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NEWS
June 22, 1997
MARYLAND'S "sunny day" fund has proved to be an enormous help in luring new businesses to this state and keeping existing companies from moving elsewhere. But this fund can easily be turned into a powerful vehicle to aid the governor's re-election.That may have been the case with an attempt by the Glendening administration to lend $500,000 in state funds to the owner of six radio stations in the Baltimore-Washington area. The proposal appears to serve a political purpose. In fact, one Annapolis official called it "a real stinker."
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
A sunny day with temperatures rising into the mid-80s is expected Wednesday before clouds and likely storms move in by midnight. Overnight lows in the 60s were expected, rising into the low 80s by midday. Skies are forecast to be mostly sunny, with some clouds moving in by the afternoon and increasing into the nighttime hours. Thunderstorms are likely in the late evening hours, possibly continuing overnight into Thursday morning. More than half an inch of rain is possible Wednesday night through Thursday morning.
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NEWS
August 7, 1995
Some state legislators in Annapolis are furious that Gov. Parris Glendening is running through a new $20 million "sunny day" economic development incentive fund as though the money will never end. They see it as irresponsible spending. In fact, these lawmakers should be applauding what's been happening because it is good news for the state's future.Even critics concede that the money from the sunny day reserve fund is going for worthwhile business projects. The payments -- some in the form of loans that will be repaid eventually -- should lead to nearly 900 new jobs and keep another 650 workers in Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The news of Shirley Temple's death cast a cloud over an otherwise sunny day here in Baltimore. I do not hesitate to confess that some of my favorite times as a kid -- and, yes, in later years, too -- were spent watching her childhood movies. I didn't care how cornball or contrived the plots. I just loved her smile, her voice, her unpretentious talent. Not to mention the songs and the many vibrant actors who worked with her, helping to make even the silliest of theĀ  movies enjoyable and often quite touching.
NEWS
August 9, 1995
The Glendening administration is running through the $20 million in Maryland's "sunny day" economic development incentive fund as though there's no tomorrow. Some legislators say this is irresponsible spending. In fact, lawmakers should be applauding what's happening because it is good news for the state's future well-being.Even critics concede the money is going for solid, worthwhile business projects. The payments -- some in the form of loans that will be repaid -- should lead to nearly 900 new jobs and keep another 650 existing jobs in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
Maryland businesses have come up with their wish lists, with some expensive and perhaps contentious items on the roster of goodies.The General Assembly has received requests for the next round of Sunny Day Funds, state government loans that companies can use to bolster their operations.The loans are desirable because they offer below-market rates and may be deferred or even forgiven entirely if the company meets agreed-upon employment or capitalization goals.According to information provided by the Department of Legislative Services, the current Sunny Day applications vary widely in size and purpose.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
The Glendening administration is recommending that the state tap its "Sunny Day" fund for about $21 million for nine projects designed to create an estimated 2,000 jobs and retain another 8,000 in Maryland.The largest of the payments, $11.5 million, would go to Northrop Grumman Corp. as an incentive to upgrade its facilities and expand its work force at its Electronic Sensors and Systems Division near Baltimore-Washington International Airport.The combination of loans and grants represents an aggressive effort by the state to protect the 7,300-strong work force at the Northrop facility, which it acquired from Westinghouse Corp.
BUSINESS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
With few objections, top state legislators easily approved more than $7 million in government loans and grants yesterday to help finance the expansion of four Maryland companies.The projects include a $4 million state loan to help MedImmune Inc. of Gaithersburg build a $43.8 million biotechnology manufacturing plant in Frederick, creating 219 jobs by 1999. Tessco Technologies Inc., a wholesaler of wireless phone equipment, will receive a $1 million state grant toward a $9.5 million expansion that would create 123 jobs in Hunt Valley.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1999
State legislators moved to gain more timely oversight of Maryland's "Sunny Day" economic development fund yesterday after a report that the General Assembly often votes on projects after they are under construction and it is too late to reject them.Part of a larger revamping of Maryland economic development programs, a draft bill approved by a legislative task force would create a small legislative committee that could meet quickly and often to vote on smaller Sunny Day deals.The Sunny Day fund gives loans and grants to businesses to induce them to move to or stay in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
Maryland lawmakers approved $16.4 million in economic development aid to private industry yesterday, boosting a group of high-tech companies and a hand-blown glass manufacturer moving into depressed Garrett County.In contrast to last year, the Legislative Policy Committee gave its blessing to the latest round of business grants and low-interest loans with little debate.None of the expenditures from the state's Sunny Day Fund was politically sensitive, unlike the $500,000 sought by the Glendening administration last year for an influential chain of radio stations.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 8, 2014
Everybody was afraid of freezing. I was afraid of falling. During the recent polar vortex - we used to call them cold snaps - warnings were issued about frostbite and how quickly it can attack bare skin when temperatures drop into the single digits and below. But while the rest of the world was covering up, I was concentrating on staying upright. I have what is known as a fear of falling, and I should, because I fall often enough. It is a natural fear and typical of most humans, to varying degrees.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
A pleasant Veterans Day with highs in the mid and upper 50s is forecast for Baltimore and the region by the National Weather Service. A westerly wind is forecast to blow across bright, mostly sunny skies at between 5 and 13 miles per hour. The picture for the rest of the week is forecast to be less rosy. Starting Tuesday the weather is expected to take a turn, with a chance of snow flurries arriving in the early morning along with an Arctic cold front. That front is forecast to bring with it "winter-like" temperatures, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
He's across the Atlantic from his native Ireland, but Ken Keady was wearing the green Sunday as he bobbed his 3-year-old daughter on his shoulders to see Baltimore's St. Patrick Parade. "It's a great occasion, a lot of color, a lot of flags and lot of music. I come every year," said Keady, now of Towson, with daughter Carolyn waving the Irish flag above his head. Keady pronounced Baltimore's parade as "one of the best I've ever seen" - and he's seen them in Dublin, he said. The Keady family was among thousands of people lining the route for the kilted bagpipe bands and eye-popping string bands, dance troupes, students, classic cars, floats and more.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Runners have less than a week and a half to go before the Baltimore Running Festival, and according to early forecasts, weather is the least of their worries come race day. It's too early for a truly dependable forecast, but long-range forecasts are calling for a dry and cool fall day. The Climate Prediction Center is expecting about a one in three chance of below normal temperatures and likely normal precipitation. Normal for this time of year are morning lows in the upper 40s and highs in the upper 60s, with mostly dry weather.
SPORTS
By Scott Dance | March 30, 2012
Opening Day is a week away, and little has changed in AccuWeather's long-range forecast -- the Orioles could be meeting the Minnesota Twins under drizzly skies. But the outlook isn't unanimous. Next Friday is still a few days outside the National Weather Service's forecasts, but AccuWeather is calling for a high of 61 with "a few showers" in the area. That's slightly less wet than the forecast looked 10 days out. Weather Underground predicts a zero percent chance of precipitation and a high of 59. The Weather Channel, meanwhile, is also calling for clear skies, but it is predicting a high of 69 degrees.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | July 30, 2010
It was a day right out of a picture postcard: blue skies filled with puffy white clouds, temperatures in the 70s, the sun slanting off the bright green practice fields at McDaniel College. Finally it looked like the Ravens might catch a break. Finally it looked like they might enjoy a day without controversy, without a player shooting off his mouth or falling down a flight of stairs or flopping on the ground in exhaustion after failing his conditioning test. A record crowd of 11,506 was on hand to watch the team's first full-squad workout of the new season.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1996
State economic development officials have asked legislators to approve $6.2 million in new business-incentive spending from Maryland's "Sunny Day" fund for projects that would bring more than 1,000 new jobs to the state, most of them in Baltimore and Howard counties.The Department of Business and Economic Development formally requested the money this week, and the General Assembly's Legislative Policy Committee will vote on the deals this month, said Michael Volk, an official with the Department of Legislative Reference.
BUSINESS
By Marina Sarris and Mark Guidera and Marina Sarris and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1996
A state legislative panel is expected today to approve more than $7 million in "Sunny Day" economic development loans and grants to help four Maryland companies expand.The largest project that legislators are expected to approve is a $4 million state loan for a $43.8 million biotechnology manufacturing plant in Frederick that MedImmune Inc., of Gaithersburg, wants to build. That project would create 219 jobs by 1999.The Sunny Day fund is used to provide financial incentives to attract new businesses to Maryland and keep existing companies from leaving.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | July 13, 2008
There are many times when fishing with kids beats fishing with grown-ups. Sure, you might spend a great deal of time baiting hooks, wiping fish slime from tiny hands and dodging the occasional incoming bobber. On the other hand, you don't have to talk about gas prices and spineless politicians while scrambling to think of a compliment for fried chicken that tastes like it came in close contact with WD-40. For me, it's no contest. Yesterday morning, as the sun was turning the Chesapeake Bay into the world's largest bowl of steaming bouillabaisse, families willingly left the protection of the cooling woods of Downs Park to take part in the Pasadena Sportfishing Group's fishing derby.
NEWS
By Kurt Ullrich | June 25, 2008
One can only wonder if a plague of locusts is far behind. This has been what some might call a biblical year out here in the Midwest. January began with lingering heavy and persistent snows, followed by an earthquake, deadly tornado activity, and severe June flooding. Reports by the national media have made it sound like we Iowans are chest-deep in water, which isn't exactly the case. For most, the rain and flooding have been nothing more than a nuisance, washing out driveways, closing roads and bridges, etc. Getting from here to there has become more complicated.
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