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By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Household products maker Sun Products Corp. said Tuesday it wants to sell its Baltimore manufacturing plant, which ceased operations in June. The property was valued at $10,414,500 by the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation on Jan. 1. The company, the maker of products such as Dove and Snuggle, said in February it would close the facility, where it made fabric softener and liquid detergents, and lay off about 300 workers. In its announcement, it cited the age of the Holabird Avenue complex as a reason for moving operations to Kentucky.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Household products maker Sun Products Corp. said Tuesday it wants to sell its Baltimore manufacturing plant, which ceased operations in June. The property was valued at $10,414,500 by the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation on Jan. 1. The company, the maker of products such as Dove and Snuggle, said in February it would close the facility, where it made fabric softener and liquid detergents, and lay off about 300 workers. In its announcement, it cited the age of the Holabird Avenue complex as a reason for moving operations to Kentucky.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Household-product maker Sun Products said it will lay off 53 people next month at its manufacturing plant on Holabird Avenue in Southeast Baltimore. Spokeswoman Kathryn Corbally said the cuts, planned for May 13, are a result of the Connecticut-based company "realigning the manufacture of products with the customer base. " She wouldn't specify which products. The company's brands include laundry detergents such as all and Wisk, fabric softeners and dish detergent. Gerry Setley, vice president of the International Chemical Workers Union Council, which represents many of the plant's 350 workers, said the company is shifting its laundry detergent production across North America.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
The departure of Sun Products from Baltimore has rekindled letters and statements suggesting that Maryland's taxes are driving businesses out of the state ( "Sun Products move should be a wake-up call for tax-happy Md.," Feb. 13). No serious businessmen could make that statement. As a retired business CEO in Maryland, it is apparent to me that tax differentials between states are insignificant in a company's financial situation compared to other locational criteria. Location decisions are made primarily on the basis of demand for your products or services, the quality and adequacy of the local labor force, cost of materials, energy and transportation, location of markets, and quality of life that is increasingly important to attract talented employees.
NEWS
February 13, 2014
Thanks for putting the news about Sun Products closing it's plant in Baltimore and moving south on the front page ( "Sun Products to close city plant," Feb. 12). I have my doubts, but just maybe the legislators in Annapolis will now take their heads out of the sand and wake up to the fact that their high taxes on business and people and an unfriendly attitude toward businesses here that they and Gov. Martin O'Malley have created keep forcing some companies to make these decisions.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
The departure of Sun Products from Baltimore has rekindled letters and statements suggesting that Maryland's taxes are driving businesses out of the state ( "Sun Products move should be a wake-up call for tax-happy Md.," Feb. 13). No serious businessmen could make that statement. As a retired business CEO in Maryland, it is apparent to me that tax differentials between states are insignificant in a company's financial situation compared to other locational criteria. Location decisions are made primarily on the basis of demand for your products or services, the quality and adequacy of the local labor force, cost of materials, energy and transportation, location of markets, and quality of life that is increasingly important to attract talented employees.
FEATURES
By Nunzio Lupo and Nunzio Lupo,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 19, 1991
Assuming you a) never bought the idea that pale is in, and b) know all about the sun's harmful effects on your skin, you have only one choice if you still want that George Hamilton glow.Don't bake it; fake it.Cosmetic and chemical companies say counterfeit tanning has come a long way from the Beach Blanket Bingo days in 1960, when the granddoggie of all faux tan products debuted: QT Quick Tanning Lotion."Early versions of the product did tend to be streaky," says Doug Petkus, a spokesman for the manufacturer, "and I think orange might have been the dominant tone."
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Canton has traditionally been a blue-collar neighborhood, and for more than 100 years, the Canton Railroad Co. has been a part of that mix, moving freight for local industries and the port of Baltimore. Its locomotives are a familiar — and at times frustrating — sight for those traveling into Canton from the east, where the company's tracks crisscross Boston and O'Donnell streets. Long trains sometimes mean long waits for drivers. John C. Magness, the company's president and CEO, said the state-owned railroad's core mission continues.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
Regarding your article on the relocation of Sun Products Corp., you state that Baltimore "has lost two-thirds of its manufacturing jobs in the last 20 years" ( "Sun Products to close Baltimore manufacturing plant," Feb. 11). I couldn't help but notice who was running the city then. First it was former Mayor Martin O'Malley, who served a couple of terms on his way to The White house, then his sidekick, Sheila "I need some gift cards" Dixon, until she got convicted. Which brings us to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who seems more concerned with the murder rate than our economic state.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wright and Aaron Wright,aaron.wright@baltsun.com | June 7, 2009
Most young football players cringe at the idea of early-morning practices, except when they're led by Ray Lewis. More than 300 Baltimore kids gathered to get hands-on instruction from the Ravens linebacker at the Sun Products Corporation Youth Fitness Clinic at Patterson Park on Saturday, part of Lewis' fifth annual Ray's Summer Days fundraiser weekend. His personal trainer, Monte Sanders, and volunteers led the youngsters through numerous drills. Then the kids learned the importance of proper nutrition and leading a positive lifestyle.
NEWS
February 13, 2014
Thanks for putting the news about Sun Products closing it's plant in Baltimore and moving south on the front page ( "Sun Products to close city plant," Feb. 12). I have my doubts, but just maybe the legislators in Annapolis will now take their heads out of the sand and wake up to the fact that their high taxes on business and people and an unfriendly attitude toward businesses here that they and Gov. Martin O'Malley have created keep forcing some companies to make these decisions.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Canton has traditionally been a blue-collar neighborhood, and for more than 100 years, the Canton Railroad Co. has been a part of that mix, moving freight for local industries and the port of Baltimore. Its locomotives are a familiar — and at times frustrating — sight for those traveling into Canton from the east, where the company's tracks crisscross Boston and O'Donnell streets. Long trains sometimes mean long waits for drivers. John C. Magness, the company's president and CEO, said the state-owned railroad's core mission continues.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Household-product maker Sun Products said it will lay off 53 people next month at its manufacturing plant on Holabird Avenue in Southeast Baltimore. Spokeswoman Kathryn Corbally said the cuts, planned for May 13, are a result of the Connecticut-based company "realigning the manufacture of products with the customer base. " She wouldn't specify which products. The company's brands include laundry detergents such as all and Wisk, fabric softeners and dish detergent. Gerry Setley, vice president of the International Chemical Workers Union Council, which represents many of the plant's 350 workers, said the company is shifting its laundry detergent production across North America.
FEATURES
By Nunzio Lupo and Nunzio Lupo,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 19, 1991
Assuming you a) never bought the idea that pale is in, and b) know all about the sun's harmful effects on your skin, you have only one choice if you still want that George Hamilton glow.Don't bake it; fake it.Cosmetic and chemical companies say counterfeit tanning has come a long way from the Beach Blanket Bingo days in 1960, when the granddoggie of all faux tan products debuted: QT Quick Tanning Lotion."Early versions of the product did tend to be streaky," says Doug Petkus, a spokesman for the manufacturer, "and I think orange might have been the dominant tone."
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
The state has approved bigger tax breaks for industrial properties in Southeast Baltimore, including the site of a new Amazon warehouse. Designed to spur job creation, the benefits took effect Tuesday. The new "focus areas" provide property owners with a 10-year, 80 percent property tax credit on value added by physical improvements. They also boost the credits granted for wages paid to new employees and offer breaks for investments in "personal property," such as machinery. The benefits apply to about 2.4 square miles around Holabird Avenue and about 7.4 square miles in Orangeville, excluding the residential area.
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