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NEWS
May 20, 1994
* Henry Morgan, 79, the scalpel-tongued satirist who became the legendary bad boy of radio in the 1940s and went on to appear on many television panel shows, died yesterday of lung cancer at his home in New York, said Joan Harris, a spokeswoman for the family. His survivors include his wife, the former Karen Sorensen, whom he married in 1978, and a son by another woman, Steve Robinson of Los Angeles. Morgan earned strong critical notices when he used no script and a few notes and ad libbed his way through his broadcasts.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2009
Every time summer comes around, I think about my childhood, when I was fortunate enough to wake up every morning with nothing to do. I didn't have to attend any camps or enrichment programs, sign up for arts and crafts courses, or go on any scheduled nature hikes. Instead, I sat on my front steps with my next-door neighbor and asked her what she wanted to do, to which she would reply: "I don't know, what do you want to do?" We could usually come up with something. One time, we spent a whole day stocking our start-up perfume-making business, snapping the largest buds off my dad's prized rosebushes and putting them in sandwich bags filled with hose water.
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NEWS
April 22, 2007
On April 7, 2007, JAMES C. BOSTAIN, 85, of Baltimore, MD, passed away peacefully at home. Predeceased by his beloved wife Pat in 2002. Survived by a loving daughter; step-daughter; his brother's family and many wonderful friends. He was a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Oberlin College, with a Master's Degree in Linguistics from Yale. He worked for the US Department of State's Foreign Service Institute for 26 years, helping design foreign language instruction curriculums. He gave ~8500 lectures on cross-cultural communication to government, military, academic and public audiences in 49 states (missed Idaho)
NEWS
April 22, 2007
On April 7, 2007, JAMES C. BOSTAIN, 85, of Baltimore, MD, passed away peacefully at home. Predeceased by his beloved wife Pat in 2002. Survived by a loving daughter; step-daughter; his brother's family and many wonderful friends. He was a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Oberlin College, with a Master's Degree in Linguistics from Yale. He worked for the US Department of State's Foreign Service Institute for 26 years, helping design foreign language instruction curriculums. He gave ~8500 lectures on cross-cultural communication to government, military, academic and public audiences in 49 states (missed Idaho)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 5, 2000
Depending on the intelligence of the quarry, a hunter might hesitate to set the same trap in the same place twice. Yet that's what playwright Ira Levin does in his thriller, "Deathtrap." The 1979 play is Broadway's longest-running thriller (more than four years), which is mysterious in itself. Levin pulls identical surprises on his audience in both acts, and while the initial trick gives you a jolt, it's considerably less spine-tingling the second time around, no matter how slick the production.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1997
Judy Garland would have turned 75 today, and TCM reminds us why her life is worth celebrating."Sea World and Busch Gardens Adventures: Alien Vacation!" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Rodney Dangerfield and Dave Coulier are aliens (tell us something we don't know) who visit Earth to watch how we interact with the animals! What an amazing coincidence that they land in a theme park! Lucky for us, there are plenty of celebrities on hand -- R&B group All-4-One, country singer Bryan White, ice skater Michelle Kwan -- to help keep the hour moving along!
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
FAYETTEVILLE, Pa. -- "Helena, Montana. A young actor. 'Brigadoon,' " Wil Love says.He is dragging on a cigarette, warming to the memory of his greatest summer stock story in three decades on the stage."
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2009
Every time summer comes around, I think about my childhood, when I was fortunate enough to wake up every morning with nothing to do. I didn't have to attend any camps or enrichment programs, sign up for arts and crafts courses, or go on any scheduled nature hikes. Instead, I sat on my front steps with my next-door neighbor and asked her what she wanted to do, to which she would reply: "I don't know, what do you want to do?" We could usually come up with something. One time, we spent a whole day stocking our start-up perfume-making business, snapping the largest buds off my dad's prized rosebushes and putting them in sandwich bags filled with hose water.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 27, 1996
"Ruthless" -- a musical about a homicidal child actress -- has to be nasty and has to be nice.At Theatre on the Hill, where the show is receiving its area premiere, director Josh Selzer's production succeeds in being a little of both.Something of a cult off-Broadway hit in 1992, "Ruthless" is an unconventional choice for this small summer-stock theater, in residence at Western Maryland College. If musical theater fans arrive expecting traditional fare on the order of "Gypsy" or "Applause," they're going to be surprised.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | September 22, 1993
It was a yearly ritual. One Saturday morning in early fall my friend Linda and I would pack up a car with buckets of the season's last tomatoes, onions, green peppers and chilies, with jars and lids and labels, drive out to her parents' place in the country and spend the entire day preparing, canning and processing spaghetti sauce and green-pepper jelly.Her father was always ready, with the canning kettles, the grinder, the big pots for cooking. Sometimes the operation spilled into Sunday, like the year Linda made mango chutney -- pure heaven to eat, but murder to pit and prepare.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 5, 2000
Depending on the intelligence of the quarry, a hunter might hesitate to set the same trap in the same place twice. Yet that's what playwright Ira Levin does in his thriller, "Deathtrap." The 1979 play is Broadway's longest-running thriller (more than four years), which is mysterious in itself. Levin pulls identical surprises on his audience in both acts, and while the initial trick gives you a jolt, it's considerably less spine-tingling the second time around, no matter how slick the production.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1997
Judy Garland would have turned 75 today, and TCM reminds us why her life is worth celebrating."Sea World and Busch Gardens Adventures: Alien Vacation!" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Rodney Dangerfield and Dave Coulier are aliens (tell us something we don't know) who visit Earth to watch how we interact with the animals! What an amazing coincidence that they land in a theme park! Lucky for us, there are plenty of celebrities on hand -- R&B group All-4-One, country singer Bryan White, ice skater Michelle Kwan -- to help keep the hour moving along!
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 31, 1996
Broadway may have bid a swift goodbye to "The Goodbye Girl" -- the 1993 musical Neil Simon adapted from his 1977 movie -- but Cockpit in Court is granting it an enthusiastic welcome.Maybe the show's structure, with its perky songs (by Marvin Hamlisch and David Zippel) interspersed between bits of narrative, was too much of a throwback for brash Broadway. Maybe the plot -- an "Odd Couple" story about reluctant roommates who fall in love -- was too sentimental. Maybe the lack of special effects -- not a helicopter or crashing chandelier in sight -- was too austere.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 27, 1996
"Ruthless" -- a musical about a homicidal child actress -- has to be nasty and has to be nice.At Theatre on the Hill, where the show is receiving its area premiere, director Josh Selzer's production succeeds in being a little of both.Something of a cult off-Broadway hit in 1992, "Ruthless" is an unconventional choice for this small summer-stock theater, in residence at Western Maryland College. If musical theater fans arrive expecting traditional fare on the order of "Gypsy" or "Applause," they're going to be surprised.
NEWS
May 20, 1994
* Henry Morgan, 79, the scalpel-tongued satirist who became the legendary bad boy of radio in the 1940s and went on to appear on many television panel shows, died yesterday of lung cancer at his home in New York, said Joan Harris, a spokeswoman for the family. His survivors include his wife, the former Karen Sorensen, whom he married in 1978, and a son by another woman, Steve Robinson of Los Angeles. Morgan earned strong critical notices when he used no script and a few notes and ad libbed his way through his broadcasts.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | September 22, 1993
It was a yearly ritual. One Saturday morning in early fall my friend Linda and I would pack up a car with buckets of the season's last tomatoes, onions, green peppers and chilies, with jars and lids and labels, drive out to her parents' place in the country and spend the entire day preparing, canning and processing spaghetti sauce and green-pepper jelly.Her father was always ready, with the canning kettles, the grinder, the big pots for cooking. Sometimes the operation spilled into Sunday, like the year Linda made mango chutney -- pure heaven to eat, but murder to pit and prepare.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 31, 1996
Broadway may have bid a swift goodbye to "The Goodbye Girl" -- the 1993 musical Neil Simon adapted from his 1977 movie -- but Cockpit in Court is granting it an enthusiastic welcome.Maybe the show's structure, with its perky songs (by Marvin Hamlisch and David Zippel) interspersed between bits of narrative, was too much of a throwback for brash Broadway. Maybe the plot -- an "Odd Couple" story about reluctant roommates who fall in love -- was too sentimental. Maybe the lack of special effects -- not a helicopter or crashing chandelier in sight -- was too austere.
NEWS
July 10, 1991
James Franciscus, who starred in the TV series "Naked City," "Mr. Novak," and "Longstreet," died Monday of emphysema in Hollywood at 57. The actor was born in Clayton, Mo., and attended Yale University. After a stint in summer stock, he was cast in a 1956 film "Four Boys and a Gun." His TV career began in 1958 as Detective Jim Halloran in ABC's "Naked City." He became a teen-age heartthrob playing English teacher John Novak in the 1960s and twice portrayed insurance investigators, first on "The Investigators" and later as blind Mike Longstreet on the ABC series "Longstreet."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
FAYETTEVILLE, Pa. -- "Helena, Montana. A young actor. 'Brigadoon,' " Wil Love says.He is dragging on a cigarette, warming to the memory of his greatest summer stock story in three decades on the stage."
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