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By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | March 27, 1992
If I needed another reason not to buy a Japanese car, it would be the shameful way that some Japanese are treating a fine American lad named Konishiki.Actually, Konishiki is his professional name. Back in Hawaii, where he grew up, he was plain old Salevaa Atisnoe.But it is as Konishiki that he has created a huge uproar and debate in Japan.Konishiki is a sumo wrestler. You've probably seen pictures of these athletes. They are enormously fat guys who wear something like a diaper and try to shove or bump each other off their feet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | July 20, 2011
I had always resisted truTV's primetime lineup. First, there's the network's slogan: “Not Reality. Actuality.” It still confuses me. Secondly, I'd seen promos for several of the shows and was pretty sure that all the highlighted squabbles had the potential to suck out my soul. But I caved. I watched and kept watching. Now I'm addicted. Here's an overview of some of the best of truTv's pugilistic programming. HARDCORE PAWN Watch it: 9 p.m. Tuesdays What it's about: The Gold family owns American Jewelry and Loan off 8 Mile Road.
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NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | March 23, 1992
TOKYO -- No tears of joy this time from Konishiki, the 577-pound sumo wrestler from Hawaii. No promotion to the sport's highest rank, either.Konishiki won his third Emperor's Cup in a crunching victory yesterday, but becoming first foreign grand champion in Japan's most ancient and distinctive national sport was another matter.It's not that the the sumo world is riddled with xenophobia, as the explanation went. Please understand that it was just that, well, the foreign behemoth "did not look good" in two matches he lost during the 15-day Osaka Spring Grand Sumo Tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
It's 10 o'clock on a Tuesday night on Baltimore's North Avenue, one building away from the Maryland Avenue bridge — not your typical party time or place. But there's a bustle on the Joe Squared patio, and it doesn't just come from late diners scarfing down pizza and risotto. An eclectic group of fun-seekers — bar-hoppers and artists and students — are schmoozing and flirting and greeting fellow regulars for the weekly dance party known as "Dig. " Created by DJ and rock-soul-funk musician Landis Expandis, Dig has become a big draw for breakdancers — or, as they call themselves, b-boys and b-girls, or breakers.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | October 28, 1992
TOKYO -- For one afternoon and evening, political scandals and global recession scarcely got mentioned. Japan's TV newscasters had a bigger story: the country's two most sensational teen idols are going to break millions of hearts by marrying.The bride-to-be: Rie Miyazawa, 19, petite idol of the bubble-gum set since her first movie at age 15 and of the skin-book set since last year, when she successfully defied Japan's ban on pubic hair pictures in a million-selling volume called "Santa Fe," after the U.S. city where it was photographed.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | January 25, 1993
TOKYO -- No choice this time. The next Yokozuna -- grand champion of sumo wrestling, the most Japanese of all sports -- will have to be an American despite years of official and semiofficial resistance.Akebono, or Chad Rowan to his friends back home in Hawaii, unceremoniously drove Japan's great nativist hope out of the ring in a matter of seconds yesterday to win his second tournament championship in a row.Two championships in a row is traditionally the one sure way to get the nod from the sober-faced men of the Yokozuna Promotion Council.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1997
TOKYO -- He is to other men what Mount Everest is to a hillock, and for 15 years the 600-pound wrestler known as Konishiki has been one of the most famous and even influential foreigners in Japan, helping to open the ancient sport of sumo to the outside world.Yesterday, after an extraordinary career that began when he first entered the ring in 1982, Konishiki announced his retirement. His withdrawal from sumo competitions is a landmark event in Japan, treated as far more serious by most people than the departure of any ambassador.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 27, 1994
Q. How can you pay millions to a friendly and powerful legislator legally? A. Call yourself a publisher, him an author and it an advance.Baseball owners and players have given up the game in favor of sumo wrassling.
NEWS
March 24, 1992
Congratulations to the Yank in Tokyo, Konishiki, for winning his third major sumo wrestling tournament title. He must be the best. It is a thrill to all who know the Hawaii native by his American name, Salevaa Fuauli Atisanoe.Of course, the selection committee of the Japan Sumo Association refused to promote Konishiki to the top rank in the sport, yokozuna, or grand champion. No foreigner has ever been one. Konishiki is a true yokozuna, and they all know it.The Japan Sumo Association committee first ruled that foreigners are eligible, then pretended to withhold the title on form.
NEWS
May 31, 2005
John D'Amico, 67, a Hockey Hall of Fame linesman who spent 23 years officiating before joining the NHL front office, died Sunday. "John D'Amico brought a passion and dedication to his profession both on the ice as a linesman and later as a supervisor of officials," National Hockey League Executive Vice President Jim Gregory said. "A true testament to John's legacy is the respect that players, general managers, coaches, fellow officials and fans had for him." Mr. D'Amico started as a referee, officiating his first game in 1964.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | September 26, 2006
Joshua Leary ran across the stage and jumped on a springboard, becoming airborne before a fabric fastener-covered wall abruptly ended his brief flight. Carlos Bonilla went next, landing with his arms and legs splayed across the wall. "It was so cool ... like flying in the air," said Carlos, an eighth-grader at Deep Creek Middle School. Other pupils at the Essex school raced carbon dioxide-powered "dragsters" or kicked gargantuan soccer balls, while two teachers squared off in an oversized sumo wrestling match - all in the name of science.
NEWS
May 31, 2005
John D'Amico, 67, a Hockey Hall of Fame linesman who spent 23 years officiating before joining the NHL front office, died Sunday. "John D'Amico brought a passion and dedication to his profession both on the ice as a linesman and later as a supervisor of officials," National Hockey League Executive Vice President Jim Gregory said. "A true testament to John's legacy is the respect that players, general managers, coaches, fellow officials and fans had for him." Mr. D'Amico started as a referee, officiating his first game in 1964.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2000
LIKE MOST high school clubs, Atholton High School's Kamakura Sister School Club raises funds to defray the cost of its activities. That's not unusual. But the club's latest fund-raiser is. The Kamakura Sister School Club -- founded in 1992 and named for its sister city in Japan -- sends its members for a visit there every two years and acts as host to visiting Japanese students in the years in between. This year, it's the Atholton students' turn to travel. To finance their trip in June, the club will present an evening of mock sumo wrestling from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. March 10 at the school.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 8, 1998
The restaurant at the Main Press Center appeared crowded, with a number of Olympic workers gathered near the entrance, chatting excitedly.Was there a wait, two U.S. reporters asked?Two young Japanese women smiled and pointed to a corner table."Musashimaru," they said, almost giggling.There he was, all right, all 440 pounds of him. The Hawaiian-born sumo wrestler was preparing for his afternoon feeding. One by one, the young women approached, taking pictures, getting autographs, giggling.What a life.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 1, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- Well, it's not every Winter Olympics that includes sumo wrestlers and snowboarders.But then, the organizers of the last Winter Olympics of the 20th century are out to prove that just about anything is possible on ice and snow.The Nagano Games, which begin with opening ceremonies televised Friday night to the United States, could be subtitled the Transition Games.There will be new stars and new sports in a 17-day, multibillion-dollar spectacular centered in this city of 360,000 tucked in rugged mountains 125 miles west of Tokyo.
SPORTS
January 29, 1998
Days until opening ceremonies: 9.Snowfall: One-third of an inch in Nagano City, no new snow on men's downhill course. That left 7 inches in Nagano City, and 6 feet, 6 1/2 inches on the downhill course.Update: Hawaiian-born sumo wrestler Akebono will perform a traditional rite of purification at the opening ceremonies. Akebono, a naturalized Japanese citizen, holds sumo's highest rank of grand champion. The other grand champion, Takanohana, had been cast for the part, but bowed out because of illness.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 24, 1992
United Way of America is like the United Nations. If its constituent members don't pay their back dues, they won't have it to fall back on.Tom McMillen proposes to clean up the House of Representatives. If only the voters will let him back to do it.How about Japan's Sumo Association grant that our man Konishiki is the yokozuna (numero uno)? And Major League Baseball welcome the Nintendo Company's generous offer to rescue the Mariners for Seattle?
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 8, 1998
The restaurant at the Main Press Center appeared crowded, with a number of Olympic workers gathered near the entrance, chatting excitedly.Was there a wait, two U.S. reporters asked?Two young Japanese women smiled and pointed to a corner table."Musashimaru," they said, almost giggling.There he was, all right, all 440 pounds of him. The Hawaiian-born sumo wrestler was preparing for his afternoon feeding. One by one, the young women approached, taking pictures, getting autographs, giggling.What a life.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1997
TOKYO -- He is to other men what Mount Everest is to a hillock, and for 15 years the 600-pound wrestler known as Konishiki has been one of the most famous and even influential foreigners in Japan, helping to open the ancient sport of sumo to the outside world.Yesterday, after an extraordinary career that began when he first entered the ring in 1982, Konishiki announced his retirement. His withdrawal from sumo competitions is a landmark event in Japan, treated as far more serious by most people than the departure of any ambassador.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | February 6, 1997
The rise of bagelsI like to think of it as the bageling of Baltimore. I know I've missed a hundred for every one new bagel shop I mention in this column, but here are two new ones. Greetings & Readings, 809 Taylor Ave. in Towson, is opening a bagel shop in its store, using dough from Sam's Bagels but baked fresh at G & R. Also, the Thames St. Deli and Bagel Bakery is now open at 1623 Thames St. in Fells Point.Valentine's DaySure, you can get a table at a classic romantic spot for Valentine's Day. But if you're looking for something a little offbeat, here are two suggestions:The new Russian Tea Room at 37 S. Charles St. is having a gypsy floor show Feb. 14, 15 and 16, with a full band, singing and dancing.
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