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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Colonial Players' second offering of its 64th season is Sharr White's 2009 award-winning play "Sunlight. " This enduring all-volunteer company's bold choice of a topical drama examining controversial issues is laudable, although its timing, when many people are experiencing presidential election overload, seems awkward. "Sunlight" illuminates the evolution of one family after 9/11. The father, Matthew Gibbon, is an eccentric, aging liberal lion who for 30 years has served as president of a midsize college.
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NEWS
August 12, 2013
Thank you Maryland, you've been great. But the best part of you will be seeing you in my rearview mirror for the final time. I can't understand how citizens stand idly by and allow themselves to be taxed nonstop by their current governor, Martin "Owe-Malley. " The rain tax takes more of our money that we can afford. What's next, a sunlight tax? Gun control? How is it that less than 30 minutes away a Virginia resident can purchase a firearm and take possession the same day? Look at their gun crime rates compared to those of Maryland, where we have strict gun control laws in place that do nothing to curtail criminal activity but penalize law-abiding citizens.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 2005
On the bright side, one of the great things about the Baltimore restaurant scene is that quirky, funky, play-by-their-own rules restaurants like Sunlight still exist. To enjoy a meal at this little Ethiopian restaurant in Fells Point, it's necessary to suspend many of the usual expectations one might have at a restaurant -- that you'll get what you order, that it will arrive in less than an hour, and that you'll be able to cool the fire in your mouth with regularly refilled water glasses.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Colonial Players' second offering of its 64th season is Sharr White's 2009 award-winning play "Sunlight. " This enduring all-volunteer company's bold choice of a topical drama examining controversial issues is laudable, although its timing, when many people are experiencing presidential election overload, seems awkward. "Sunlight" illuminates the evolution of one family after 9/11. The father, Matthew Gibbon, is an eccentric, aging liberal lion who for 30 years has served as president of a midsize college.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1998
Finding that exposure to sunlight increases the risk of cataracts, researchers recommended yesterday that everyone use sunglasses, hats and other steps year-round to cut down on harmful rays.Scientists had known from earlier studies that people who work outdoors, such as Maryland watermen, developed more cataracts than people with less sunlight exposure.But until now, researchers didn't know whether ultraviolet-B rays posed a cataract risk to the general population.Sheila West, a Hopkins professor who was the study's author, said she expected to find deterioration after a high level of exposure.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 1998
MOSCOW -- A few months from now, an object will appear suddenly in the night sky and unfold glistening panels like an insect unfurling new wings.Slowly it will rotate and aim a blinding ray at Earth. The beam will roam over the globe's surface, seeking out population centers: southern Europe, Houston, maybe Los Angeles.It's the latest from the Mir space station. In a project that seems to borrow equally from James Bond and Flash Gordon, the Russians are preparing to place a huge mirror in orbit about 230 miles above Earth.
NEWS
By Elizabeth A. Shack and Elizabeth A. Shack,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - It's poised at Maryland's borders, 15 feet tall with sap that causes skin to blister and burn in sunlight. Giant hogweed, whose scientific name is Heracleum mantegazzianum, has been found in Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia, and officials fear it could migrate into Maryland and become a public health hazard. It is related to carrots and parsley, but the white-flowered hogweed can grow up to 20 feet high with 5-foot-wide leaves. While carrot and parsley leaves can cause rashes in people sensitive to them, the sap of the giant hogweed makes skin more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and causes severe burns and blisters, said Alan Tasker, coordinator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Federal Noxious Weed Program.
NEWS
April 14, 2006
TV PICK--Dimming Sun-- Increasing air pollution allows less sunlight to reach Earth, a "dimming" linked to severe droughts. (MPT, Tuesday, 8 p.m.)
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | July 19, 2008
Donald Gansauer writes from Canton: "Your column often reports on the transits of the International Space Station ... I made sure to look for it. Was it reflected sunlight that I saw, or is there an actual light bulb on the station that gleams on the Earth?" Like Motel 6? "We'll leave the light on for ya..." Nah. It's all just sunlight, reflected off the station's solar panels and other shiny surfaces. That's why the ISS often "disappears" suddenly when it moves into Earth's shadow.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Sun Reporter // Weather Blogger | January 16, 2010
S tacey Dawes writes from Dundalk : " I've noticed that the time of the daily sunrise has been stuck at around 7:25 p.m. since mid-December. I thought we would be gaining some morning sunlight once we passed the winter solstice ." The sun's not stuck. The latest sunrise is Jan. 4, not at the solstice. Baltimore's sunrise advanced from 7:19 a.m. Dec. 15 to 7:27 Jan. 4. Now it's retreating, and we're gaining a few seconds of sunlight each morning. By month's end, we'll be gaining about a minute a day. > Read Frank Roylance's blog on MarylandWeather.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
Stacey Dawes writes from Dundalk: "I've noticed that the time of the daily sunrise has been stuck at around 7:25 p.m. since mid-December. I thought we would be gaining some morning sunlight once we passed the winter solstice." The sun's not stuck. The latest sunrise is Jan. 4, not at the solstice. Baltimore's sunrise advanced from 7:19 a.m. Dec. 15 to 7:27 Jan. 4. Now it's retreating, and we're gaining a few seconds of sunlight each morning. By month's end, we'll be gaining about a minute a day.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg , Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2009
As you look across an inlet to the circular domed building at the water's edge, clusters of pink flowers tug your gaze back toward the foreground. Whether or not you have visited the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, it's instantly recognizable. And the profusion of color framing your view means the 3,000 cherry blossom trees are in bloom. You have been transported to another time and place, yet you are staring at a wall. That is what a painting can do: effortlessly take your mind on a journey without loading it down with a body to lug around.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | May 8, 2009
Imagine having a virtually limitless supply of clean, renewable fuel to run our cars and trucks, a fuel produced from something as noxious and seemingly useless as pond scum. Fantastic as that may sound, it's no pipe dream to Algenol Biofuels. The three-year-old company aims to make ethanol with blue-green algae, by feeding it a steady diet of carbon dioxide and farm animal waste. A dark horse in a crowded field vying to develop a new generation of biofuels, Algenol is based in Florida, but its research arm is in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
Though it's a center-unit townhouse, the four-level Bolton Hill home of Mary Hebdon and Dr. Matthew Hebdon is illuminated by natural light from top to bottom. A large skylight over the main staircase brings sun throughout the center of the house. "When it's a sunny day, it fills the rooms," Mary Hebdon says. The house has large windows that bring in more light. Those in the living room that face the street are about 8 feet tall. Two levels of the house have big bow windows that capture sunlight above the garden out back.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | February 2, 2009
The last time NASA sent people to the moon, they landed somewhere near the moon's equator. It was simpler to get home from there and safer for those early missions. But as NASA plans to return astronauts to the moon in the coming decades, it is the moon's north and south poles that scientists and engineers are aiming for - drawn by the prospect of perpetual sunlight, water ice, intriguing geology and a gentler environment. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab will help the agency prepare for those missions.
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