Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSunni Triangle
IN THE NEWS

Sunni Triangle

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - In the aftermath of the three-week battle for Najaf, interim Iraqi government officials yesterday inspected the extensive damage and pledged to undertake major reconstruction efforts. But though the holy city was quiet, violence flared elsewhere in Iraq. Much of the deadly activity was in the so-called Sunni Triangle region, which had been relatively calm during the conflict in Najaf. There was also violence in anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's stronghold in Baghdad's Sadr City slum.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
While David Danelo was in Iraq two years ago, he was "one of those guys" who wrote home about once a month to let friends and family know how things were going. As a Marine Corps captain in Fallujah -- an insurgent stronghold in the Sunni triangle -- he had plenty to say in his "updates from the front." The e-mails were passed around by friends and family and eventually caught the eye of Steven Pressfield, the author of Gates of Fire. The historical novel chronicles the Battle of Thermopylae, during which about 7,000 Greek allies held off millions of Persians in a mountain pass for three days in 480 B.C. Pressfield, whose work is popular with Marines, told Danelo he was a good writer, which made the young captain feel like "Babe Ruth had just told me I was a good baseball player."
Advertisement
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Militants unleashed a series of car bomb attacks and ambushes in the city of Samarra and across central Iraq yesterday, killing about 30 people, wounding nearly two dozen Americans and undercutting U.S. claims that rebel violence in the region had been brought under control. In Samarra, attacks targeted police stations and a U.S.-Iraqi military convoy and occurred within minutes of one another, suggesting they may have been part of a coordinated assault. Most of the 29 dead were Iraqi police officers.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
When her boyfriend left for the war last year, Kelly Harris had not heard of Fallujah. She did not yet know about the Sunni Triangle, Iraqi politics or improvised explosive devices. All she knew, Harris said, was that her boyfriend, Marine Reserve Lance Cpl. Jason Redmond, had been called to serve his country and that she would have trouble sleeping until he came home. Yesterday, Harris, 35, waited anxiously at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. After seven months in Iraq, her boyfriend was among 33 troops coming home - to an explosion of joy. The detachment of 31 Marine reservists and two Navy corpsman from the Baltimore-based 4th Combat Engineer Battalion had spent the bulk of its deployment in the Sunni Triangle, which has seen some of the most heated battles between U.S. forces and Iraqi insurgents.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - As U.S. Marines prepare to return to the Iraqi city of Fallujah, scene of the grisly killings of four American security workers on Wednesday, there is growing fear in both Washington and Baghdad that the insurgency centered in the Sunni Triangle could swell into a general uprising. Yesterday, clerics in the city condemned the desecration of the bodies as violations of Islamic law - but said nothing of the killings themselves. The Sunni anger is reflected in a new poll that said seven out of 10 Iraqis who live in the region where the four Americans were killed and their bodies mutilated think attacking coalition forces is acceptable behavior.
NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Alissa J. Rubin and Ashraf Khalil and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Dozens were killed and scores wounded yesterday in a bloody day of violence across Iraq that saw at least three suicide car bombings and an exchange of gunfire between an Iraqi crowd and a U.S. helicopter crew. The latest wave of attacks, which included hours of mortar fire on the Green Zone where the U.S. Embassy, interim Iraqi government and many U.S. contractors have their headquarters, was centered in Baghdad but included several cities in the Sunni Triangle of central Iraq.
NEWS
By Louis J. Cantori | June 30, 2003
NEARLY 11 WEEKS after the toppling of the statue of Saddam Hussein in Baghdad, expectations in Iraq are plummeting. There has been no jubilant reception of the troops, and basic personal security, civil services, sound administration and democratic representation are virtually nonexistent. Most importantly, the military campaign continues. Americans are dying. American policy is faltering, if not failing. Military victory eludes the coalition forces. According to Carl von Clausewitz in his 1832 classic On War, victory occurs when the enemy's army is destroyed, there is a formal surrender and, in particular, the enemy's will is bent to your own. He made the further point that this is accomplished by conquest, not by the "hearts and mind" war of "liberation" of Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and his Pentagon team - his deputy, Paul Wolfowitz, Richard Perle, Douglas J. Feith and others.
NEWS
By Fawaz A. Gerges | April 4, 2004
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Since the capture of Saddam Hussein in December, a drumbeat of attacks across central and northern Iraq have claimed hundreds of Iraqi and American lives and have given little hope that the war is winding down. There are daily reports of insurgent attacks against Americans, Iraqi police and soft targets. In one day last week, four American contractors were killed in a rebel ambush in Fallujah and jubilant residents dragged charred corpses through the streets and hanged two of them from a bridge.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
When her boyfriend left for the war last year, Kelly Harris had not heard of Fallujah. She did not yet know about the Sunni Triangle, Iraqi politics or improvised explosive devices. All she knew, Harris said, was that her boyfriend, Marine Reserve Lance Cpl. Jason Redmond, had been called to serve his country and that she would have trouble sleeping until he came home. Yesterday, Harris, 35, waited anxiously at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. After seven months in Iraq, her boyfriend was among 33 troops coming home - to an explosion of joy. The detachment of 31 Marine reservists and two Navy corpsman from the Baltimore-based 4th Combat Engineer Battalion had spent the bulk of its deployment in the Sunni Triangle, which has seen some of the most heated battles between U.S. forces and Iraqi insurgents.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - The weeklong U.S. assault on the Sunni Triangle with 1-ton bombs, artillery barrages and lightning raids is meant to send a blunt message of American resolve - as much as rounding up Baathist insurgents and destroying caches of weapons, military officers say. "It's a psychological tool," said one senior military officer at the Pentagon, pointing to operations with names like "Iron Hammer" and "Ivy Cyclone" and "Furious Fire." The message: "We're not quitting. We're taking the fight to you."
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and James Janega and Alex Rodriguez and James Janega,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 8, 2004
NEAR FALLUJAH, Iraq -- American troops began a drive into western sections of the rebel-held city of Fallujah last night, securing a hospital and major bridges in what appeared to be the initial phase of an all-out assault to retake the city and crush the insurgency that has controlled it since April. The push into Fallujah began hours after interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi imposed a 60-day state of emergency in most of the country to confront a fresh wave of violence sweeping Iraq. Facing a decisive battle in Fallujah, where they are severely outgunned and outmanned, insurgents have engineered widespread attacks across central and western Iraq in the past two days, killing at least 50 people and wounding scores.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Militants unleashed a series of car bomb attacks and ambushes in the city of Samarra and across central Iraq yesterday, killing about 30 people, wounding nearly two dozen Americans and undercutting U.S. claims that rebel violence in the region had been brought under control. In Samarra, attacks targeted police stations and a U.S.-Iraqi military convoy and occurred within minutes of one another, suggesting they may have been part of a coordinated assault. Most of the 29 dead were Iraqi police officers.
NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Alissa J. Rubin and Ashraf Khalil and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Dozens were killed and scores wounded yesterday in a bloody day of violence across Iraq that saw at least three suicide car bombings and an exchange of gunfire between an Iraqi crowd and a U.S. helicopter crew. The latest wave of attacks, which included hours of mortar fire on the Green Zone where the U.S. Embassy, interim Iraqi government and many U.S. contractors have their headquarters, was centered in Baghdad but included several cities in the Sunni Triangle of central Iraq.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - In the aftermath of the three-week battle for Najaf, interim Iraqi government officials yesterday inspected the extensive damage and pledged to undertake major reconstruction efforts. But though the holy city was quiet, violence flared elsewhere in Iraq. Much of the deadly activity was in the so-called Sunni Triangle region, which had been relatively calm during the conflict in Najaf. There was also violence in anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's stronghold in Baghdad's Sadr City slum.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 9, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Insurgents unleashed a combined mortar and car bomb attack in Samarra yesterday that killed five U.S. soldiers and two Iraqi National Guardsmen, sparking an afternoon of clashes and firefights in the Sunni Triangle city. The outbreak of violence, one of the fiercest exchanges between U.S. troops and insurgents since the U.S.-led coalition relinquished sovereignty nearly two weeks ago, came just a day after Iraq's interim government vowed to crush the 15-month- old resistance with a host of tougher security measures, including the power to impose martial law. Guerrillas attacked a building used as sleeping quarters by U.S. 1st Infantry Division troops and Iraqi National Guard soldiers, firing at least 38 mortar rounds at the building and detonating a car bomb outside the structure, said 1st Infantry Division Master Sgt. Robert Powell.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. military planners are drawing up contingency plans for sending more troops to Iraq, but Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that the top American military commander in the country reported he has a sufficient force to deal with the increased level of violence. Rumsfeld said he spoke with Gen. John Abizaid, commanding officer of U.S. Central Command, and was assured that the 134,000 U.S. troops can quell the recent attacks on coalition forces and the demonstrations that have swept through the country from the Sunni Triangle to the Shiite cities in the south.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. military planners are drawing up contingency plans for sending more troops to Iraq, but Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that the top American military commander in the country reported he has a sufficient force to deal with the increased level of violence. Rumsfeld said he spoke with Gen. John Abizaid, commanding officer of U.S. Central Command, and was assured that the 134,000 U.S. troops can quell the recent attacks on coalition forces and the demonstrations that have swept through the country from the Sunni Triangle to the Shiite cities in the south.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 9, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Insurgents unleashed a combined mortar and car bomb attack in Samarra yesterday that killed five U.S. soldiers and two Iraqi National Guardsmen, sparking an afternoon of clashes and firefights in the Sunni Triangle city. The outbreak of violence, one of the fiercest exchanges between U.S. troops and insurgents since the U.S.-led coalition relinquished sovereignty nearly two weeks ago, came just a day after Iraq's interim government vowed to crush the 15-month- old resistance with a host of tougher security measures, including the power to impose martial law. Guerrillas attacked a building used as sleeping quarters by U.S. 1st Infantry Division troops and Iraqi National Guard soldiers, firing at least 38 mortar rounds at the building and detonating a car bomb outside the structure, said 1st Infantry Division Master Sgt. Robert Powell.
NEWS
By Fawaz A. Gerges | April 4, 2004
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Since the capture of Saddam Hussein in December, a drumbeat of attacks across central and northern Iraq have claimed hundreds of Iraqi and American lives and have given little hope that the war is winding down. There are daily reports of insurgent attacks against Americans, Iraqi police and soft targets. In one day last week, four American contractors were killed in a rebel ambush in Fallujah and jubilant residents dragged charred corpses through the streets and hanged two of them from a bridge.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.