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By Mara H. Gottfried and Mara H. Gottfried,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 12, 2000
Philadelphia-based Corporate Office Properties Trust said yesterday that it has signed Sun Microsystems Inc. to a lease for nearly half of a four-story, 80,000-square-foot office building it is constructing in Columbia. Work began late last month on the Gateway Business Park building and is expected to be completed in the fall. Sun, based in Palo Alto, Calif., is a provider of hardware, software and services that power the Internet. Sun has a Columbia office at 6716 Alexander Bell Drive, which is also owned by COPT.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Stock in Columbia-based Micros Systems Inc. surged Tuesday after a report that it was about to be acquired by technology giant Oracle Corp. The company's shares shot up nearly 15 percent to close at $66.33 each in Tuesday trading after Bloomberg News reported that Oracle and Micros were in exclusive talks about the sale of the Maryland firm for more than $5 billion. The Bloomberg report cited anonymous sources "familiar with the matter," and neither company responded to requests for comment.
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BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 1997
Microsoft Corp. has taken its boldest step yet toward co-opting Java, a programming language that was supposed to eliminate distinctions among computers but that Microsoft wants reconstitute in a unique Windows flavor.The announcement last week of J/Direct could eventually torpedo the efforts of companies that hope to use Java's promise of an easy, unifying programming language to weaken the software giant.If Java programs are written under the J/Direct guidelines, they will work more closely with Windows, but will not work in any other environment, such as Unix.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | November 2, 2006
SAN FRANCISCO -- Sun Microsystems Inc. founder Scott G. McNealy took on a new role when he quit as chief executive officer in April: corporate pitchman. His new job may be paying off. Sun, the third-largest U.S. seller of servers that run Web sites and corporate networks, last week reported a 17 percent increase in first-quarter sales. McNealy, who stepped down after five years of losses, said he has traveled 75,000 miles, visiting a customer a day, since passing the top job to protege Jonathan I. Schwartz.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,Staff Writer | January 17, 1994
Coalition to try to make PC conferencing easierAn industry coalition formed last week will work on standards to allow personal computer users to work in real time with colleagues down the hall or across the country.The group, led by Intel Corp., is combining computer and communications expertise to make possible video conferencing and collaboration on documents, using a variety of PCs, data networking methods and software applications.The first commercial products, Intel says, could appear before the end of the year.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2001
A flurry of bad news yesterday sent stocks tumbling for the fourth consecutive day, including a report that consumers - the muscle behind the economy - are spending less. The Dow Jones industrial average, a bellwether index made up of 30 leading companies, fell 171.32 points, or 1.70 percent, to 9,919.58. It was the first time that the Dow, which is down 8 percent for the year, closed below 10,000 since April 9. The Nasdaq composite index, which tracks many large computer companies, slid 51.49 points, or 2.79 percent, to 1,791.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Stock in Columbia-based Micros Systems Inc. surged Tuesday after a report that it was about to be acquired by technology giant Oracle Corp. The company's shares shot up nearly 15 percent to close at $66.33 each in Tuesday trading after Bloomberg News reported that Oracle and Micros were in exclusive talks about the sale of the Maryland firm for more than $5 billion. The Bloomberg report cited anonymous sources "familiar with the matter," and neither company responded to requests for comment.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Pelline and Jeff Pelline,San Francisco Chronicle | August 14, 1995
Netscape is old news. The next Silicon Valley start-up you may hear about is Granite Systems, run by Sun Microsystems co-founder Andy Bechtolsheim.Mr. Bechtolsheim, 39, resigned from computer workstation giant Sun last week to form the start-up with $2 million of his own money. Granite Systems will focus on computer networking -- the plumbing system that links computers."I've been at Sun for 13 years, and I just wanted to try something different," Mr. Bechtolsheim said. He is teaming up with David Cheriton, a Stanford University professor of computer science, to launch Granite Systems.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 21, 1991
NEW YORK -- IBM said yesterday that its planned fall announcement of its under-$10,000 RISC workstation would be pushed back to early 1992 because of a design flaw.The flaw limits the performance of a specialized chip that controls the movement of data between the computer's microprocessor and its peripherals, such as disk drives, International Business Machines Corp. said.The delay will strengthen Sun Microsystem's hand in the highly competitive market, analysts said.Sun Microsystems retains a commanding lead in the market for the machines, which are used by scientists and engineers.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | May 10, 1993
At age 27, Scott McNealy founded Sun Microsystems. Eleven years later, it's a $4 billion company, an industry leader and a standard-setter.In a recent interview with Upside, the Silicon Valley insiders' magazine, McNealy explained Sun's success.First, the company has a core concept, a clear idea of the market it wants to serve and the technology it wants to apply.Second, it has established superb vendor partnerships.Third, Sun has nurtured a strong and loyal user base (to the extent there's any loyalty in the computer industry)
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 5, 2005
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- Google Inc., the world's most-used Internet search engine, and Sun Microsystems Inc. joined forces to offer online word processing and spreadsheet functions in a direct challenge to Microsoft Corp.'s Office products. Google will distribute Sun's OpenOffice software for personal computers, the companies said at a news conference yesterday in Google's hometown. Some downloaded Sun programs will include Google's toolbar. The alliance may present one of the strongest competitors to Microsoft's dominance in word processing and spreadsheets, which generated $11 billion in sales last fiscal year.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2003
A federal appeals court ruled yesterday that Microsoft Corp. does not have to package Sun Microsystems Inc.'s Java computer programming language with its Windows operating system while awaiting resolution of an antitrust case. The decision reverses a preliminary injunction issued in December by Chief U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz in Baltimore, where Sun's private antitrust case against Microsoft is pending. In a unanimous 28-page opinion, a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit of Appeals in Richmond, Va., said that Motz's preliminary injunction forcing Microsoft to package Java, which is designed to run on a variety of operating systems, with Windows was extreme.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
Although a far cry from the heady months after it went public with its wireless data technology three years ago, Aether Systems Inc. enjoyed a rare day of upbeat news yesterday. Its stock rose nearly 9 percent, its quarterly and annual earnings exceeded analysts' expectations and it announced its second strategic partnership with a major computer company in a month. Aether develops technology that trucking companies, law enforcement and the military, among others, use to communicate via mobile devices.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
A federal judge in Baltimore ordered Microsoft Corp. yesterday to package with its Windows operating system a computer programming language made by Sun Microsystems Inc. The ruling stems from Sun's allegations that Microsoft "committed anticompetitive acts" to thwart the distribution of Java, a computer language made by Sun that also runs applications on top of an existing operating system. Sun also alleged that Microsoft is taking advantage of past antitrust violations to gain a monopoly in a chunk of the personal computer market.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 19, 2002
SANTA CLARA - Sun Microsystems Inc., whose servers run corporate networks and Web sites, introduced a low-end machine to compete against the falling prices of machines based on chips and software made by Intel Corp. and Microsoft Corp. Sun's V480 server, which holds up to four processors, is a junior version of Sun's V880, a lower-cost system carrying up to eight processors that has sold well to cost-conscious businesses, spokeswoman Debbie Walery said. Shipping of the new machine begins today.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2001
A flurry of bad news yesterday sent stocks tumbling for the fourth consecutive day, including a report that consumers - the muscle behind the economy - are spending less. The Dow Jones industrial average, a bellwether index made up of 30 leading companies, fell 171.32 points, or 1.70 percent, to 9,919.58. It was the first time that the Dow, which is down 8 percent for the year, closed below 10,000 since April 9. The Nasdaq composite index, which tracks many large computer companies, slid 51.49 points, or 2.79 percent, to 1,791.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 1, 1999
NEW YORK -- Sun Microsystems Inc., the fourth-largest seller of servers for the Internet, expects to increase sales by providing office-applications software for desktop users, said Chief Executive Officer Scott McNealy.Yesterday, Sun introduced StarOffice -- free application software for word processing, spreadsheets and graphics that's compatible with Microsoft Corp.'s Office software, which sells for as much as $800. Microsoft is the world's biggest software company."We're taking an old page out of the book and kind of doing a new chapter," McNealy said.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
Although a far cry from the heady months after it went public with its wireless data technology three years ago, Aether Systems Inc. enjoyed a rare day of upbeat news yesterday. Its stock rose nearly 9 percent, its quarterly and annual earnings exceeded analysts' expectations and it announced its second strategic partnership with a major computer company in a month. Aether develops technology that trucking companies, law enforcement and the military, among others, use to communicate via mobile devices.
BUSINESS
By Mara H. Gottfried and Mara H. Gottfried,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 12, 2000
Philadelphia-based Corporate Office Properties Trust said yesterday that it has signed Sun Microsystems Inc. to a lease for nearly half of a four-story, 80,000-square-foot office building it is constructing in Columbia. Work began late last month on the Gateway Business Park building and is expected to be completed in the fall. Sun, based in Palo Alto, Calif., is a provider of hardware, software and services that power the Internet. Sun has a Columbia office at 6716 Alexander Bell Drive, which is also owned by COPT.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 1, 1999
NEW YORK -- Sun Microsystems Inc., the fourth-largest seller of servers for the Internet, expects to increase sales by providing office-applications software for desktop users, said Chief Executive Officer Scott McNealy.Yesterday, Sun introduced StarOffice -- free application software for word processing, spreadsheets and graphics that's compatible with Microsoft Corp.'s Office software, which sells for as much as $800. Microsoft is the world's biggest software company."We're taking an old page out of the book and kind of doing a new chapter," McNealy said.
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