Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSummer Session
IN THE NEWS

Summer Session

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 27, 1991
Yesterday's special session of the General Assembly brought no surprises, as legislators shifted dollars from emergency funds and cut spending in order to balance the state budget by June 30. Measures raising Motor Vehicle Administration fees brought some dissent but passed by comfortable margins.Overshadowing the day, however, was the ghost of challenges unmet during the regular session. With boom times of surplus revenues only a tantalizing memory, legislators can no longer afford to ignore the inequities and inefficiencies built into the Maryland tax code.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 1, 2012
There's a good reason that a majority of Marylanders in a recent poll for The Baltimore Sun said they opposed the expansion of casino gambling in the state: We're pretty much grossed out by the whole thing. Politics is a messy business, but the politics behind the casino referendum should be declared a Superfund site. As Curt Anderson, leader of Baltimore delegates to the General Assembly, put it last summer: "It really makes you feel kind of unclean. " The way this matter became a question on the November ballot - a cynical Senate president manipulating the legislature and governor into a summer session, $5 million spent by lobbyists, backroom deals that muzzled opposition and got the governor the votes he needed, tax breaks for casino companies - represents all that's wrong with American politics.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2004
The buzz over a possible summer General Assembly session to legalize slot machines through referendum is fading, with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. calling the prospect "a big if," and House Speaker Michael E. Busch saying that gambling talks have stalled. "I think it's very iffy if discussions go any further," Busch told a breakfast meeting of Baltimore-area clergy this week. Ehrlich reiterated during a news conference Wednesday that he does not favor a constitutional amendment to allow gambling.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 28, 2012
Nobody asked me, but ... It probably wasn't the greatest idea - opening an Asian buffet in Little Italy. Somebody tried that this summer at the corner of Albemarle and Pratt, in what used to be Velleggia's restaurant. They put up a sign and a dragon statue and opened the doors for lunch and dinner. That was in June. Next thing I knew, the place was dark. Just goes to show: One should never try to sell wontons where people are looking for ravioli. Ravioli always wins. -o- Now that a federal judge's ruling will make it possible for more Marylanders to carry handguns, we should require them to display their licenses on their outer garments or hats.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2005
The almost-fifth-graders who walked out of the first day of the KIPP Harbor Academy's summer session were a little different from those who walked in. They stood straighter. White shirts - once dangling down to the knees of some boys - had been tucked in. And they were closer to the ultimate goal: graduating as the Class of 2013. But the KIPPsters are also the first pupils at one of Maryland's first public charter schools authorized under a 2003 law intended to create institutions that can be more flexible and responsive to student needs.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Though the governor has called a May 14 special session to deal with budget issues, the General Assembly's staff and a consultant are already laying the groundwork for a possible second act in late summer. Warren Deschenaux, chief policy analyst for the Department of Legislative Services, said his staff and the firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers have begun a study of the possible effects of expanded casino gambling in Maryland. PricewaterhouseCoopers is under contract with the state to do studies for the commission that decides where slot machines can be located.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2002
As many as 41,000 students will file back into Baltimore's public schools today -- a week after the regular school year ended -- to take part in the city's largest-ever summer school program. Nearly all of the city's more than 170 schools will be open for business as part of a huge effort to get failing students the help they need to advance to the next grade. Tougher promotion standards approved by the school board in January have left more children than ever in danger of being held back.
NEWS
April 21, 2002
Anne Arundel Community College 101 College Parkway Arnold 21012-1895 Web site: www.aacc.cc.md.us Catalog: 410-777-2246. Registration by fax: 410-777-2489. Six-week summer session: May 28 to July 3 and July 9 to Aug. 14. Eight-week summer session: May 28 to July 21 and June 17 to Aug. 9. Eleven-week summer session May 28 to Aug. 9. Fifteen-week fall session: Aug. 26 to Dec. 15. Eight-week fall session: Aug. 26 to Oct. 16. Ten-week fall session: Sept. 9 to Nov. 17. Thirteen-week fall session: Sept.
NEWS
April 30, 1999
The Baltimore Police Athletic League is seeking program coordinators who can earn up to $10 an hour working in PAL centers during the summer session that runs from June 14 to Aug. 20.Candidates should apply by May 7 and have experience teaching, mentoring or coaching. Sessions featuring academics, athletics and arts will run from 9: 30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Mondays through Fridays.Mail or send a resume and cover letter by fax to PAL Summer Program Coordinator Job Search, 601 E. Fayette St., Baltimore 21202.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
In a converted classroom with air conditioning and plush carpeting, students sat at computers yesterday, working to improve their math and reading skills.The students sat about 18 inches from an instructor in a desk arrangement that accommodates only three pupils at a time.The environment provided by Sylvan Learning Systems clashes sharply with the rest of the classrooms at Fort Worthington Elementary School in East Baltimore. The other classrooms have old metal desks and chairs, torn window shades and cold floor tiles.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 21, 2012
Once in a while, a politician lets slip how he really feels about something. To wit: Curt Anderson, leader of Baltimore delegates in the Maryland General Assembly, on negotiating a casino deal with Gov. Martin O'Malley — "It really makes you feel kind of unclean. " I mean, when it comes to political quotations, that's practically Biblical in grandeur. Here's the full precious statement, as reported by the Associated Press: "This thing is all so murky, it really makes you feel kind of unclean.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | July 5, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley will not call lawmakers back to Annapolis on July 9 as he had originally planned, but he intends to announce Friday that he will continue trying to hammer out a deal to expand Maryland's gambling program, according to an official close to the governor. O'Malley said on Tuesday that his time line for calling a special session had "slipped" after a work group he convened to hash out details on the issue failed to reach a consensus. He said that he would wait until the end of this week to make the final call on a summer session.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
The premise behind a Chinese yo-yo seems simple enough, especially to kids eager to be the first among their peers to master a new and unusual skill. In the hands of teacher Jimmy Chiu at the summer culture camp sponsored by the Chinese Language School of Columbia, the hourglass-shaped plastic toy balances and spins on the string he controls with two wooden sticks.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Though the governor has called a May 14 special session to deal with budget issues, the General Assembly's staff and a consultant are already laying the groundwork for a possible second act in late summer. Warren Deschenaux, chief policy analyst for the Department of Legislative Services, said his staff and the firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers have begun a study of the possible effects of expanded casino gambling in Maryland. PricewaterhouseCoopers is under contract with the state to do studies for the commission that decides where slot machines can be located.
EXPLORE
June 27, 2011
Submitting sports notices The deadline for submitting sports copy is 9 a.m. Monday. We prefer email (howardcountysports@patuxent.com). Questions? Call 410-332-6578. Lacrosse The D1 All-Star Girls Lacrosse Camp, led by the University of Marlyland's Kristy Black and Katie Schwarzmann, will be held July 11-15 at Western Regional Park. The camp runs from 9 a.m.-noon and is for girls ages 7-13. Register at 410-313-7275 or at http://www.hcrpsports.com.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | July 13, 2008
The mysterious characters of Chinese calligraphy caught the attention of Diego Leoni, a rising sixth-grader at North Bethesda Middle School. He took a class in introductory Chinese at his school in Brazil and liked it so much that he asked his father to find another for him when they moved to Maryland. That's how he ended up at the Maryland Summer Center for Chinese Studies, a state-run program for gifted and talented students. The two-week program started Monday at Meade Middle School in Fort Meade.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | July 29, 2007
After four weeks of summer school at Running Brook Elementary, nearby residents were used to the steady flow of students at the newly renovated facility. But the sight of two fully grown cattle outside the school's front entrance Friday was a surprise. The two steers - Michael and Angelo - were at the school as part of a challenge issued by Assistant Principals Troy Todd and Brian Vanisko. Todd, who oversaw the 46 students from Running Brook Elementary, and Vanisko, who oversaw the 71 students from nearby Stevens Forest Elementary, joined forces to encourage their students to keep up their attendance at the Running Brook summer school program.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
Every summer since 1996, thousands of people have made an annual pilgrimage to the seat of Carroll County to watch Ravens training camp at McDaniel College. Veterans of the trip have established their routes to the college's practice fields and arranged their itineraries. But for the first-timers, Westminster is unexplored territory. What follows is a helpful guide meant to give the uninitiated a few hints on where to go, eat, and drink during the Ravens' training camp. Best places to park The parking lot at Bair Stadium on Main Street can hold about 700 cars and is available to the public free on a first-come, first-served basis, according to Bob Eller, senior director of operations for the Ravens.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.