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NEWS
By Washington Bureau | April 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The State Department said yesterday that it had "expressed our concern" over the Russian Security Ministry's summons of a Baltimore Sun Moscow correspondent for questioning about articles he has written.Will Englund was ordered to appear today for questioning by the security ministry that is the successor to the KGB. He was not told what he would be asked about. But the summons apparently is related to articles Mr. Englund has written about the development of chemical weapons in Russia and the former Soviet Union.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Looks like the Orioles will make another move today. The agent for catcher Steve Clevenger tweeted this morning that his client was headed back to Baltimore to join the Orioles. Clevenger has been raking at Triple-A, hitting .328 in 36 games, so in one sense this isn't a surprise. However, Clevenger played in one of the Tides' games in Friday's doubleheader and Norfolk has a doubleheader again today. So losing a catcher can't be ideal for the Tides. Plus, the Orioles only have two more games remaining before the All-Star break.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Peter Hermann and Joe Mathews and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1998
Theresa E. Ambrose was killed in February, shot during a robbery at the Pigtown bar where she worked. But until last week, the court was trying to resurrect her to testify at the trial of the teen-ager accused of murdering her.Three times the Baltimore Circuit Court sent summonses to Ambrose, who was 35, demanding that she testify against the 16-year-old girl charged with pulling the trigger. The order was clear: either appear in court or be jailed for contempt."Do the courts think they can subpoena her ghost?"
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
FLORENCE, S.C. - It had been less than a day since Carol Grause ended a multi-state hunt for a man accused of a Baltimore County slaying and his 11-year-old daughter, but she was reluctant to take any credit. The trim, 53-year-old woman, who wore a silver cross embellished with small diamonds around her neck, said she believes God orchestrated Caitlyn Virts' rescue. "I am not the hero; the hero is those who started prayers for that girl," Grause said early Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2000
The county fire lieutenant released without a bail hearing on a criminal charge through intervention by the police chief returned to work yesterday - only to be served with a summons, given drug and alcohol tests and put on leave with pay pending their outcome, authorities said. The lieutenant, Patrick Gilligan, 35, was informed in the District Court summons of the charge against him, fourth-degree burglary, and that a date for his appearance would be set. Chief P. Thomas Shanahan has said that he felt immediate treatment was needed for Gilligan, who within a month had also been charged twice with drunken driving and never brought before a commissioner.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Erin Cox and By Luke Broadwater and Erin Cox | February 23, 2014
Maryland State Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr. this week denied claims from veteran political consultant Julius Henson that Miller was influencing a violation of probation case against Henson.  "It's not true," Miller said after learning of Henson's statements to reporters at a news conference. "I don't know Julius Henson. I don't think he and I have ever talked. Absolutely not. We've never talked. I wouldn't know a thing about his district, or him. I don't know who is probation agent is -- I don't even know who his judge is. I'm not involved in the case at all. " Henson, an East Baltimore Democrat, on Thursday formally filed to run for a Maryland Senate seat even though the state says that may violate the terms of his probation. Henson, 64, has vowed to “retire” longtime Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden, whom he plans to challenge in the June 24 Democratic primary.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | August 14, 1992
Sheriff Robert G. Pepersack Sr. announced this week that his office generated an all-time high of more than $380,000 in revenue for the county during the past fiscal year -- more than double the previous high of $128,000 in 1990, according to the sheriff.But county officials said yesterday that Sheriff Pepersack's claim is wishful thinking at best.The dispute is the latest salvo in the battle between Sheriff Pepersack and the county government over control of the sheriff's budget. Sheriff Pepersack filed suit in Circuit Court last month accusing the county executive and County Council of interfering with his office's operation by cutting the position of undersheriff.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Rona Hirsch and Lan Nguyen and Rona Hirsch,Staff Writers | July 14, 1992
A former girlfriend of Washington Bullets basketball player David Wingate has charged him with assault, saying he punched her several times when she went to his home in April.Mr. Wingate, 28, had called Tyra Holland, of Columbia, to his house at the 5700 block of April Journey Way in Columbia to discuss their children, according to a Howard County District Court summons.The assault complaint by Ms. Holland, of the 9400 block of Farewell Road, alleges that Mr. Wingate bruised her back and arm after a domestic argument in which he asked her to swear on a Bible that she would not bother him anymore.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | June 22, 1991
Ocean City police have cited the owner and manager of an apartment complex for failing to control noise by youthful residents celebrating Seniors Week.The citations are the first of their kind under a stepped-up police effort to control noise by Junebugs, new high school graduates who descend on the resort city each June for sun, ocean and fun.Residents have long complained that many of the young revelers who take part in the three-week rite called Seniors Week are rowdy and noisy and consume alcohol illegally.
BUSINESS
By Patrick Rossello | December 10, 1990
IF YOUR DISPUTE with another company appears to be headed for court, you need to know some basics about the judicial system. Perhaps you can handle the matter yourself in small claims court. If the case is more serious, you'll need to hire a lawyer. Either way, it helps to know what to expect once you enter the legal process.Small claims: A dispute over an amount under $2,500 can be heard in in small claims. The structure of that court allows for a relaxation of the rules of evidence. This means you don't need to be a Perry Mason to represent yourself.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Erin Cox and By Luke Broadwater and Erin Cox | February 23, 2014
Maryland State Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr. this week denied claims from veteran political consultant Julius Henson that Miller was influencing a violation of probation case against Henson.  "It's not true," Miller said after learning of Henson's statements to reporters at a news conference. "I don't know Julius Henson. I don't think he and I have ever talked. Absolutely not. We've never talked. I wouldn't know a thing about his district, or him. I don't know who is probation agent is -- I don't even know who his judge is. I'm not involved in the case at all. " Henson, an East Baltimore Democrat, on Thursday formally filed to run for a Maryland Senate seat even though the state says that may violate the terms of his probation. Henson, 64, has vowed to “retire” longtime Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden, whom he plans to challenge in the June 24 Democratic primary.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 3, 2013
The Harford County Department of Emergency Services recently presented Jack Marshall Dempsey, 10, with a Gold 911 award in recognition of his prompt but ill-fated efforts to save the life of his grandfather. On the morning of April 1, Jack found his grandfather, Alfred "Ted" Marshall slumped in a chair. The boy immediately called 911 to report his grandfather's condition in an attempt to save his life. Unfortunately, Mr. Marshall had sustained a massive heart attack and later died at the hospital.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
BOSTON - Outfielder Chris Dickerson, who was abruptly removed in the first inning of Tuesday's game at Triple-A Norfolk, will join the Orioles Wednesday in Boston. A corresponding 25-man roster move to add Dickerson is uncertain. Orioles manager Buck Showalter said Monday he was optimistic outfielder Nolan Reimold, who left Sunday's game with a right hamstring injury, could avoid a disabled list stint with Tuesday's off day and a right-hander pitcher slated to pitch for Boston on Wednesday - which would give the right-handed hitting Reimold two extra days off. Since Dickerson is under a minor league contract, the Orioles would need to add him to the 40-man roster.
NEWS
October 17, 2012
Regarding your article on school safety, I believe the cellphone app you describe will be a great success ("Anne Arundel police develop app for reaching officers in schools," Oct. 15). I am a graduate of Perry Hall High School, where there was a recent shooting. Most kids are afraid to go to the police or school officials because they don't want to be picked on or talked about by other students. We never know what people are thinking, nor can we control their actions, but this is a perfect example of how this kind of app could have been used.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
Anyone who has been around Orioles manager Buck Showalter's pregame news conferences has noticed how often he asked about Dylan Bundy's minor league outings during the course of the season. Some of it is Showalter's deadpan shtick, but you could defeinitely tell that the Orioles skipper was itching to kick the tires on the organization's top pitching prospect this season. The Orioles' sudden summoning of Bundy today to add bullpen depth shouldn't be too surprising. A few weeks back, Showalter announced that the 19-year-old phenom would not be a late-season call up, but instead participate in the organization's instructional league in Sarasota, Fla. But until then, all signs pointed to Bundy joining the big club in September.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Members of Baltimore's historic preservation commission have been summoned to a closed-door meeting Monday at which, some preservationists say, the board members will be asked to oust the commission's director. Board members and preservationists say efforts are under way to remove Kathleen Kotarba, who has served for decades as the executive director of the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation. "We heard from multiple folks that the closed session was going to be to take a vote to fire Kathleen Kotarba," said Eli Pousson, field officer for Baltimore Heritage, a nonprofit group that closely monitors the commission.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
There was a time when city residents only had to do jury duty every 18 months if they reported for duty and weren't selected for a trial. If they served on a jury they weren't called for another three years. Now residents are called for duty every year. My co-worker received a summons for late summer after having served last fall. When she called the courthouse she was informed there was a "new system" that did not include the dates of residents' previous service, so that many people were being called back within a year.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 18, 2007
The letter came with a return address of the Baltimore District Court in the window. Not a good sign. Fortunately, the letter was addressed to "H., Wally," at my house in Northwest Baltimore. My wife handed me the letter and lamented that she hates getting summons sent to our address. "I ain't Wally, so I ain't worried," I answered. But old Wally H. (we're omitting the last name for the sake of Wally's privacy) got four other pieces of mail sent to my house the same day the summons came.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
There was a time when city residents only had to do jury duty every 18 months if they reported for duty and weren't selected for a trial. If they served on a jury they weren't called for another three years. Now residents are called for duty every year. My co-worker received a summons for late summer after having served last fall. When she called the courthouse she was informed there was a "new system" that did not include the dates of residents' previous service, so that many people were being called back within a year.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
Johns Hopkins University student Nathan Krasnopoler was riding his bike home from the Waverly Farmer's Market on a sunny Saturday morning last February when his life was cut short by an elderly driver. The 20-year-old computer science major from Ellicott City was riding in a marked bike lane on University Parkway when an 83-year-old woman turned right and hit him, trapping him under her car for 15 to 20 minutes. He never regained consciousness, was in a coma for more than five months and died Aug. 10 of brain injuries sustained in the accident.
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