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NEWS
By William Hageman and William Hageman,bhageman@tribune.com | May 25, 2009
It has happened to most of us: You get lost in the warmth of a summer day - at the beach, playing softball, biking or even just working in the garden - and before you know it you have a bad sunburn. A new device, the UVSunSense wristband, should eliminate the problem. The wristband, used in conjunction with a reliable sunscreen, lets the wearer know when that sunscreen is no longer doing its job. The wristband stands up to water - fresh, salt or chlorinated - and helps the wearer gauge how much UV radiation he or she has soaked up. The technology behind the wristband is similar to that used in the monitoring devices that nuclear plant workers wear to measure levels of radiation exposure.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
I am a member of the baby oil generation. Half a century ago, we spent our summers at the pool, slick with a kind of fluid magnifying glass that turned our skin red, then brown. You wouldn't have been caught dead without a suntan back in the day. And you were in a hurry to get it done so you would spend the rest of the summer glowing in your sundresses and your two-piece bathing suits. There was an art to "laying out," as we called it. We were so focused on rotating our exposure to the sun - like rotisserie chickens on a spit - that we barely paid attention to the boys.
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FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Contributing Writers | July 27, 1993
Q: I've been reading a lot about sunburn and its relationship to skin cancer. What's the best kind of sunscreen to put on my children?You are right to note that sunburn during childhood or adolescence increases an individual's risk for developing skin cancer in adult life.A: You may not be aware that excessive sun exposure also leads to premature wrinkling of the skin.These are two compelling reasons for ensuring that children are adequately protected from the sun.Sunlight contains two types of radiation, ultraviolet A and B.Both harm the skin in different ways.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 11, 2012
Two new government studies show young people are still putting themselves at risk for skin cancer by getting sunburned and going to indoor tanning beds. One study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that half of those aged 18 to 29 had at least one sunburn it the past year, though they were increasingly using sunscreen, seeking shade and wearing protective clothing. The other study by the National Cancer Institute found 32 percent of those 18 to 21 were going to indoor tanning salons and 30 percent of those 22 to 25 were.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | July 10, 2005
Is there a product containing both sunscreen and bug control (DEET) on the market? Are there any problems applying sunscreen and then 25 percent DEET spray? Several combination products with both insect repellent and sunscreen are available. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn't recommend them because "sunscreen requires frequent applications while DEET should be used sparingly." Recent research shows another problem with such combination products (British Journal of Dermatology, June 2005)
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | September 29, 1991
Imagine yourself seated in the upper deck of the new ballpark in a well-known downtown location. (Sorry, still no name at press time.)You're sipping a cola drink and trying to keep the sun off your neck.For an "I Love Tim Hulett" T-shirt, what part of this dream scenario is most unlikely?It is the sun-off-the-neck thing, of course. Blistering rays will bake the new home field of the Baltimore Orioles, but not many of the fans in the upper deck will be similarly cooked, thanks to the new ballpark's sunscreen.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | July 17, 2008
You have written columns suggesting use of sunscreens with microparticles of zinc or titanium. I read that some scientists are concerned about nanoparticles found in products such as sunscreen. These particles are so tiny, they could get into places in our bodies that larger particles can't. No one knows how dangerous this might be, but some experts suggest we exercise caution and avoid nanotechnology in products such as sunscreen. Shouldn't you warn people about the danger? The Environmental Working Group is a collaborative group of scientists that first raised a red flag about nanoparticles in sunscreens.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | July 16, 1991
The sun can wrinkle your skin, make you look older and give you skin cancer. You can't prevent sun damage just by slathering yourself with sunscreen.More than 600,000 new cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed in the United States this year, largely because people do not know how to protect themselves from the rays.When you work out in the sun, you are exposed to two types of sun rays: UVA rays, which primarily cause aging and wrinkling, and UVB rays, which go much deeper into the skin to cause cancer.
FEATURES
By LISA SKOLNIK and LISA SKOLNIK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 10, 1999
It's time to slather on the sunscreen. But any old brand won't do, even if it's an SPF15 (the sun protection factor experts recommend to block out the most dangerous ultra-violet rays) or higher. Recent studies show that we've been underrating the power of those rays.How so? UV rays are divided into two spectrums: UVA (which has two ranges, I and II) and UVB. "Up until recently, we've focused our attention on combating UVA II and UVB rays, because we thought UVA I rays were harmless," says Dr. James Leyden, dermatology professor at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 24, 2005
I have been using a baby sunscreen for my 22-month-old son. It has an SPF of 30. Whenever we go out in the sun, I slather the stuff on and then slather on more throughout the day. Someone recently told me that sunscreen can be absorbed through the skin and get into the circulation. Is this true? Are there any dangers in using sunscreen daily on a toddler? Researchers have found that some popular sunscreen ingredients are absorbed from the skin and can be measured in the urine (Journal of Investigative Dermatology, July 2004)
FEATURES
Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Summer is just around the corner, but its damaging rays and humidity have already arrived. We all know too much sun can damage skin and speed aging, while too much moisture can clog pores. With the right products, you can keep your skin safe from the sun and harness the season's humidity. Here are five ways to make sure your skin stays healthy this season: 1. Pick a broad-spectrum sunscreen. New sunscreen labeling laws require companies to reveal whether their products block UVA rays, UVB rays or both.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | June 15, 2011
Just last week, when triple-digit temperatures prompted schools to close and governments to issue heat advisories, venturing out into the sun was something to avoid. But now that the weather has cooled down to the reasonable range, here's some news about sunscreen labeling that could soon help guide you while shopping for sun protection. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has just issued new regulations for sunscreen labeling that should make it easier for consumers to choose the right sunscreen for them.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
Outdoor festivals like the Preakness can mean hours in the harsh rays. Most people know that the sun can be damaging yet still don't adequately cover up. May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month, and Dr. Mark Lowitt, a dermatologist at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, answered questions about sunscreen and avoiding damage. What is the best ingredient (and best number of SPF) to look for in a sunscreen? For most people, we recommend sunscreens with an SPF of 30. For people who are at especially high risk for skin cancer, such as those with a past history of skin cancer, those with extremely fair and easily burned skin, or those with many moles, we recommend sunscreens with SPF of 50 or greater.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2010
Temperatures are rising and beach season is in full swing — which means consumers are stocking up on sunscreen. But it's not as easy as S-P-F. Store shelves are loaded with sprays and lotions with SPFs, or sun protection factors, approaching triple digits. Some protect against sunburn but not long-term skin damage. Then there's recent research that found all but a sliver of sunscreen products less effective than manufacturers claim — and even potentially dangerous. And with all that confounding consumers, medical experts worry that claims of high-level protection could lull consumers into a false sense of security or fears about safety could deter them from using sunscreen altogether.
SPORTS
February 25, 2010
This is the PGA Tour's feel-good week. Days after cacti appeared to outnumber spectators at the Accenture Match Play Championship near Tucson, Ariz., the tour moves to the renamed Waste Management Phoenix Open. It's a golfapalooza event that features live music, ample amounts of boozing and sunscreen and masses of fans. Tournament Chairman David Rauch predicts that as many as 120,000 will show up for Sunday's final round. Most tour players love it. "It's the most fun week of the year," Kevin Streelman said by telephone.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | August 24, 2009
Question: : I have to use insect repellent every time I go outside. When I also need sunscreen, which goes on first? Answer: : This straightforward question has no simple answer. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that "sunscreens should be applied to the skin before insect repellents." In the next sentence, however, the CDC advises travelers not to use combination products containing both repellents and sunscreens. It points out that "DEET-containing insect repellents may decrease the effectiveness of sunscreens and sunscreens may increase absorption of DEET through the skin."
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | June 16, 1992
Exposure to the sun can cause your skin to wrinkle and age prematurely, give you skin cancer and even interfere with your body's ability to fight off infections.The sun's two ultraviolet rays -- UVA and UVB -- can be extremely damaging. UVB primarily causes sunburn and skin cancer, while UVA primarily causes premature aging and wrinkling. Both can cause aging and cancer, though.The ultimate way to protect your skin, although it is an extreme measure, is to stay out of the sun altogether; or, wear clothing that limits your exposure.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | August 24, 2009
Question: : I have to use insect repellent every time I go outside. When I also need sunscreen, which goes on first? Answer: : This straightforward question has no simple answer. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that "sunscreens should be applied to the skin before insect repellents." In the next sentence, however, the CDC advises travelers not to use combination products containing both repellents and sunscreens. It points out that "DEET-containing insect repellents may decrease the effectiveness of sunscreens and sunscreens may increase absorption of DEET through the skin."
NEWS
By William Hageman and William Hageman,bhageman@tribune.com | May 25, 2009
It has happened to most of us: You get lost in the warmth of a summer day - at the beach, playing softball, biking or even just working in the garden - and before you know it you have a bad sunburn. A new device, the UVSunSense wristband, should eliminate the problem. The wristband, used in conjunction with a reliable sunscreen, lets the wearer know when that sunscreen is no longer doing its job. The wristband stands up to water - fresh, salt or chlorinated - and helps the wearer gauge how much UV radiation he or she has soaked up. The technology behind the wristband is similar to that used in the monitoring devices that nuclear plant workers wear to measure levels of radiation exposure.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | May 4, 2009
Breast cancer runs in my family. My mother had it first, and I was diagnosed six years ago. Mine was estrogen receptor positive, so I avoid sources of estrogen. Last year, I read that some sunscreens have estrogenic activity. Is this true? I would like to know for my own safety and for my daughters and granddaughters. They will be slathering on sunscreen all summer long. I'd like to know which ingredients could be a problem and which are safe. It comes as a shock to many people that some chemicals in sunscreens can be absorbed into the body (Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, April 2008)
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