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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
"I Used to be Darker," the latest movie from Baltimore's Matt Porterfield, will be shown at January's Sundance Film Festival, organizers announced Wednesday. "I was in a bit of a state of shock," said Porterfield, who was on a return bus trip from New York when he got the news. "I'm ecstatic. " The movie, Porterfield's third feature as a writer-director, tells the story of a runaway from Northern Ireland who moves in with her aunt and uncle in Baltimore, and the family crises that ensue.
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FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
The Sundance Film Festival kicks off in Park City, Utah, Jan. 16, which means a handful of LGBT-related movies will be making their premieres. Whether these flicks get picked up for distribution in theaters is another question entirely. But in the interest of being prepared, here's a look at a few of the festival's LGBT-focused offerings. "Love Is Strange": Director Ira Sachs' semi-autobiographical "Keep the Lights On" was a brutally honest film about an ill-fated gay relationship.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2004
Ann Claire Young, of New York, NY, was married to John Wesley Frisbie, of Queens, NY on December 13, 2003. The bride is the daughter of Neil and Nancy Young, of Lutherville, MD. She is a 1995 graduate of Franklin and Marshall College in PA and earned a Master's degree at the Tisch School of the Arts at NYU. The bridegroom is the son of Ms. Barbara Frisbie, of Houston, TX. He graduated in 1991 from the University of Texas in Austin, TX. The couple honeymooned...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Writer-director Michael Tully's "Ping Pong Summer," inspired by summer vacations in the Ocean City of the 1980s with his parents, will have its world premiere at January's Sundance Film festival. The movie was filmed in Ocean City in autumn 2012. Its cast includes Susan Sarandon, Lea Thompson, John Hannah and Amy Sedaris. A coming-of-age film set in 1985, "Ping Pong Summer" has been a years-long project for Tully, who says he's thrilled not just to have the movie finished, but to have it accepted at one of the country's premier showcases for independent film.
NEWS
April 30, 1996
Fred G. Sullivan Jr., 50, whose film "The Beer Drinker's Guide to Fitness and Film Making" acquired a cult following, died April 18 of heart failure in Saranac Lake, N.Y."The Beer Drinker's Guide" was a quirky self-portrait of the struggling filmmaker, his wife and four children. Released in 1988, it was first shown at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.He was working on a sequel at the time of his death.Robert Rade Stone, 68, a former city council president and fund-raiser for Serbian causes, died Friday of a heart attack in Pittsburgh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sylvia Badger | January 10, 1999
Jan. 12: A tribute to commemorate the 70th birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. 7:30 p.m. Tickets are free, but must be reserved by calling 410-783-8024.Jan. 14: Rob Tregenza, local independent filmmaker whose "Inside 1/8 Out" premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, will speak at a meeting of Women in Film and Video. Radisson 1/8 Cross Keys Inn. 6 p.m. Members free; nonmembers $10. Call 410-685-FILM.Jan. 16: The 13th annual Madhatters Ball. L'Hirondelle Club in Ruxton.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Writer-director Michael Tully's "Ping Pong Summer," inspired by summer vacations in the Ocean City of the 1980s with his parents, will have its world premiere at January's Sundance Film festival. The movie was filmed in Ocean City in autumn 2012. Its cast includes Susan Sarandon, Lea Thompson, John Hannah and Amy Sedaris. A coming-of-age film set in 1985, "Ping Pong Summer" has been a years-long project for Tully, who says he's thrilled not just to have the movie finished, but to have it accepted at one of the country's premier showcases for independent film.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mercedes Suarez | May 30, 2002
Celebrate the beginning of June with a trip this weekend to the ninth annual Frederick Festival of the Arts. On tap are a variety of artwork and films, live music and theater, outdoor activities and good food. The work of 150 jury-selected fine artists and craftspeople will be on view and for sale. Two stages will offer live music, theater and dance. Performers include the music group Groovelilly, poet Michael Mack and the Shakespeare Project. Want to enjoy the outdoors? Kayaks and canoes are available for rent in Carroll Creek Linear Park, where the festival will be held.
ENTERTAINMENT
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 23, 2005
Just which film (or films) may be a breakout hit from the 2005 Sundance Film Festival, now under way in Utah, remains to be seen. But the 2004 festival turned out to be a commercial, if not necessarily artistic, breakthrough. The highest grossing film of the 2003 fest was The Cooler at $8.3 million. Six 2004 films dwarfed that mark. Here's how several of last year's notable Sundance films fared (in gross box office receipts for North America): Saw: Lions Gate scored a whopping $55 million with James Wan's low-budget horror film and is preparing a sequel.
EXPLORE
October 13, 2011
Harford County is hardly Tinsel Town. The closest places to Bel Air named Hollywood are in St. Mary's County on Maryland's very lower Western Shore and in Carbon County, Pa., not too far from Scranton, backdrop for the hit TV series "The Office. " Yet Bel Air, for the third year in a row, will be the scene of a film festival come the weekend of Oct. 21-23, and it will feature fare found at the Sundance Film Festival and other venues that specialize in celluloid offerings of a more cerebral timbre than the typical summer smashes and seasonal blockbusters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Matt Porterfield's new film, "I Used To Be Darker," has been a festival favorite abroad. But soon Baltimore will get the first wider-release peek. According to a statement, the Baltimore director's third film will have its national opening in Baltimore Sept. 27. Porterfield told us that Strand Releasing has agreed to let Baltimore get first dibs on the film, before New York and Los Angeles. The film is scheduled to open at The Charles Theatre. It also screened at the Maryland Film Festival in May. Porterfield, who won the Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2011, has garnered acclaim for his films "Hamilton" and "Putty Hill," both set and filmed in and around Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
"I Used to be Darker," the latest movie from Baltimore's Matt Porterfield, will be shown at January's Sundance Film Festival, organizers announced Wednesday. "I was in a bit of a state of shock," said Porterfield, who was on a return bus trip from New York when he got the news. "I'm ecstatic. " The movie, Porterfield's third feature as a writer-director, tells the story of a runaway from Northern Ireland who moves in with her aunt and uncle in Baltimore, and the family crises that ensue.
EXPLORE
October 13, 2011
Harford County is hardly Tinsel Town. The closest places to Bel Air named Hollywood are in St. Mary's County on Maryland's very lower Western Shore and in Carbon County, Pa., not too far from Scranton, backdrop for the hit TV series "The Office. " Yet Bel Air, for the third year in a row, will be the scene of a film festival come the weekend of Oct. 21-23, and it will feature fare found at the Sundance Film Festival and other venues that specialize in celluloid offerings of a more cerebral timbre than the typical summer smashes and seasonal blockbusters.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Turan and Kenneth Turan,Tribune Newspapers | January 22, 2010
The Sundance Film Festival, which set up shop in Park City, Utah, this week, is more than a festival: It's a delicate balancing act. This is an institution that walks the line between two competing notions of what a celebration of cinema should be, straddling as best it can a gap that is especially evident this year. What Sundance is eternally caught between is the Scylla and Charybdis of commerce and art. Its proximity to Hollywood and its success at premiering audience-friendly independent films (for instance, last year's "An Education" and "Precious")
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | September 8, 2009
For five seasons, Sonja Sohn played Detective Kima Greggs on HBO's "The Wire," the gritty Baltimore crime drama. It was a breakthrough role for Sohn, who came from a troubled upbringing in Virginia and went from poet to actress. But on a recent weeknight, Sohn was not on a Hollywood film set. She was at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, speaking on a cell phone to the facilitator of a GED program, trying to figure out why 21-year-old Sean Hawkins hasn't been attending. She sat Hawkins down and crouched at his feet.
NEWS
By Ellen McCarthy and Ellen McCarthy,The Washington Post | April 24, 2009
On a recent day, Emma Roberts is waiting for those fateful college admission letters to come in. It's spring, so they should be arriving any day now. And it's all very exciting and unnerving, but at least for the moment she has a press junket to provide merciful distraction. Instead of waiting at the mailbox, Roberts can spend the day talking about Lymelife, the melancholy independent film she made with Alec Baldwin, Cynthia Nixon and a couple of the Culkin brothers. And she can chat about how she doesn't want to be stuck in a pop-princess Nickelodeon box the rest of her life but also still loves those roles and loves the legions of little girls who love her. She is 18 and, like anyone reaching adulthood, eager to move forward, but loath to release the sweetest vestiges of her past.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | January 26, 2007
Critiquing American culture is tricky for people in the family newspaper business, especially this week as two controversial movies open at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. I shall try to be discreet. One film, Hounddog, starring 12-year-old Dakota Fanning, involves the rape of a child. The other, Zoo, concerns - how to put it - an "equine brothel" wherein certain activities lead to a curious death. Zoo is based on a real-life incident in Enumclaw, Wash., in 2005, and stars - oh, who cares?
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