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By McClatchy-Tribune | April 10, 2009
BAGHDAD -Six years after the U.S. overthrew Saddam Hussein's government, tens of thousands of Iraqis gathered in the rain in Iraq's capital Thursday to mark the anniversary and renew calls for a U.S. withdrawal. The demonstrators came in response to calls by Muqtada al-Sadr, the influential Shiite cleric who has long decried the U.S. military's occupation, but there were also Sunni Muslims in the crowd. Draped in Iraqi flags and chanting, protesters packed Baghdad's Firdous Square, where six years ago a crowd cheered the destruction of a statue of Hussein.
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NEWS
By Feisal Abdul Rauf | October 1, 2013
Suddenly, after decades of impasse, it seems possible - just possible - that the stars are aligning for a comprehensive peace agreement in the Middle East. Three major developments are happening right now. Iran's new president, Hasan Rowhani, has made a peace overture after more than three decades of conflict with the United States. President Barack Obama's phone call to Mr. Rowhani was a breakthrough in diplomatic relations with Iran that have been frozen since 1979. The United States and Russia have brokered an agreement to rid Syria of chemical weapons.
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NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 26, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Large swaths of Iraq still remain outside the control of the interim government, major highways are fraught with attackers, and Prime Minister Ayad Allawi - along with the U.S. Embassy and much of the international community - must conduct business in fortified compounds guarded by tanks, blast walls and barbed wire. On Thursday, Allawi gave Congress an upbeat assessment of Iraq, but the situation on the ground is more complicated. Allawi said the Iraqi people were making steady progress in taking control of the nation's affairs.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 10, 2009
BAGHDAD -Six years after the U.S. overthrew Saddam Hussein's government, tens of thousands of Iraqis gathered in the rain in Iraq's capital Thursday to mark the anniversary and renew calls for a U.S. withdrawal. The demonstrators came in response to calls by Muqtada al-Sadr, the influential Shiite cleric who has long decried the U.S. military's occupation, but there were also Sunni Muslims in the crowd. Draped in Iraqi flags and chanting, protesters packed Baghdad's Firdous Square, where six years ago a crowd cheered the destruction of a statue of Hussein.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 10, 2007
Here's what has to be some bad news for the folks at Maryland's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services: Priscilla Doggett is sticking to her guns. Last week, I wrote about all those questions still unanswered in the death of corrections Officer David McGuinn, who was fatally stabbed in July of 2006 at the Maryland House of Correction. The House of Correction has since been shut down and its staff and inmates dispersed throughout the system. The prison is gone, but allegations that McGuinn was on an inmate hit list, had been threatened and reassigned off the housing units and then put back in the housing units, remain.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI and BORZOU DARAGAHI,LOS ANGELES TIME | February 25, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraqi political and religious leaders struggled yesterday to pull the nation back from the brink of sectarian civil war, calling for peace and extending through today a daytime curfew meant to reduce the level of violence between Shiite and Sunni Muslims that has left more than 150 people dead this week. Joint Sunni-Shiite prayer services were broadcast on television. Government security forces flooded the streets, beefing up protection of mosques and other religious sites.
NEWS
By MEGAN K. STACK and MEGAN K. STACK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 24, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Gunmen shot 47 people to death at a fake checkpoint north of Baghdad yesterday. The number of fatalities across Iraq climbed past 100 in sectarian attacks after the bombing of one of Shiite Islam's holiest sites. With escalating violence between Shiite and Sunni Muslims convulsing the nation and raising fears of civil war, Iraqi officials ordered an unusual daytime curfew today in Baghdad and nearby provinces. The move is expected to keep people away from Friday prayer services in areas with mixed Shiite and Sunni Muslim populations.
NEWS
By Feisal Abdul Rauf | October 1, 2013
Suddenly, after decades of impasse, it seems possible - just possible - that the stars are aligning for a comprehensive peace agreement in the Middle East. Three major developments are happening right now. Iran's new president, Hasan Rowhani, has made a peace overture after more than three decades of conflict with the United States. President Barack Obama's phone call to Mr. Rowhani was a breakthrough in diplomatic relations with Iran that have been frozen since 1979. The United States and Russia have brokered an agreement to rid Syria of chemical weapons.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI and BORZOU DARAGAHI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 11, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Some clerics issued calls for calm and others issued calls to defend communities yesterday as at least 18 more Iraqis and a U.S. Marine were killed in a nation grappling with an anti-government insurgency and continuing sectarian violence between Shiite and Sunni Muslims. In the capital, during the first Muslim day of worship without a vehicle ban since the Feb. 22 bombing of a Shiite shrine in Samarra and subsequent reprisals that left hundreds dead, Sheik Jalaladin Sagheer of the Baratha Mosque told his Shiite followers that the battle against terrorism has no limits.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 4, 2007
DEARBORN, Mich. -- Twice recently, vandals have shattered windows at three mosques and a dozen businesses popular among Shiite Muslims along Warren Avenue, the spine of the Arab community here. Although the police have arrested no one, most in Dearborn's Iraqi Shiite community blame the Sunni Muslims. "The Shiites were very happy that they killed Saddam, but the Sunnis were in tears," Aqeel Al-Tamimi, 34, an immigrant Iraqi truck driver and a Shiite, said as he ate roasted chicken and flatbread at Al-Akashi restaurant, one of the establishments damaged over the city line in Detroit.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 10, 2007
Here's what has to be some bad news for the folks at Maryland's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services: Priscilla Doggett is sticking to her guns. Last week, I wrote about all those questions still unanswered in the death of corrections Officer David McGuinn, who was fatally stabbed in July of 2006 at the Maryland House of Correction. The House of Correction has since been shut down and its staff and inmates dispersed throughout the system. The prison is gone, but allegations that McGuinn was on an inmate hit list, had been threatened and reassigned off the housing units and then put back in the housing units, remain.
NEWS
By Raed Rafei and Raed Rafei,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2007
TRIPOLI, Lebanon -- The cleric's question echoed off the walls of the mosque in one of Tripoli's poorest neighborhoods - and well beyond. "What is happening to our community?" Sheik Mazen Mohammed cried. "Where are we heading?" Many of Lebanon's Sunni Muslims, especially in the northern part of the country, are asking themselves the same question Mohammed posed during prayers on a recent Friday. The Sunni community has been fractured by a battle between the country's army and an extremist Sunni group inspired by al-Qaida, and an ensuing crackdown by the government against Islamists.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 25, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A group claiming to be affiliated with al-Qaida claimed responsibility yesterday for a suicide car bomb that killed nine U.S. soldiers and wounded 20 others in one of the deadliest single attacks against American troops in Iraq. Islamic State of Iraq, a coalition of Sunni Muslim militant groups, posted an Internet message vowing to launch additional attacks. The claims could not be verified. The group also boasted it had developed "new strategies for explosions" that would allow it to penetrate U.S. and Iraqi security lines.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 4, 2007
DEARBORN, Mich. -- Twice recently, vandals have shattered windows at three mosques and a dozen businesses popular among Shiite Muslims along Warren Avenue, the spine of the Arab community here. Although the police have arrested no one, most in Dearborn's Iraqi Shiite community blame the Sunni Muslims. "The Shiites were very happy that they killed Saddam, but the Sunnis were in tears," Aqeel Al-Tamimi, 34, an immigrant Iraqi truck driver and a Shiite, said as he ate roasted chicken and flatbread at Al-Akashi restaurant, one of the establishments damaged over the city line in Detroit.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI and BORZOU DARAGAHI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 11, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Some clerics issued calls for calm and others issued calls to defend communities yesterday as at least 18 more Iraqis and a U.S. Marine were killed in a nation grappling with an anti-government insurgency and continuing sectarian violence between Shiite and Sunni Muslims. In the capital, during the first Muslim day of worship without a vehicle ban since the Feb. 22 bombing of a Shiite shrine in Samarra and subsequent reprisals that left hundreds dead, Sheik Jalaladin Sagheer of the Baratha Mosque told his Shiite followers that the battle against terrorism has no limits.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI and BORZOU DARAGAHI,LOS ANGELES TIME | February 25, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraqi political and religious leaders struggled yesterday to pull the nation back from the brink of sectarian civil war, calling for peace and extending through today a daytime curfew meant to reduce the level of violence between Shiite and Sunni Muslims that has left more than 150 people dead this week. Joint Sunni-Shiite prayer services were broadcast on television. Government security forces flooded the streets, beefing up protection of mosques and other religious sites.
NEWS
By Raed Rafei and Raed Rafei,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2007
TRIPOLI, Lebanon -- The cleric's question echoed off the walls of the mosque in one of Tripoli's poorest neighborhoods - and well beyond. "What is happening to our community?" Sheik Mazen Mohammed cried. "Where are we heading?" Many of Lebanon's Sunni Muslims, especially in the northern part of the country, are asking themselves the same question Mohammed posed during prayers on a recent Friday. The Sunni community has been fractured by a battle between the country's army and an extremist Sunni group inspired by al-Qaida, and an ensuing crackdown by the government against Islamists.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - As U.S. Marines prepare to return to the Iraqi city of Fallujah, scene of the grisly killings of four American security workers on Wednesday, there is growing fear in both Washington and Baghdad that the insurgency centered in the Sunni Triangle could swell into a general uprising. Yesterday, clerics in the city condemned the desecration of the bodies as violations of Islamic law - but said nothing of the killings themselves. The Sunni anger is reflected in a new poll that said seven out of 10 Iraqis who live in the region where the four Americans were killed and their bodies mutilated think attacking coalition forces is acceptable behavior.
NEWS
By MEGAN K. STACK and MEGAN K. STACK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 24, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Gunmen shot 47 people to death at a fake checkpoint north of Baghdad yesterday. The number of fatalities across Iraq climbed past 100 in sectarian attacks after the bombing of one of Shiite Islam's holiest sites. With escalating violence between Shiite and Sunni Muslims convulsing the nation and raising fears of civil war, Iraqi officials ordered an unusual daytime curfew today in Baghdad and nearby provinces. The move is expected to keep people away from Friday prayer services in areas with mixed Shiite and Sunni Muslim populations.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 4, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi lawmakers broke a logjam that for weeks had blocked the formation of the new government, voting overwhelmingly yesterday to elect a Sunni Muslim as speaker of the National Assembly. A Shiite Muslim and an ethnic Kurd were elected as his deputies. The step was the first of three required to set up the government but appeared to signal that the intense behind-the-scenes wrangling since the Jan. 30 elections had begun to yield results. The next steps - the election of a council made up of a president and two vice presidents, and that group's selection of a prime minister, who must be approved by the assembly - probably will be completed by the weekend, the second anniversary of the Iraq war's official end. The prime minister will select a Cabinet a week or two after that, lawmakers said.
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