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By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | May 15, 1993
Ah, there's nothing like a spring shower . . . the way the air gets washed fresh and clean, the way the grass perks up, the way the water fills the basement . . .Sometimes a basement water problem is just a little thing -- a few trickles down the wall, or water seeping in a crack. Some exterior grading (to make sure water runs away from the house), some crack-filling, may be all it takes to fix it.But in some cases, water is getting in because rain raises the level of the water table above the level of the basement floor.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Jill Sorensen's basement flooded after a winter storm knocked out her power, then again in 2011 during Hurricane Irene. What stopped another encore performance during last year's derecho? She'd installed a sump pump that uses her home's water pressure to kick in when the power conks out. Knock on wood, she hasn't had a flood since. That purchase — about $800 — is one of several moves she's made to prepare her home for bad weather. "We've taken the inevitability of storms more seriously," said Sorensen, who lives in North Baltimore.
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BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | March 24, 2002
A letter from Edwin Leimkuhler of Baltimore described an offer from a waterproofing contractor to install a black, slitted, corrugated plastic tubing around the perimeter of his basement. He was told, however, there was a danger of it becoming clogged with an accumulation of dust and dirt. Another company proposed using rigid plastic pipe with holes in the underside of the pipe. He wants to know whether there is any important difference. What Edwin is describing is the essential component of a typical basement waterproofing system - a drain tile or "French drain."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | September 20, 2009
The problem:: Smelly runoff from a nearby gas station floods a Towson home. The back story:: When it rains in Towson, it floods at Jerry Cornett's house. Cornett lives on Yakona Road, downhill from Porter's Loch Raven Hess gas station on East Joppa Road. His basement has flooded several times when the pump that catches runoff from the gas station gets overloaded. Each time, the Hess Corp. paid for the damage to Cornett's house, he said. But about three weeks ago, the company told him that it would not pay for recent flooding, blaming the problem on an inactive sump pump in his neighbor's vacant home.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Jill Sorensen's basement flooded after a winter storm knocked out her power, then again in 2011 during Hurricane Irene. What stopped another encore performance during last year's derecho? She'd installed a sump pump that uses her home's water pressure to kick in when the power conks out. Knock on wood, she hasn't had a flood since. That purchase — about $800 — is one of several moves she's made to prepare her home for bad weather. "We've taken the inevitability of storms more seriously," said Sorensen, who lives in North Baltimore.
NEWS
July 8, 1996
Columbia fire causes $60,000 damage to homeA basement fire possibly started by an overheated sump pump motor caused $60,000 in damage Thursday to a two-story Columbia home, Howard County fire officials said.No one was injured in the fire in the 9300 block of Gentle Folk in Columbia's Owen Brown village. The four-member Duffy family was moved to another residence, said Lt. Chris Cangemi, a spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue.The state fire marshal's office was still investigating the incident Friday.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | September 14, 1991
The reader who wrote to ask us about a water problem in her basement came to the right place. For several months after Karol moved into her current house, she thought the only hope for the basement was to install a diving board at the top of the stairs.Where was the water coming from? Why was there so much of it? Was fixing it going to cost a fortune? There are few household problems as frustrating as water in the basement."Not always, but on several occasions, water has seeped in the back part of my basement," the reader says.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2005
A reader is concerned about underground springs that threaten to cause water seeping into her home. She purchased her home in 2001 from the first owner who bought it from the builder two years earlier. During 2001 and 2002, the reader spent $2,900 to correct subpar grading by making sure that surface water drained away from the house. Water problems continued in 2003. After Tropical Storm Isabel, the sump pump ran more frequently. A county water supervisor "told me that several areas where I live have underground springs and they can pop up when the groundwater level gets high," says the reader.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | June 21, 2003
Finally, summer is here. Today, at 3:10 p.m., the sun reaches its solstice its farthest position north for the year and starts heading south again. So whats hot for this summer? Hey, forget hot. In Baltimore, the key word is wet! Out: goldens tans from long days at the shore. In: pruney fingers from long days bailing out the basement. Heres a quick guide to whats hot and not for this endless (rainy) summer: Out Sunblock Huaraches Os games at the Yard Popping the sunroof Keg on the rooftop MTV Beach House SARS Bug spray Humidity Margaritas In Poncho Galoshes Rainouts Installing new wipers Sump pump in the basement Weather Channel SAD A lot of bug spray Precipitation Prozac
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 6, 1991
WHEN IT comes to being handy, I can barely work a shower curtain, but don't cry for me -- you'll just be wasting your tears.There are those who curse their inability to do odd repair and maintenance jobs around the house, but I have found many advantages to this handicap.First of all, when you're mechanically impaired, no one in your family ever bothers you with requests to fix things, freeing you to lay on the couch for vast stretches of time.My wife, for instance, would never even think of asking me to look at the dishwasher when it breaks down, which it seems to do every other week.
BUSINESS
By Tribune Newspapers | April 5, 2009
Think of your home's foundation as a cracked concrete cup half-sunk in a mud puddle. Water wants to seep in from the surrounding soil, and the only thing that keeps it at bay is a sump pump hidden in a pit in the basement floor. It's easy to forget and neglect that pump, but you don't want it to fail, especially after a soil-soaking heavy rain or a spring thaw. A few simple precautions, taken every few months and whenever a heavy rain is predicted, can detect a problem before a crisis. Check the outlet.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2005
A reader is concerned about underground springs that threaten to cause water seeping into her home. She purchased her home in 2001 from the first owner who bought it from the builder two years earlier. During 2001 and 2002, the reader spent $2,900 to correct subpar grading by making sure that surface water drained away from the house. Water problems continued in 2003. After Tropical Storm Isabel, the sump pump ran more frequently. A county water supervisor "told me that several areas where I live have underground springs and they can pop up when the groundwater level gets high," says the reader.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2004
Dear Mr. Azrael: What are rules in general as to the directing of rain spout or sump pump water to my property from a house next door, even if their ground is slightly higher than mine? Dear Reader: The general rule is that the owner of the higher land has a right to have surface water flow naturally from the high ground over the land of the lower landowner. So, when falling rain and melting snow flow naturally from upper land to lower land, the owner of the lower land has no right to erect embankments that change the natural flow of the surface water.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | June 21, 2003
Finally, summer is here. Today, at 3:10 p.m., the sun reaches its solstice its farthest position north for the year and starts heading south again. So whats hot for this summer? Hey, forget hot. In Baltimore, the key word is wet! Out: goldens tans from long days at the shore. In: pruney fingers from long days bailing out the basement. Heres a quick guide to whats hot and not for this endless (rainy) summer: Out Sunblock Huaraches Os games at the Yard Popping the sunroof Keg on the rooftop MTV Beach House SARS Bug spray Humidity Margaritas In Poncho Galoshes Rainouts Installing new wipers Sump pump in the basement Weather Channel SAD A lot of bug spray Precipitation Prozac
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | March 24, 2002
A letter from Edwin Leimkuhler of Baltimore described an offer from a waterproofing contractor to install a black, slitted, corrugated plastic tubing around the perimeter of his basement. He was told, however, there was a danger of it becoming clogged with an accumulation of dust and dirt. Another company proposed using rigid plastic pipe with holes in the underside of the pipe. He wants to know whether there is any important difference. What Edwin is describing is the essential component of a typical basement waterproofing system - a drain tile or "French drain."
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | September 30, 2001
Ron Landy of Woodbine informed me about an incident where he had water flood over his basement door threshold, and he's worried that it will recur even though the builder made improvements to the drain. He wrote: "I recently moved into a new home with an areaway - a stairwell leading to a below-ground basement. The bottom of the well has a drain that leads directly to the sump pump. ... During a serious storm in early July, we had 5 inches [of water] in one hour, the drain was overwhelmed, and water seeped under the door to the stairwell and damaged the carpet in the finished basement.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | September 30, 2001
Ron Landy of Woodbine informed me about an incident where he had water flood over his basement door threshold, and he's worried that it will recur even though the builder made improvements to the drain. He wrote: "I recently moved into a new home with an areaway - a stairwell leading to a below-ground basement. The bottom of the well has a drain that leads directly to the sump pump. ... During a serious storm in early July, we had 5 inches [of water] in one hour, the drain was overwhelmed, and water seeped under the door to the stairwell and damaged the carpet in the finished basement.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | September 20, 2009
The problem:: Smelly runoff from a nearby gas station floods a Towson home. The back story:: When it rains in Towson, it floods at Jerry Cornett's house. Cornett lives on Yakona Road, downhill from Porter's Loch Raven Hess gas station on East Joppa Road. His basement has flooded several times when the pump that catches runoff from the gas station gets overloaded. Each time, the Hess Corp. paid for the damage to Cornett's house, he said. But about three weeks ago, the company told him that it would not pay for recent flooding, blaming the problem on an inactive sump pump in his neighbor's vacant home.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | October 10, 1999
YOU KNOW you're having a bad day when:You arrive home to find the bomb squad has cordoned off your house.You arrive at your office to find the crew of "60 Minutes" waiting for you.You arrive home to find it's raining in the dining room.The latter, alas, is what happened to Karol in the recent meteorological unpleasantness. She got home about 7: 30 p.m. and discovered that the roof had leaked in the dining room until a piece of plaster fell down, and then water had poured in through the hole.
NEWS
July 8, 1996
Columbia fire causes $60,000 damage to homeA basement fire possibly started by an overheated sump pump motor caused $60,000 in damage Thursday to a two-story Columbia home, Howard County fire officials said.No one was injured in the fire in the 9300 block of Gentle Folk in Columbia's Owen Brown village. The four-member Duffy family was moved to another residence, said Lt. Chris Cangemi, a spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue.The state fire marshal's office was still investigating the incident Friday.
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