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By MILTON KENT | November 17, 2000
The road takes a lot of twists and turns over 20 NFL seasons, but none of them has pointed Pat Summerall and his legendary announcing cadence to Baltimore during that time. That is, until Sunday, when Summerall and John Madden, the NFL's top television tandem, make their way to Charm City for the first time since they were paired together during the 1981 season, to do the Ravens-Dallas Cowboys game (Channel 45, 4:15 p.m.). "We've never done a game in Cleveland. After Sunday, that's the only one left," said Summerall, forgetting that the pair hadn't been to Tennessee either.
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SPORTS
May 9, 2003
College Football Mike Shula, ex-QB at Alabama, hired to coach alma mater Mike Shula became the latest Alabama football coach yesterday, agreeing to terms on a six-year contract worth $900,000 a year, athletic director Mal Moore announced. The former Crimson Tide quarterback replaces Mike Price, who was fired Saturday for off-the-field behavior before coaching his first game. Shula, 37, has spent 15 years as an NFL assistant, including the past three as the Miami Dolphins' quarterbacks coach.
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SPORTS
By Larry Stewart and Larry Stewart,Los Angeles Times | April 21, 1992
CBS has given sportscaster Pat Summerall an indefinite period off to take care of what it calls "a personal medical problem," a network spokeswoman said yesterday.The spokeswoman called it a private matter, but other sources indicated that the problem is alcohol-related.Summerall, who has been with CBS for 32 years, will be welcomed back when he is ready to come back, the spokeswoman said. In the meantime, Jim Nantz will replace him on golf television assignments.Summerall, 60, has been battling alcoholism for some time, and after a bleeding ulcer almost killed him on Dec. 9, 1990, he quit drinking.
SPORTS
By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | February 3, 2002
NEW ORLEANS - Together, they are 136 years old. Between them, they have more than a century of football. Paired for 21 years, they are the longest-running duo in sports. And in terms of television, their run has outlasted such venerable vehicles as M*A*S*H, Cheers and Happy Days. And today, they will be put asunder. When Super Bowl XXXVI wobbles down the stretch, it is apt to get a little misty in the Fox network TV booth. Pat Summerall and John Madden will say goodbye to each other.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2000
Pat Summerall, the dean of NFL television announcers, is expected to announce today that he will retire after the 2001-2002 season. Dan Bell, a Fox Sports spokesman, declined to comment last night, but broadcast sources said Summerall, 70, will step down after calling next season's Super Bowl, his 16th such assignment over a television career that has spanned four decades. Summerall, who was a kicker for the Chicago Cardinals and New York Giants - scoring five points in the 23-17 loss to the Colts in the 1958 title game - has long been one of the top play-by-play voices in sports broadcasting.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 24, 1994
The last word, appropriately enough, went to John Madden, even if it was via tape.At the end of yesterday's NFC championship telecast, CBS left the NFL with these words: "These are the memories, and the great thing is they last forever."So concludes CBS' 38 consecutive years of televising the NFL.Very little is final in the world of television, so we shouldn't get too choked up over this. Already, there are reports that Madden and partner Pat Summerall will be back together in the fall on the Fox network.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 21, 1994
John Madden, it turns out, has a philosophy. And it can be summed up neatly, as most things in life can, in the words of a pop song:Sha la la la la la, live for today.Sha la la la la la, live for today.And don't worry 'bout tomorrow, hey.As Madden approaches his last NFL game with CBS for the foreseeable future, he says he hasn't been looking much past doing Sunday's NFC championship between the Cowboys and 49ers with his partner of 13 years, Pat Summerall. After that, there is the matter of where football's best analyst will be employed next season, but Madden said he really hasn't been thinking about it."
SPORTS
May 9, 2003
College Football Mike Shula, ex-QB at Alabama, hired to coach alma mater Mike Shula became the latest Alabama football coach yesterday, agreeing to terms on a six-year contract worth $900,000 a year, athletic director Mal Moore announced. The former Crimson Tide quarterback replaces Mike Price, who was fired Saturday for off-the-field behavior before coaching his first game. Shula, 37, has spent 15 years as an NFL assistant, including the past three as the Miami Dolphins' quarterbacks coach.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 2, 1994
You've heard the buildup for months. The whispers and nagging questions about their performance have been in the wind since near the end of last season. Finally, on Sunday afternoon, it will be time for the team to deliver on a mountain of promises.The Cowboys? The Bills? The Oilers? The 49ers?Nope, the team of mention is the Fox network, and the stakes are significantly larger than for any football team. All that's at stake on the football field are guts and glory. Nothing short of credibility is on the line for Fox.Fox, heretofore known as the network of Bart Simpson and Al Bundy, wrested National Football Conference games away from CBS, which had carried professional football for 38 years, last December for a whopping $1.58 billion over four years.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 1, 1999
The tale is often told in sports of a superior opponent who plays down to the level of inferior competition, sort of like what happened yesterday in the Maryland-Wake Forest basketball game.But while Fox had no competition for coverage of last night's Super Bowl, the network seemed to play down to the rather bland nature of the game itself.There was either too much, as in graphics, replays and all-around noise, or too little, as in reporting, time to breathe or even time between commercials -- as we saw in the second quarter when, coming out of a break, John Elway was nearly into his throwing motion, on the verge of delivering an 80-yard touchdown pass to Rod Smith, the game's turning point.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | November 17, 2000
The road takes a lot of twists and turns over 20 NFL seasons, but none of them has pointed Pat Summerall and his legendary announcing cadence to Baltimore during that time. That is, until Sunday, when Summerall and John Madden, the NFL's top television tandem, make their way to Charm City for the first time since they were paired together during the 1981 season, to do the Ravens-Dallas Cowboys game (Channel 45, 4:15 p.m.). "We've never done a game in Cleveland. After Sunday, that's the only one left," said Summerall, forgetting that the pair hadn't been to Tennessee either.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2000
Pat Summerall, the dean of NFL television announcers, is expected to announce today that he will retire after the 2001-2002 season. Dan Bell, a Fox Sports spokesman, declined to comment last night, but broadcast sources said Summerall, 70, will step down after calling next season's Super Bowl, his 16th such assignment over a television career that has spanned four decades. Summerall, who was a kicker for the Chicago Cardinals and New York Giants - scoring five points in the 23-17 loss to the Colts in the 1958 title game - has long been one of the top play-by-play voices in sports broadcasting.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | January 21, 2000
The day comes for every great athlete, when the fastball becomes a little more hittable, when the usually easy save becomes more challenging or the 65-yard spiral tops out at 55 yards or less. It's true about broadcasting too. For 19 years, Pat Summerall and John Madden have reigned as sports broadcasting's top announcer pair, but now come the whispers that perhaps Summerall has lost a few miles off his fastball. A number of television columnists and radio talk show hosts have, in less than genteel terms, noted that Summerall, who will be 70 in May, made some noticeable mistakes during last weekend's playoff game, and wondered aloud if it wasn't time for him to retire.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 1, 1999
The tale is often told in sports of a superior opponent who plays down to the level of inferior competition, sort of like what happened yesterday in the Maryland-Wake Forest basketball game.But while Fox had no competition for coverage of last night's Super Bowl, the network seemed to play down to the rather bland nature of the game itself.There was either too much, as in graphics, replays and all-around noise, or too little, as in reporting, time to breathe or even time between commercials -- as we saw in the second quarter when, coming out of a break, John Elway was nearly into his throwing motion, on the verge of delivering an 80-yard touchdown pass to Rod Smith, the game's turning point.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | January 31, 1999
NEW YORK -- If first impressions are real indicators of what's to come, let's say that John Madden didn't make a good one with Pat Summerall.The time was 1980 and the place was the old Tampa Stadium, where Summerall was to be paired with his new broadcast partner for a midseason game between the homestanding Buccaneers and the New York Giants.Summerall, by then, had already reached the summit of football broadcasting. Madden was the promising novice, just a year removed from coaching the Oakland Raiders.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | November 14, 1994
If we haven't known it before, we certainly should know now that Pat Summerall and John Madden are so good together, it's scary.Even with the NFL's hype and hoopla, Summerall and Madden, as they did in yesterday's Dallas-San Francisco confrontation, somehow make it worth the time and trouble.LTC If ever a game had the potential to be bogged down by its advance billing, it was the Cowboys-49ers clash. After all, ESPN began running previews just after Dallas beat the New York Giants last Monday.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 5, 1994
So, that was some thrilling quilting bee on Fox yesterday, eh?Just kidding. In perhaps the most significant single day in sports broadcasting since the premiere of "Monday Night Football," Fox kicked off coverage of the NFL yesterday, and let's just say it's a work in progress.After spending $1.58 billion for four years of NFC telecasts, Fox delivered a lot of sizzle, but not so much steak on opening day.To start, the one-hour, Los Angeles-based pre-game show, "Fox NFL Sunday," was 30 minutes too long, as analysts Terry Bradshaw, Howie Long and Jimmy Johnson had lots to say, but little of value.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | August 12, 1994
When you're a big-time sportscaster, you have to make sacrifices. Take Pat Summerall and John Madden, for instance.They'd love to be at Woodstock, I bet, especially now that Alvin Lee and Ten Years After should be just about finished with their rendition of "Goin' Home" that they started 25 years ago. But, no, Summerall and Madden will be in San Francisco tonight, announcing Fox's first football game, a 49ers-Broncos exhibition p.m., Channel 45)."It's something new for me," Summerall said in a news conference this week.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 5, 1994
So, that was some thrilling quilting bee on Fox yesterday, eh?Just kidding. In perhaps the most significant single day in sports broadcasting since the premiere of "Monday Night Football," Fox kicked off coverage of the NFL yesterday, and let's just say it's a work in progress.After spending $1.58 billion for four years of NFC telecasts, Fox delivered a lot of sizzle, but not so much steak on opening day.To start, the one-hour, Los Angeles-based pre-game show, "Fox NFL Sunday," was 30 minutes too long, as analysts Terry Bradshaw, Howie Long and Jimmy Johnson had lots to say, but little of value.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 2, 1994
You've heard the buildup for months. The whispers and nagging questions about their performance have been in the wind since near the end of last season. Finally, on Sunday afternoon, it will be time for the team to deliver on a mountain of promises.The Cowboys? The Bills? The Oilers? The 49ers?Nope, the team of mention is the Fox network, and the stakes are significantly larger than for any football team. All that's at stake on the football field are guts and glory. Nothing short of credibility is on the line for Fox.Fox, heretofore known as the network of Bart Simpson and Al Bundy, wrested National Football Conference games away from CBS, which had carried professional football for 38 years, last December for a whopping $1.58 billion over four years.
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