Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSun Readers
IN THE NEWS

Sun Readers

FEATURED ARTICLES
MOBILE
Baltimore Sun reporter | May 17, 2002
My Crab Cakes Ingredients: 1 lb. crabmeat 2 tsp. melted butter 4 tbs. mayonnaise 1 tsp. mustard 1 beaten egg 1/2 tsp. Old Bay Sprinkle and add some bread crumbs, or 1 slice of bread, torn into small pieces. Instructions: Form all into large hamburger-size pieces and place on a plate in refrigerator for a few hours. Spray a tinfoil-covered cookie sheet and place in oven at 350 degrees until light brown on both sides. --Pat Keefe, Pasadena Crab Cakes Ingredients: 1 lb. lump crabmeat 2 eggs 1 tbs. Worcestershire sauce 1 sprinkle Tabasco sauce 1/2 tsp. Old Bay 1 tsp. Horseradish 1 tbs. honey mustard 4 slices bread, no crust 1/4 cup mayonnaise Instructions: Mix all ingredients except crabmeat.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 24, 2014
As one of the hundreds of thousands who participated in the People's Climate March in New York City on Sunday, I am outraged that The Sun buried its coverage of this event on Page 6, beneath a blurry photo of participants ("Worldwide marches call for climate effort," Sept. 22). It began by stating that "thousands of people" participated and did not cite the lowest estimate of the actual turnout, 310,000, until the ninth paragraph, the same paragraph in which it also mentioned that U.N. Secretary Ban Ki Moon, former Vice President Al Gore and actor Leonardo DiCaprio participated.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
Cookouts aside, Labor Day is meant to celebrate the American workforce, and its achievements. But these days, even though people are more thankful than ever for their jobs, there's still room to gripe about the absurd, the mundane and the nearly unbelievable things they've done in exchange for a paycheck. Whether it's crazy responsibilities or a terrible boss, everyone seems to have a job-related tale of grief and woe. We invited Sun readers to share stories from their worst jobs.
NEWS
May 2, 2014
The Sun continues its 2014 Newsmaker Forum series with Charles Lollar, a businessman who is seeking the Republican nomination for governor. Mr. Lollar will join in a conversation with Sun readers about issues in the upcoming the gubernatorial race, moderated by Sun Editorial Page Editor Andrew A. Green. This spring, we have hosted similar events with other top candidates from both parties to give readers the opportunity to get in-depth answers to their questions about those vying to lead this state.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | February 13, 2005
THOMAS FRIEDMAN's syndicated columns have been missing from The Sun's Opinion/Commentary page since the beginning of the year, a fact that has made a number of readers unhappy. Friedman is perhaps the nation's most expert and influential newspaper foreign affairs columnist and is particularly strong on the Middle East. He works for The New York Times, and other newspapers buy his column through subscriptions to that newspaper's news service. In the process of trimming the 2005 newsroom budget, Sun editors re-examined all of the paper's wire service subscriptions and decided to switch to a less extensive and expensive package from the Times.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | June 12, 2005
SUN EDITORS make dozens of decisions each day as they produce the newspaper. Some, such as what to put on the front page and on the section fronts, receive more attention than others. Most decisions are made with the best information available and under a daily deadline, which means editors have a limited amount of time to ponder the mix of stories and photographs before putting a page together. Some readers, however, see hidden agendas in the editors' decision-making. They believe that editors seek to impart subliminal messages via their presentation of articles and pictures.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 4, 2012
As I write this, the thermometer indicates 17 degrees Farenheit in Baltimore, and Terry Reed's whereabouts are unknown. He's no longer at Union Memorial Hospital, where I saw him last, just before Christmas. Tuesday night, when I checked, he had not returned to his customary panhandling spot along President Street in downtown Baltimore. Perhaps he made it back to the North Avenue motel room he rents when he has enough money, or to the flophouse on Pennsylvania Avenue that charges him $50 a night.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | June 10, 2007
It was just a snapshot of a South African young man seated at his cluttered desk, smiling faintly. But the photo I took of Joshua Masekwameng last month captured him at a wonderful moment. He had just learned that his education in hotel management was secure, thanks to the generosity of Sun readers. Many readers responded to my short piece about Joshua on April 29. He used to live in a crowded shack and study by candlelight. He had passed the key high school "matric" exams and had started at Rosebank College.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1990
Shopping was the order of the day on this first official weekend of the Christmas shopping season for the majority of Evening Sun readers and other callers to SUNDIAL.Of the 391 who responded to yesterday's Evening Sun question of whether they did any Christmas shopping over the weekend 250 said they went shopping while 141 said they did not.Of the 250 who did some weekend shopping 204 said they purchased gifts while 46 said they only browsed."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinion but is not a scientific poll.
FEATURES
October 23, 1990
Today marks the debut of Accent on Health, The Evening Sun's new guide for healthy living.In addition to our regularly appearing Tuesday fare, we've added Newswatch on Health, a weekly digest of health news and notes, and Family Fare, recipes and a shopping list for a nutritious, fast and inexpensive meal for four.Family Forum, compiled by family beat reporter Mary Maushard, appears on Page C4.In addition, starting next Tuesday Dr. Solomon will answer your questions, in a once-a-week column written exclusively for Evening Sun readers.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
The Sun continues its 2014 Newsmaker Forum series with Larry Hogan, a businessman and former state cabinet official who is seeking the Republican nomination for governor. Mr. Hogan will join in a conversation with Sun readers about issues in the upcoming the gubernatorial race, moderated by Sun Editorial Page Editor Andrew A. Green. This spring, we have hosted similar events with other top candidates from both parties to give readers the opportunity to get in-depth answers to their questions about those vying to lead this state.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
The Sun continues its 2014 Newsmaker Forum series with Harford County Executive David Craig, who is seeking the Republican nomination for governor. Mr. Craig will join in a conversation with Sun readers about issues in the upcoming the gubernatorial race, moderated by Sun Editorial Page Editor Andrew A. Green. In the coming weeks, we will host similar events with other top candidates from both parties to give readers the opportunity to get in-depth answers to their questions about those vying to lead this state.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
The Sun continues its 2014 Newsmaker Forum series with Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who is seeking the Democratic nomination for governor. Mr. Gansler will join in a conversation with Sun readers about issues in the upcoming the gubernatorial race, moderated by Sun Editorial Page Editor Andrew A. Green. In the coming weeks, we will host similar events with other top candidates from both parties to give readers the opportunity to get in-depth answers to their questions about those vying to lead this state.
NEWS
January 6, 2014
The Sun kicks off its 2014 Newsmaker Forum series with Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who is seeking the Democratic nomination for governor. Mr. Brown will join in a conversation with Sun readers about issues in the upcoming General Assembly session and in the gubernatorial race, moderated by Sun Editorial Page Editor Andrew A. Green. In the coming weeks, we will host similar events with other top candidates from both parties to give readers the opportunity to get in-depth answers to their questions about those vying to lead this state.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 18, 2013
It is old-school, all right, but one of the traditions columnists observe at this time of year is to highlight a favorite charity, reminding readers who have donated in the past to do so again. So again this year I will focus on "Be a Santa to a Senior," a holiday fund-raising campaign to provide a little something to those who are the most vulnerable among us - the aging poor. It was begun a decade ago by Paul and Lori Hogan, founders of Home Instead Senior Care, which provides nonmedical, in-home care for seniors.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
I was almost tempted to admire both the irony - to say nothing of the audacity - of being accused of producing work flawed by "evidentiary problems" in a newspaper column ("Liberal media bias is beyond doubt," March 18) by a professor who cannot be bothered to produce a single scintilla of evidence to support his claim. But since it's my reputation at stake, my amusement was minimal. For the record, the work to which your guest columnist, Richard E. Vatz, refers: "What Liberal Media?
NEWS
March 22, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has been the subject of many stories this winter. From his penchant for replying in person or by letter to Marylanders who have criticized him, to his decision to go to Kuwait during the legislative session, to his feud with legislators, the governor's actions have been written about. The governor has told editors and others that he thinks the media, including The Evening Sun, have treated him unfairly.Of 1,502 Evening Sun readers and other callers to SUNDIAL yesterday, 764, or 50 percent, believe that the media have treated Schaefer unfairly, and 738, or 49 percent, said they feel that the media have not treated Schaefer unfairly.
NEWS
September 25, 1990
The Evening Sun asked its readers if they were in favor o property-tax caps after the Maryland Court of Appeals upheld the rights of voters to limit property taxes at the ballot box.609 Evening Sun readers and other callers to SUNDIAL were i favor of a tax cap while 324 callers did not favor a cap on taxes. When asked if they thought a cap would hinder local governments' ability to provide good public schools and services, 182 callers thought it would while 597 callers said it would not."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinion but is not a scientific poll.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.