating the street facade and interior of a business in a Latino neighborhood on Sunset Boulevard.
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