Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSundance
IN THE NEWS

Sundance

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By John Hartl and John Hartl,Seattle Times | January 18, 1995
The international film-festival year used to begin in earnest with Berlin in February, but the increasing prominence of the Sundance Film Festival has turned mid-January into the true starting point.Few 1995 films are as eagerly awaited as this year's Sundance opener: "Before Sunrise," written and directed by Richard Linklater, the talented Texas filmmaker who made "Slacker" and "Dazed and Confused."Starring Ethan Hawke as an American student who spends a day in Vienna with a French stranger (Julie Delpy)
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
The Sundance Film Festival kicks off in Park City, Utah, Jan. 16, which means a handful of LGBT-related movies will be making their premieres. Whether these flicks get picked up for distribution in theaters is another question entirely. But in the interest of being prepared, here's a look at a few of the festival's LGBT-focused offerings. "Love Is Strange": Director Ira Sachs' semi-autobiographical "Keep the Lights On" was a brutally honest film about an ill-fated gay relationship.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
By TRICIA BISHOP | December 23, 2001
The stars are coming to Utah this winter, but we're not talking about Olympic athletes. From Jan. 10 to 20, Sundance, Salt Lake City and Park City will show the more than 100 films selected for the 2002 Sundance Film Festival and play host to the celebrities and film fans who come to see them. Robert Redford's Sundance Resort in Sundance Village offers two packages for movie-goers: * Epic Package -- Available Jan. 11-20, the package includes five nights' lodging in a mountain suite (with a fireplace)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Writer-director Michael Tully's "Ping Pong Summer," inspired by summer vacations in the Ocean City of the 1980s with his parents, will have its world premiere at January's Sundance Film festival. The movie was filmed in Ocean City in autumn 2012. Its cast includes Susan Sarandon, Lea Thompson, John Hannah and Amy Sedaris. A coming-of-age film set in 1985, "Ping Pong Summer" has been a years-long project for Tully, who says he's thrilled not just to have the movie finished, but to have it accepted at one of the country's premier showcases for independent film.
FEATURES
By Mark Caro and Mark Caro,Chicago Tribune | January 26, 2007
For independent film publicist Jeremy Walker, the final straw was seeing a movie star "hijack" one of his staffers for an entire afternoon at last year's Sundance Film Festival so he could score swag (i.e. freebies) at the various houses set up to lavish brand names upon celebrities. Walker also didn't appreciate the filmmaker who "freaked out" because he might have missed the opportunity to snag a gift bag supposedly worth $50,000 at a Sundance party. When stars and filmmakers worry more about goodies than promoting their films, that's a problem for Walker, who runs the New York-based publicity firm Jeremy Walker + Associates.
FEATURES
By Russell Smith and Russell Smith,Dallas Morning News | February 4, 1992
PARK CITY, Utah -- Buzz. That's the sound that film festivals make. It starts out soft, the hum of a honeybee, then builds into a cacophony of crickets -- each and every chirp an opinion. At the Sundance Film Festival, which has established itself as an important proving ground for American independent film, word of mouth can matter as much as awards.At last year's festival, insider opinion swelled for two unconventional films with gay themes, "Poison" and "Paris Is Burning," and helped pave the way to success on the art-house circuit.
FEATURES
By Robert S. Goald and Robert S. Goald,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 1997
Robert Redford's 13th annual Sundance Film Festival has developed into an American version of Cannes with traffic jams, towing, ticketing, over-flowing restaurants, film-ticket waiting lists and a nasty "Sundance" flu substituting for the hookers and snarly French waiters that make the Cote d'Azure such a pleasure. Nevertheless, Sundance was a film lover's paradise, with 127 feature films and shorts unspooling over its 10-day run that ended Sunday.Held in Park City, Utah -- an idyllic ski resort (and former mining town)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2003
A bunch of local folks are back in town after having lots of fun in the sun a week ago. And we're not talking Florida. We mean Utah. The Sundance Film Festival, to be exact. "The weather was twice as warm in Park City as it was in Baltimore," notes Karen Bokram. Not that she minded. The sunny 40-something-degree climate made for great skiing and celebrity sighting. More from the Girls' Life publisher/editor in a bit. Meanwhile, Maryland Film Festival founder/director Jed Dietz was working the fest, along with Maryland Film Office chief Jack Gerbes.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2003
PARK CITY, Utah - Jen Sachs plans to attend parties with fellow animators at the Sundance Film Festival. "I think you run into a lot of nice, hard-working, maybe obsessive-compulsive people," she said in a conversation this week at Park City Hotel. But her first priority is business. By Sunday, when the festival ends, Sachs, who grew up in and around Baltimore, will have screened her 11-minute movie, The Velvet Tigress, four times in the shorts competition. The Velvet Tigress, a headline-splattered glimpse of an infamous 1931 murder case, premiered at the Telluride Film Festival in September 2001.
FEATURES
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 16, 2007
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Simran Sethi knows what the stereotype of the environmental movement used to be. "Hemp-wearing, yurt-living, off-the-grid hippies," she said. "Either that or upper-middle-class white males. Those were pretty limited definitions of environmentalists - and none of them were any fun." On TV The Green premieres at 9 p.m. tomorrow on the Sundance Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Forget the stars. The people I always wanted to talk to were the writers and producers who created the fictional worlds that became long-running TV series. One of the great pleasures of this job in my earlier days on the beat was going out to California, breaking away from my colleagues on the press tour and spending a long afternoon in a producer's bungalow on a studio backlot as he or she told me and my tape recorder how their visions became prime-time series. Whether it was Steven Bochco talking about “Hill Street Blues” or Larry Gelbart explaining the history of “M*A*S*H,” I always felt as if I was being let in on a great secret as to how entertainment, culture and sometimes even art was improbably created in the hyper-commercial world of Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 6, 2013
Midseason used to be a time for networks to put on series that weren't good enough to make the fall lineup. The thinking was: The money has been spent to make these episodes, so let's try to get something out of them by plugging them for shows that have bombed. But thanks to cable and huge changes in the way that people access and watch TV, midseason is in many ways now the best season for TV viewing. This is especially true when it comes to drama, the genre that network television has by and large abandoned to cable, PBS and now Web operations like Netflix because it has been deemed too expensive and risky for efficient (read: cheap)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
"I Used to be Darker," the latest movie from Baltimore's Matt Porterfield, will be shown at January's Sundance Film Festival, organizers announced Wednesday. "I was in a bit of a state of shock," said Porterfield, who was on a return bus trip from New York when he got the news. "I'm ecstatic. " The movie, Porterfield's third feature as a writer-director, tells the story of a runaway from Northern Ireland who moves in with her aunt and uncle in Baltimore, and the family crises that ensue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
This has been a good year for Baltimore representation in the New York theater scene. In March, Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey, the madcap acrobatic burlesque performers known for any number of adventures in Charm City, had their first off-Broadway show. This month, Michael Patrick Flanagan Smith, who directed some Baltimore ventures for that duo years ago, saw his play "Woody Guthrie Dreams" open off-off-Broadway. Although the Trixie/Monkey production of "All or Nothing" at the Ars Nova Theater was only for two weeks, a taste of it can be savored soon in an episode of "Unleashed by Garo" — that's fanciful fashion designer Garo Sparo — scheduled to air Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
When film star Robert Redford was starting the Sundance Festival in Utah in the late 1970s, there were times when he felt like a barker outside a seedy nightclub. "Sundance was a rocky road, and there were a lot of near-fatalities along the way," Redford told about 1,000 arts administrators who gathered in Baltimore this weekend for the half-century summit of the advocacy group Americans for the Arts. "When the festival started, it was just me and two other people. We had one theater, and I'd stand by the front door and urge people to give us a try. I felt like a man who works in a strip joint saying, 'Why don't you come on in?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2010
The Sundance Kid himself will be among the slew of glitterati stopping off in Baltimore next month to speak at the annual convention for Americans for the Arts. Robert Redford is among a roster of famous folk including filmmaker John Waters, avant-garde theater and opera director Peter Sellars, and blog founder Arianna Huffington scheduled to attend the convention sponsored by the advocacy group, Americans for the Arts, from June 24-27. Unfortunately, fans will have to be content with spotting the stars from the distance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sean P. Means and Sean P. Means,Salt Lake Tribune | January 18, 2004
PARK CITY, Utah -- The playwright Tom Stoppard once wrote that when people asked about the deep existential themes in his play Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, he felt "like a smuggler's dupe" standing before a customs officer: He had to admit those things were in there, but had no idea how they got there. Something similar happens every year at the Sundance Film Festival. And this year's festival, which opened Thursday and runs through Saturday, is no different. "The festival has, as usual, [created]
FEATURES
By Mark Caro and Mark Caro,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2003
PARK CITY, Utah - Sure, people are here to see, buy and sell movies, but what really gets the pulses racing is swag - or "schwag," as it's commonly pronounced. Swag is the name for gift bags that are handed out at parties. If a party-throwing organization wants to ensure a good crowd, it gets the word out that prime swag will be dispensed. A Sundance Channel party at Zoom, a Southwestern/eclectic restaurant at the bottom of Main Street, was known to be a major swag outlet. The party ran from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., but signs were up announcing that the gift bag wouldn't be available till 5 p.m., thus encouraging people to hang around.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | February 26, 2010
"Official Rejection," Paul Osborne's amusing and sometimes revelatory documentary about the grueling process of promoting low-budget independent movies, spends much of its 107-minute running time exposing the inequities and incompetence of some film festivals. Watching it, you often wonder: Grapes of wrath? Or sour grapes? Osborne, who wrote the script for director Scott Storm's feature "Ten 'til Noon," chronicles the team's pursuit of a Sundance slot before they entered their film in smaller festivals.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Turan and Kenneth Turan,Tribune Newspapers | January 22, 2010
The Sundance Film Festival, which set up shop in Park City, Utah, this week, is more than a festival: It's a delicate balancing act. This is an institution that walks the line between two competing notions of what a celebration of cinema should be, straddling as best it can a gap that is especially evident this year. What Sundance is eternally caught between is the Scylla and Charybdis of commerce and art. Its proximity to Hollywood and its success at premiering audience-friendly independent films (for instance, last year's "An Education" and "Precious")
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.