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By Anthony Scalfani | July 28, 2011
Say you're a teenager. It's June and summer is ready to roll around. You have a few choices. You can get a summer job, spend your summer sleeping in late and hanging at the pool, or go right back into a school building and learn more. Few would probably choose the last example. But spending the summer inside a school building is exactly what kids from the around the region are doing as part of the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts' annual Teen Professional Theatre. And from the popularity of the program, it seems most kids couldn't imagine a better way to spend their summers.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Edith Henrietta Cooper, a retired Baltimore city public school crossing guard who was once voted the city's most popular safety officer in a newspaper contest, died of a respiratory ailment Aug 20 at Saint Agnes Medical Center. The Irvington resident was 92. Born Edith Henrietta Jackson in Blackstone, Va., she was the daughter of Purcell Jackson and Gertrude Yates Jackson, who were farmers. She moved to Baltimore with her family when she was 6 years old and lived on West Lee Street in a home near Oriole Park at Camden Yards . "We were a poor family, and my mother would have walked to classes at the old Frederick Douglass High School on Carey Street, where she graduated in 1939," said her daughter, Barbara Cooper Lee of Brooklyn, N.Y. "She was the product of a religious South Baltimore family and she received her early Christian nurturing in Leadenhall Baptist Church.
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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2010
Baltimore City school administrator Linda Eberhart envisions a scene straight from a high-tech, science-fiction film after students build robots as part of a new summer school math and science program. "It's all just going to come together," Eberhart said, as she described how about 2,000 students will gather in August to scrimmage the dozens of robots on a field in the city. "Students always ask, 'Why am I learning this?'" said Eberhart, the director of teaching and learning who is heading a host of summer school reforms in the city this year.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 1, 2014
New Baltimore schools CEO Gregory Thornton kicked off his first day on the job Tuesday by visiting summer school sites around the city with new cabinet members and taking stock of some of the work he has in front of him over the next four years. As the new schools chief, who signed a $290,000 contract to lead the district until 2018, visited Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical Senior High School, he talked about expanding summer school programs and college-and-career readiness opportunities to more students.
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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
In addition to swimming with Michael Phelps ' instructors and battling with handmade robots, Baltimore summer school students will be building soapbox cars to help keep their minds revving until the next school year. In a program that began Tuesday, 2,000 middle school students will participate in what the district has themed a "Grand Prix" of summer learning in anticipation of the world-class auto racing event coming to the city in early September. It's the newest programming effort by the school system to join the nationwide campaign to combat summer learning loss and continue the district's emphasis on a summer science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Hundreds of Baltimore City summer school students converged at the Maryland State Fairgrounds on Thursday to have their mechanical alter egos compete in a series of games for the first-ever title of Baltimore City STEM Academy Champion. More than 100 teams of middle-school students — named "Robogirls," "Souldjabots" and even "Wall-E" — pitted robots that they had built over the course of six weeks this summer against one another in the culmination of the city schools' Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
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By Tiffany Gueye | June 16, 2014
Last week, The Sun reported on Baltimore City Public School's (BCPS) efforts to increase academic promotion rates among middle school students by giving them the chance to attend BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life) summer learning programs. The article cited a decline in promotion rates for BELL participants, particularly for 6th graders. While we are disappointed that not all students demonstrate the literacy and math skills they need to be promoted to the next grade, our nonprofit organization, which partners here and nationally with schools to expand learning time in the summer and after school, thinks that focusing on test scores alone obscures important outcomes and raises a key question: What role do summer learning programs have in a student's life?
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
Kenneth Witts is a happy man. He has 25 students who want to study geometry, who chose freely to spend 4 1/2 hours a day, five days a week for five weeks mastering pesky theorems in summer school.These aren't students who didn't get it the first time. This is their first time."I didn't like being in standard math when all my friends are in honors" or G-T [gifted and talented], said Nikki Pontello. By taking geometry with Mr. Witts at Loch Raven High School, she'll be able to take Algebra II as a sophomore at Towson High in the fall and then go on to trigonometry and college algebra.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
The success of Baltimore's summer school seems to prove what common sense has told educators and parents for years: Children learn when they are in a small classroom with a good teacher who has lots of time to plan and expects high standards. In the words of school board president J. Tyson Tildon, "Hard work by people who understand and know the educational process pays off." The success also gives city and state school officials powerful evidence to support their proposals to create tough standards for students to pass from one grade to the next.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 30, 2002
MY FRIEND LEVIN, the retired schoolteacher, tells the story of informing one of his students that he was likely to spend his vacation in summer school. "That's OK," this underachiever responded. "I believe in the school creed." He meant the blithe, in-your-face tribal creed regarding summer school. "What school creed?" said Levin. "`I ain't the only one,'" the lad replied, reciting it by heart and with gusto. The story comes to mind today because of the thing happening in the public schools of Baltimore, whose great thinkers announced this week that the city's classrooms will be filled this summer with hordes of the moping and the academically indigent.
NEWS
By Tiffany Gueye | June 16, 2014
Last week, The Sun reported on Baltimore City Public School's (BCPS) efforts to increase academic promotion rates among middle school students by giving them the chance to attend BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life) summer learning programs. The article cited a decline in promotion rates for BELL participants, particularly for 6th graders. While we are disappointed that not all students demonstrate the literacy and math skills they need to be promoted to the next grade, our nonprofit organization, which partners here and nationally with schools to expand learning time in the summer and after school, thinks that focusing on test scores alone obscures important outcomes and raises a key question: What role do summer learning programs have in a student's life?
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
All that was standing between AuQwan Griffin and a high school diploma was a state biology exam and a conflicted conscience. That crossroads led to the biggest teachable moment of his educational career. Griffin and 10 fellow students at the Career Academy were given answers to the High School Assessments by their biology teacher, according to city school officials, who investigated when they saw unusually high scores at the alternative high school in North Baltimore. The cheating cost Griffin and his classmates their diplomas; they must go back to summer school if they want to graduate.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | June 8, 2014
Baltimore school officials want to attract more highly effective teachers and raise awareness about attendance in summer school after the percentage of middle and high school students successfully completing academic programs plummeted last year. The number of middle school students promoted to the next grade fell precipitously, according to data recently released by the school system, spurring questions about the effectiveness of the Building Educated Leaders for Life program. Building Educated Leaders for Life, referred to by its acronym BELL, a national model that had previously posted encouraging results, runs the city's middle school summer program.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A task force assigned to study a post-Labor Day start date for Maryland schools will recommend to Gov. Martin O'Malley that the summer break be extended, a measure that has been embraced by one Eastern Shore school district but opposed by most of the state's superintendents. State officials said that a task force, convened by the Maryland General Assembly last year to study the issue, voted 11-4 this week to recommend that schools open after Labor Day, a move that has been championed by Comptroller Peter Franchot for its economic benefits to local businesses and the state's tourism industry.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
A slowdown in revenue has Baltimore school officials scrambling for budget adjustments that won't require the system to raid its rainy-day fund or cut central office positions and school programs. Officials face a $31 million deficit in next year's budget, due to factors that include a dried up stream of grant funding, fluctuating financial commitments and a halt to rapid growth in enrollment. Now, the school board has asked administrators to come up with alternatives to their proposed budget reductions, which included staff layoffs, breaking contracts and cutbacks to summer school.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | April 8, 2014
Baltimore city school officials presented Tuesday a budget scenario that could call for "considerable staff layoffs and de-funding key contracts that serve schools" if a $31 million deficit is not closed. In a presentation to the city school board, which can be viewed here , school officials unveiled the first draft of how revenues and expenditures are shaping up for next year. The actual budget for fiscal year 2015 will not be presented until next month, when it also has to be adopted.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | June 19, 1995
What do teachers do in the summer?Some children believe that the teachers climb into the classroom closet and wait for September to roll around, when they step back out, ready to teach again.But Elkridge Elementary staff members are turning to other pursuits this summer.Traveling is on the agenda of Sharon Rollier, who is venturing with her husband to Southeast Asia; Amy Colman, who is visiting family members in Nashville, Tenn.; Steffi Zarikow and Freya Hill, who will travel to the Northwest together; and John Vanoosten, who will go to Chicago and Wisconsin, and then to Germany and France for nearly a month.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
Has anyone thought about the correlation between today's gun violence today and the decline of moral and religious values since the 1940s, '50s and early '60s? In those decades we allowed God in our schools, courts and businesses. Parents were allowed to discipline children when necessary (and the children survived). We were taught to respect our elders, hold doors for others and allow a vehicle to merge into our lane without a case of road rage. It did not take a village to raise a child.
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