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TRAVEL
By Brooks Welsh, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
I recently caught up with Adam "Ace" Moyer, the CEO and founder of Knockaround, a maker of sunglasses that offer inexpensive and relaxed shades, perfect for the beach. Moyer is a native of the Northern Virginia, and was relaxing in Bethany Beach when we caught up with him about the shades, their design and the future of the brand. Ace, you grew up in this area and your parents also have a beach house in Delaware. How has the mix of being near big cities like D.C. and Baltimore, as well as spending time at the beach, influenced your work as an artist and a designer?
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
We slather on sunscreen and sport our shades during the sunny summer months. But Dr. Francisco Burgos at Katzen Eye Group says we should also be wearing sunglasses in the winter. The practice's director of refractive surgery services and comprehensive eye care says ultraviolet light can damage eyes at any time of the year. How can UV rays damage the eyes? UV light is electromagnetic radiation that is not visible to the human eye. There are several different types of UV light.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 15, 2011
The headline pretty much says it all. Brewers first baseman Prince Fielder, who should be the Orioles' top target during the offseason, came to the ballpark unprepared Thursday. With the sun in his eyes, he rushed to the Brewers dugout for sunglasses. When his teammates had nothing to give him, he got a little help from a fan. I'm not sure why the Rockies fan wanted to help out an opposing player, but it was a pretty cool moment.
TRAVEL
By Brooks Welsh, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
I recently caught up with Adam "Ace" Moyer, the CEO and founder of Knockaround, a maker of sunglasses that offer inexpensive and relaxed shades, perfect for the beach. Moyer is a native of the Northern Virginia, and was relaxing in Bethany Beach when we caught up with him about the shades, their design and the future of the brand. Ace, you grew up in this area and your parents also have a beach house in Delaware. How has the mix of being near big cities like D.C. and Baltimore, as well as spending time at the beach, influenced your work as an artist and a designer?
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Baltimore mega-church pastor Jamal Bryant had fashion on his mind Monday, first condemning "Slave Adidas" and then saying sunglasses have no place in church. Bryant, pastor of Empowerment Temple and also an increasing player on the national scene, often at the side of Trayvon Martin's parents, is an avid Tweeter with a following of nearly 100,000 people. He had nothing good to say about the controversial shoes known as "slave Adidas," suede athletic shoes with plastic shackles that clamp onto the shin like an accessory.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
We slather on sunscreen and sport our shades during the sunny summer months. But Dr. Francisco Burgos at Katzen Eye Group says we should also be wearing sunglasses in the winter. The practice's director of refractive surgery services and comprehensive eye care says ultraviolet light can damage eyes at any time of the year. How can UV rays damage the eyes? UV light is electromagnetic radiation that is not visible to the human eye. There are several different types of UV light.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | June 5, 1991
Buying a pair of nonprescription sunglasses used to be a simple task. You'd slip into a dimestore on the run and pick up something inexpensive, or, if you chose to spend a few minutes and a few pennies more, you might find a pair that would last through August.Now, with heightened public concern about damaging sunlight, expanded technology in plastics and a deluge of designer labels -- and prices -- on everything from sweatbands to sneakers, shopping for sunglasses is turning into a monumental chore.
FEATURES
By Anthony Giorgianni and Anthony Giorgianni,The Hartford Courant | July 14, 1992
They have been accessories of the famous and rich, Secret Service agents, cool dudes and even saxophone-playing presidential candidates.protection. Many low-cost sunglasses work just fine, medical experts and industry representatives say.In fact, for those wearing prescription eyeglasses, there's a good chance their clear lenses -- especially if they are plastic -- are screening out most of UV.Contact lenses also filter out a substantial amount of UV...
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | July 25, 1995
Q: Recently, my pediatrician surprised me by suggesting that my children wear sunglasses when they are outside. We know about sunscreen but if they don't look directly at the sun, what is the need for sunglasses?A: Your pediatrician is quite right to insist on sunglasses. Just as ultraviolet rays can damage the skin over time, so, too, can these same rays injure a child's eyes.As your question suggests, most everyone knows that directly looking at the sun allows high energy wavelengths of visible light to pass directly to the retina and damage it. However, infants and children under age 10 have less light-absorbing materials (called chromophores)
NEWS
By Lisa Lytle and Lisa Lytle,Orange County Register | May 30, 1993
Imagine all the people . . . wearing John Lennon-inspired sunglasses. This spring and summer, fashion gets back to where it once belonged -- the late '60s and '70s -- with the return of the former Beatle's round-frame, tinted-lens style.The new versions offer not only style but advances in technology: They're lighter and therefore more comfortable. Most brands provide protection from ultraviolet rays."It's definitely part of the '60s and '70s bell-bottoms-pop art feel to fashion right now," says Heather Adams, optician and manager at l. a. Eyeworks, a boutique for cutting-edge eyewear in Orange County, Calif.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Baltimore mega-church pastor Jamal Bryant had fashion on his mind Monday, first condemning "Slave Adidas" and then saying sunglasses have no place in church. Bryant, pastor of Empowerment Temple and also an increasing player on the national scene, often at the side of Trayvon Martin's parents, is an avid Tweeter with a following of nearly 100,000 people. He had nothing good to say about the controversial shoes known as "slave Adidas," suede athletic shoes with plastic shackles that clamp onto the shin like an accessory.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 15, 2011
The headline pretty much says it all. Brewers first baseman Prince Fielder, who should be the Orioles' top target during the offseason, came to the ballpark unprepared Thursday. With the sun in his eyes, he rushed to the Brewers dugout for sunglasses. When his teammates had nothing to give him, he got a little help from a fan. I'm not sure why the Rockies fan wanted to help out an opposing player, but it was a pretty cool moment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Robert Lee "Bob" Bell, who began his career in auto sales in the 1950s and went on to own the Bob Bell Automotive Group, one of the state's largest car dealers, died Sunday of leukemia at theUniversity of Maryland Medical Center. The Ellicott City resident, who earlier had lived in Laurel, was 78. Born and raised in Alexandria, Va., Mr. Bell was appointed a Capitol Hill U.S. Senate page and graduated from the Senate Page School. "He was a page for Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn," said a daughter, Mary Catherine Bishop of Ellicott City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
She's been dubbed the queen of hip-hop, soul and R&B, but Mary J. Blige has also established herself as a style maven over the years. Wednesday, she will make an appearance at Nordstrom in Towson Town Center to promote the new line of her Melodies by MJB sunglasses. Fans of Blige will also have the opportunity to have their photograph taken with the songstress if they purchase the sunglasses, which range from $165 to $225. It will come as no surprise to those who have followed the career of the nine-time Grammy Award-winner, that she would launch an eyewear line.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2010
Another article in a series about the people and the jobs that define a Maryland summer. Conor Sheehey has heard the "Baywatch" jokes. All of them, thank you. No, the 19-year-old lifeguard doesn't run in slow motion. Most of the swimmers he supervises don't have camera-ready physiques or model looks. (No offense.) And he's usually taking in the view from a sun-shaded, 6-foot perch overlooking a pool, not the sands of a California beach. But like his fictional TV counterparts, Sheehey is all business when he's sitting in the chair.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Sun | July 6, 2008
We found artist Michel Modell, 37, kicking up her heels at "Chef's EpiCUREan Evening" - a gourmet dinner at the home of Ed and Katherine St. John, benefiting Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. "Some days, you feel great and you can really put it together. And some days, you're barely getting out the door in something that matches," she says. Age: 37 Residence: Owings Mills Job: Artist Self-described style: "Quirky and classic." The look: Blumarine, stretch-silk, leopard-print sheath with jeweled neckline.
FEATURES
June 20, 1996
The task of choosing sunglasses is multifaceted. Sunglasses must be practical enough to protect our eyes, yet stylish enough to make us want to wear them. The American Academy of Ophthalmology offers some tips:Label: Although universal federal regulations for ultraviolet light and sunglasses do not exist, most sunglasses carry a label stating their protective ability. The academy recommends glasses that block 99-100% of UV light (both UV-A and UV-B).Wrap-around: Especially if you expect to be in the sun a great deal, wrap-around, close-fitting sunglasses will provide the most protection for your eyes by preventing light from entering through the sides.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 22, 1993
The strange phenomenon of people wearing sunglasses at night or indoors doesn't really make sense, but lots of people do things just for the sake of style.This summer's most popular sunglasses have wire frames and rectangular or oval lenses. The lenses come in a variety of colors, including amber, maroon and violet, and the glasses cost from $5 to $100 -- depending on whether you pick them up at a street vendor's or a department store.Wire-frame sunglasses, especially granny glasses, are perfect for the retro hippie look.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | February 3, 2008
Zeal Optics makes great sunglasses. But the Tensai model ($130) isn't meant for wide, open faces. Like all Zeal sunglasses, these are perfect for fly fishermen, who require superior contrast and depth perception, and bikers and runners, who need shades that won't slip off when the sweat pours out. Nonslip nose and temple pads keep their grip, and the lightweight frames seem to disappear. Rather than the Tensai model, we're guessing most medium-size faces would be happier with Zeal's Maestro model at the same price - Outside magazine's 2006 Gear of the Year winner.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 8, 2006
I confess that when I first learned about the new $250 Oakley O ROKR sunglasses that also function as a cell phone and a music player, I thought they could be for me. I could envision myself tooling over the Bay Bridge in a glistening convertible, listening to tunes on my sunglasses, when a guy named Manny rings my shades and says, "Let's talk movie deals over sauteed soft crabs." Replying through my glasses, I would counter, "You got it babe, but I take my points off the gross, not the net."
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