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NEWS
August 7, 2013
Given the rocky U.S.-Russia relationship that continues to sour despite President Barack Obama's earnest efforts to, as former secretary of state Hillary Clinton once put it, hit the "reset button" in dealings with the Kremlin, today's announcement that a planned summit meeting between Mr. Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin has been postponed indefinitely was not a surprise. Mr. Obama had every reason to heed calls from lawmakers urging him to cancel the engagement; there was little point to meeting with Russia's leader just for the sake of a meeting that would only puff up Mr. Putin's prestige at the president's expense.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The nation's transportation system is broken, agreed a panel of transportation wonks gathered in downtown Baltimore on Thursday, but they could not agree on how to fix it. "Transportation is broken. There's no way to fund it. America is one big pothole," said Ray LaHood, a former U.S. transportation secretary. "It will be up to the American people to say enough is enough. " Opinions for fixing it at the Greater Baltimore Committee's seventh annual transportation summit ranged from increasing federal investment in local infrastructure projects that would help address broader issues to cutting all federal investment in such projects to focus on national highway needs instead.
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NEWS
January 16, 1995
MOSCOW - President Boris Yeltsin has invited President Clinton to a summit here in May, despite increasing U.S. criticsm of the campaign in Chechnya, the ITAR-Tass news agency said today.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
A Harford County judge who helped lead this week's Maryland Judiciary summit on care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth in the state's foster care system said the event was a success and could lead to substantive improvements in the future. "It went very well. We had excellent speakers," said Judge William O. Carr, a Harford County Circuit Court administrative judge and chair of the outreach and programming subcommittee of the state Foster Care Court Improvement Project.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
R&B singer and Baltimore native Mario will appear at Mondawmin Mall Wednesday at a teen summit. The event is open to young people citywide and attendees will have a chance to ask the star questions. Other "celebrities" appearing on the panel include: Ray Lucas, president of 100 Black Men Baltimore chapter Sonja, a former 92 Q disc jockey Keion Carpenter - a former NFL Atlanta Falcon who's from Baltimore              Tori Nelson - middleweight women's boxing champion  The release also lists mall General Manager Romaine Smallwood-Smoot as one of the attractions.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2011
Baltimore City State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein hosted a summit Tuesday about witness intimidation where police, prosecutors and witness assistance providers could discuss the best ways to protect and support victims and witnesses of crime. "Violent retaliation against victims, witnesses, and informants threatens the very fabric of our criminal justice system and our communities," said Rep. Elijah E. Cummings in a statement before the summit. Cummings was the event's keynote speaker.
NEWS
May 14, 1991
President Bush should spurn pressures within his administration for a superpower summit unless a strategic arms reduction treaty is ready for signing. His motto should be: "No Treaty, No Summit."Richard Burt, who was Mr. Bush's chief arms control negotiator until last February, has warned that unless the United States and the Soviet Union complete a START treaty soon, "the opportunity for nuclear arms control may be lost for years to come." Why so? Because hardliners in the Soviet Union, taking advantage of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's weakness, are increasing their pressure to scuttle START.
NEWS
January 13, 1995
Never have an American president and Japanese prime minister met on such weak terms. So yesterday President Clinton chose to see the trade relationship jar as half-full rather than half-empty and Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama promised that Japan would play its financial part in Washington's provision of non-weapons-grade nuclear reactors to North Korea. Mr. Clinton got a show of support for his North Korea policy while Mr. Murayama was seen to be a world leader.Last February, when Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa came to call on President Clinton, they argued over trade, agreed to disagree and had a "failed" summit that was a modest political success since they were seen to be tough with one another.
NEWS
November 13, 2005
President Bush's failure to persuade Latin American and Caribbean leaders to approve a U.S.-backed free trade agreement during the recent Summit of the Americas is an indication of waning U.S. influence in Latin America after years of diplomatic neglect by his administration, and a reminder of why it is important to nurture ties in that region. The outcome of the two-day summit in Argentina, attended by 34 Western Hemisphere countries, was further signal of a growing willingness among those nations to assert political independence from the U.S. and express unease with U.S. assurances that the agreement will benefit the region.
NEWS
July 9, 2008
World leaders gathered in Hokkaido, Japan, on Monday prompted raised eyebrows by indulging in a lavish eight-course, 18-dish meal at a Group of Eight summit where one of the main issues was expected to be hunger and the global food crisis. (African leaders who had taken part in talks during the day were not invited to the function.) Hours earlier, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown had urged the world to reduce the "unnecessary demand" for food and called on British families to cut back on their wasteful use of food.
NEWS
By Ray McGovern | July 15, 2014
Absent from U.S. media encomia for recently deceased former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze is any mention of the historic deal he reached with his U.S. counterpart James Baker in 1990 ensuring that the Soviet empire would collapse "with a whimper, not a bang" (Mr. Baker's words). Mr. Baker keeps repeating that the Cold War "could not have ended peacefully without Shevardnadze. " But he and others are silent on the quid pro quo . The quid was Moscow's agreement to swallow the bitter pill of a reunited Germany in NATO; the quo was a U.S. promise not to "leapfrog" NATO over Germany farther East.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
At the end of 2012, there were 29,477 people in Maryland diagnosed and living with HIV or AIDS. Of those, 1,424 -- or just shy of 5 percent -- were between the ages of 13 and 24, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. In an effort to raise awareness of those statistics, the department's Prevention and Health Promotion Administration has teamed up with other advocacy organizations to host a "Youth Sexual Health - HIV Prevention Summit" next week.
EXPLORE
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 28, 2014
The written questions from the audience of more than 100 people came fast and furious on cards read aloud by City Councilman Bill Henry, moderator of the 3rd annual Public Safety Summit at Morgan State University on Saturday. What can city police do about underage drinking, motorists not stopping for pedestrians at crosswalks, and juveniles who are arrested for breaking into homes and then end up back out on the street, doing it again? Why is Roland Park less crime-prone than Cherry Hill?
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 25, 2014
As a crime summit approaches and a survey finds public mistrust of police, the beat goes on for one Northern District officer who patrols the crime-prone Pen Lucy area. "It's the passion that I have," said Officer Edwin Albino, 37, of Edgewood, a nearly eight-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department and a Puerto Rico state police officer before that. "As soon as I wake up in the morning and put my uniform on, there is a sense of pride. I will work in any (police) district, because I'm representing Baltimore City police.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Health officials are investigating a possible outbreak of food poisoning during a conference on food safety at the Baltimore Convention Center. Four people who attended the Food Safety Summit, held April 7-10, reported becoming sick, according to city and state health officials. They called Baltimore's 311 line on April 15 and 16 to report feeling sick with diarrhea and an upset stomach about 12 hours after they had eaten a meal at the convention center on April 9. There have been no hospitalizations or deaths, and no one who attended other events at the convention center has reported falling ill, health officials said.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Joseph Decatur Barksdale, who went from the cotton fields of Mississippi where his family was sharecropping to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, where he oversaw the information technology department, died March 15 at his home in Laurel from complications from a fall. He was 79. "He loved poetry and he loved Shakespeare," said his daughter Maryn Rosenberg of Laurel. But he also loved to tell stories of growing up in the South, "chasing butterflies, learning to write his letters with a stick in the dirt, listening to his grandfather play the fiddle, or running barefoot in the cotton fields," she said.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
The Johns Hopkins School of Education Neuro-Education Initiative will host its second annual summit and roundtable discussion on the practical applications of brain research on Wednesday at the American Visionary Art Museum. This year's topic, "Attention and Engagement in Learning," will explore current research on attention and student engagement. For more information or to register, go to http://www.education.jhu.edu/nei. liz.bowie@baltsun.com
NEWS
February 24, 2010
Republican Senator Mitch McConnell deigns to attend President Obama's bipartisan health care meeting ("New Obama health plan could block rate hikes," Feb. 20) while claiming Democrats are "arrogant in their refusal to throw out current legislation and start from scratch." In other words Republicans would agree to participate "in good faith" by writing their own version to replace the one already approved by the legislature. What a travesty! This nation has endured eight years under a Republican administration when obviously necessary reforms were simply non-existent, except for the much-vaunted Medicare prescription drug plan which seniors have found contains a fatal flaw known as the "doughnut hole," which negates much of its so-called benefits.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Leaders of Maryland's transportation industry said Monday that the state's future depends on continued infrastructure investment, beyond the $4.4 billion already scheduled for highway and mass transit systems in the next six years. Such investment will be the deciding factor between "a future of mobility and one of stagnation" in an already congested but still-growing region, Donald Fry, president and CEO of the Greater Baltimore Committee, said at the group's annual transportation summit.
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