Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSummerfest
IN THE NEWS

Summerfest

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
July 5, 1992
Four of the BSO's six Summerfest concerts feature pianist Nelson Freire. All concerts, which will be conducted by David Zinman, take place at 7:30 p.m. in Meyerhoff Hall. After each concert there will be food available in the festival's outdoor plaza and live bands to provide music for those who wish to dance.July 9: Brahms' Symphony No. 4 and Piano Concerto No. 1.July 11: Brahms' Symphony No. 3 and Piano Concerto No. 2.July 14: Rachmaninov's Symphony No. 3 and Piano Concerto No. 3.July 16: Copland's "Danzon Cubano" and "Billy the Kid" and Rachmaninov's Concerto No. 2.July 23: Copland's "El Salon Mexico" and "Rodeo" and Rachmaninov's "Symphonic Dances."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | July 6, 2008
It's easy for a new band to get a little buzz going. Building that buzz into a career in music is the hard part. Since coming together in 2002, Baltimore-based rock band Fools and Horses has become a fixture in the region's music scene. And they've had some success on the national stage, too. Last year, their song "The Therapy" was voted onto a forthcoming artist compilation CD distributed by Starbucks called Off the Clock. Another song was featured on an episode of MTV's reality show Real World.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 3, 1991
The most important guest soloists in the six-year history of Summerfest will participate in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's six-concert series in Meyerhoff Hall this July.The orchestra announced yesterday that soloists in the festival, which takes place between July 11 and July 27, will include violinist Joshua Bell, whom many critics consider today's finest young American violinist and who will play Beethoven's Violin Concerto; the somewhat controversial Soviet emigre pianist Vladimir Feltsman, who will play Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto; and the great Brazilian pianist Nelson Freire, who will play Beethoven's "Emperor Concerto."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 25, 2007
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's annual SummerFest will emphasize lighter classics and popular music this year. The festival opens with a showing of the screen classic The Wizard of Oz. The BSO, led by Constantine Kitsopoulos, will perform the soundtrack in these concerts June 21 and 22 at the Music Center at Strathmore and June 23 at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. A cirque theme will find a troupe of acrobats, aerialists and more sharing the stage when Andrew Constantine conducts such works as Khachaturian's Sabre Dance and Dvorak's Carnival on July 12 at Strathmore and July 13 at Meyerhoff.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 31, 1995
Saturday's final all-Mozart concert in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's Summerfest series presented a program with an extraordinarily high reading on the masterpiece-density scale: the Serenade No. 13 ("Eine Kleine Nachtmusik"), the Piano Concerto No. 12, the Horn Concerto No. 1, the Symphony No. 39 and, in a pre-concert chamber-music performance, the Quintet for Piano and Winds.This kind of program can make listeners glassy-eyed. But this concert, in which Tamas Vasary served not only as a conductor but also as piano soloist, left one deeply satisfied.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | July 10, 1992
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's annual Summerfest got off to a wonderful start last night in Meyerhoff Hall with an all-Brahms program. The centerpiece around which this summer's festival is built is the Brazilian pianist Nelson Freire and he made This is a piece that begins huge, with its first theme over the thunder of kettledrums resounding into infinity, and gets even bigger. Most pianists have traditionally elected to play this piece ferociously. Freire chose another route. Keeping in mind that the piece was written under the influence of Schumann, the Brazilian played the piece in a manner that was primarily poetic, reflective and tender.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
Nothing is sacred in music, including sacred music or music that seems spiritual. Even Beethoven's inspiring Symphony No. 9 (Choral), opening the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's Summerfest season tonight, was once rapped for its unorthodox choral ending.Was Beethoven's vocal climax set to Schiller's poem "Ode to Joy" a mistake, a bad accident, a revolutionary gimmick or a stroke of genius? One Boston writer earlier in the century called the end "vocal hurry-scurry and shouting . . . assailing ears and nerves . . . (making the chorus)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 25, 2007
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's annual SummerFest will emphasize lighter classics and popular music this year. The festival opens with a showing of the screen classic The Wizard of Oz. The BSO, led by Constantine Kitsopoulos, will perform the soundtrack in these concerts June 21 and 22 at the Music Center at Strathmore and June 23 at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. A cirque theme will find a troupe of acrobats, aerialists and more sharing the stage when Andrew Constantine conducts such works as Khachaturian's Sabre Dance and Dvorak's Carnival on July 12 at Strathmore and July 13 at Meyerhoff.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
Nine-year-old Jonathan Thomas spent part of yesterday making a stomp rocket at the Baltimore Police Athletic League's second Summerfest, a police-sponsored fair that attracted about people to eat, dance, and play in sweltering Gwynns Falls Park.Thomas, who lives in Randallstown, rolled a blue square of paper around an 8-inch wooden dowel, taped it closed, added orange triangles to make wings, then closed off one end. He attached his hand-fashioned rocket to a rubber hose, then connected it to a rubber pump called an air bladder.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | July 25, 1993
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra calls its current "Summerfest" series "Mozart Mania," and aptly named it is.The BSO's programs, which -- except for one concert -- consist entirely of the Salzburg composer's music, have indeed produced something like mania at the box office: Every concert so far has sold out. Compare this to last summer's dismal showing, when the orchestra's concerts of music by Brahms and Rachmaninoff filled less than half of Meyerhoff Hall.Mozart's...
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 1998
Seems like the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra season just ended, doesn't it? How can it be time for Summerfest already?In truth, the BSO Summerfest is early this year because the orchestra needs to be out of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall for a full two months. The hall is in the throes of an acoustic renovation that began last summer and will be finished next year.Summerfest has a slightly different format this year: an early curtain (7: 30 p.m.); five mixed programs of chamber music and orchestral music, each spotlighting a different composer; and dancing afterward on the plaza outside the hall.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
Nine-year-old Jonathan Thomas spent part of yesterday making a stomp rocket at the Baltimore Police Athletic League's second Summerfest, a police-sponsored fair that attracted about people to eat, dance, and play in sweltering Gwynns Falls Park.Thomas, who lives in Randallstown, rolled a blue square of paper around an 8-inch wooden dowel, taped it closed, added orange triangles to make wings, then closed off one end. He attached his hand-fashioned rocket to a rubber hose, then connected it to a rubber pump called an air bladder.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 31, 1995
Saturday's final all-Mozart concert in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's Summerfest series presented a program with an extraordinarily high reading on the masterpiece-density scale: the Serenade No. 13 ("Eine Kleine Nachtmusik"), the Piano Concerto No. 12, the Horn Concerto No. 1, the Symphony No. 39 and, in a pre-concert chamber-music performance, the Quintet for Piano and Winds.This kind of program can make listeners glassy-eyed. But this concert, in which Tamas Vasary served not only as a conductor but also as piano soloist, left one deeply satisfied.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | July 9, 1995
BSO's Summerfest starts with MozartThe Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's popular Summerfest begins July 13 with the first of five programs -- four of them all-Mozart -- in Meyerhoff Hall. The first concert features three of the composer's masterpieces: the Symphony No. 29, the Violin Concerto No. 3 and Mozart's valedictory Piano Concerto No. 27. The conductor and violinist will be the distinguished Jaime Laredo; the pianist will be Joseph Kalichstein. Future concerts take place July 15, July 19, July 27 and July 29. All Summerfest concerts begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $11-$17.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Special to The Sun | July 22, 1994
Last night's inaugural all-Mozart "Summerfest" concert featured Maestro David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at the height of their respective powers, with the composer and the audience the clear beneficiaries.Zinman's view of Mozart is similar in certain respects to many of his contemporaries. He eschews the romanticized approach of the late 19th and early 20th centuries in favor of a lean orchestral sound, fleet tempos and crisp attacks. What sets Zinman apart is that he executes this approach with an enthusiasm and musicality that few today can equal.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | April 29, 1994
Tickets for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's "Summerfest" and Oregon Ridge programs are now on sale.The "Summerfest" programs will be comprised almost entirely of Mozart's works and will feature such stellar soloists as pianists Barry Douglas and Christian Zacharias and violinists Joshua Bell and Pamela Frank. The concerts will be July 14, July 21, July 23, July 28 and July 30. All concerts will be at 7:30 p.m. in Meyerhoff Hall. Subscriptions for all five concerts are $40, $60 and $130.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 1998
Seems like the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra season just ended, doesn't it? How can it be time for Summerfest already?In truth, the BSO Summerfest is early this year because the orchestra needs to be out of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall for a full two months. The hall is in the throes of an acoustic renovation that began last summer and will be finished next year.Summerfest has a slightly different format this year: an early curtain (7: 30 p.m.); five mixed programs of chamber music and orchestral music, each spotlighting a different composer; and dancing afterward on the plaza outside the hall.
FEATURES
July 8, 1991
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will start its Summerfest '91 season with an after-work dance lesson Tuesday in the lobby of the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.Instructors from the Arthur Murray Dance Studio will be on hand to lead group dance lessons while member of the Peabody Ragtime Ensemble provide the music. Free to the public, the party starts at 5:15 p.m. and lasts about an hour.Those attending may win door prizes such as Summerfest T-shirts, tickets and Beethoven beach towels. Cool refreshments will be provided and BSO Music Director David Zinman will stop by.Summerfest '91 kicks off with an all-Beethoven concert Thursday.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | July 25, 1993
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra calls its current "Summerfest" series "Mozart Mania," and aptly named it is.The BSO's programs, which -- except for one concert -- consist entirely of the Salzburg composer's music, have indeed produced something like mania at the box office: Every concert so far has sold out. Compare this to last summer's dismal showing, when the orchestra's concerts of music by Brahms and Rachmaninoff filled less than half of Meyerhoff Hall.Mozart's...
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 11, 1992
Baltimore Symphony's music director, David Zinman, has just been appointed artistic director of the Minnesota Orchestra's Viennese Sommerfest in Minneapolis, one of North America's most important summer music festivals.The 13-year-old festival, which runs annually from mid-July to mid-August, was the model for the much smaller BSO Summerfest, which Mr. Zinman created in Baltimore in 1987.His appointment, which was announced yesterday, means the BSO music director will conduct one of the Minneapolis summer festival's four weeks of concerts in 1993 as artistic director designate and two or more weeks of concerts in 1994, 1995 and 1996, in addition to developing each festival's theme and programming.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.