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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
Howard County's summer Head Start program for children about to begin kindergarten is fighting to keep operating despite major cuts in state funding. Bita Dayhoff, director of the county's Community Action Council, the private nonprofit group that runs the preschool program, said the state's budget problems have led to reductions of more than half the $103,000 in state money the program received in fiscal 2009. That amount dropped to $55,000 in fiscal 2010 and fell again to $44,000 in the fiscal year that began Thursday, she said.
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NEWS
By Syreeta Swann | August 11, 2014
Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks has an excellent summer program with far better options than other government and privately operated camps in the region. Nonetheless, there are missed opportunities where the department can provide an exceptional service for children and parents, while providing experiences of a lifetime that create future leaders. The greatest missed opportunity for the department's summer program is limited scheduling for the most creative and educational programs.
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EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
A group of students spending part of their summer at Swansfield Elementary have taken a giant step toward becoming citizens of the world, but they will also reap more tangible benefits from a federal grant that is immersing them in Chinese. Numerous researchers have linked studies of foreign languages with higher test scores, including on the SAT. The growing globalization of commerce makes the ability to communicate effectively with people in other parts of the world more marketable than ever, particularly when you're speaking a principal language of the world's most populous nation.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Ari'Yonna Vrathwaite thought she would be a music producer when she grew up, until she started attending a program at the National Aquarium this week. Now, the program that gets students involved in research about the Chesapeake Bay watershed has given Ari'Yonna something to think about: marine biology as a career. "I really like it and I want to come back here again," she said. "We have fun. " Ari'Yonna, 13 and a rising eighth-grader at Commodore John Rogers School in Baltimore, said that so far she liked testing the oxygen level in the water the most.
NEWS
By Syreeta Swann | August 11, 2014
Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks has an excellent summer program with far better options than other government and privately operated camps in the region. Nonetheless, there are missed opportunities where the department can provide an exceptional service for children and parents, while providing experiences of a lifetime that create future leaders. The greatest missed opportunity for the department's summer program is limited scheduling for the most creative and educational programs.
NEWS
April 30, 1999
The Baltimore Police Athletic League is seeking program coordinators who can earn up to $10 an hour working in PAL centers during the summer session that runs from June 14 to Aug. 20.Candidates should apply by May 7 and have experience teaching, mentoring or coaching. Sessions featuring academics, athletics and arts will run from 9: 30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Mondays through Fridays.Mail or send a resume and cover letter by fax to PAL Summer Program Coordinator Job Search, 601 E. Fayette St., Baltimore 21202.
NEWS
June 18, 1998
The United Way of Central Maryland has awarded a $1,500 grant to support Food and Fun, a summer program for children who live in the Bishop Garth apartment complex in Westminster.The program will provide lunch and regularly scheduled activities to children in kindergarten through fifth grade."We are grateful and excited that the United Way has chosen to support this program," said the Rev. Marjorie Decker of Westminster United Methodist Church, a volunteer who helped organize the program.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1994
This summer, while other youngsters are splashing in the pool, 40 Howard County students will be trying to find the value of "X" and learn the composition of the iron atom.The new, five-week Summer Bridge Program, sponsored by the school system's Black Student Achievement Program (BSAP), lets black middle and high school students take mathematics and science lessons to help prepare for the academic challenges of the next school year.The enrichment program begins June 27 and ends July 29 at Howard Community College.
NEWS
By Sherry Stravino and Sherry Stravino,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2003
Sarah Chamberlin of Bel Air is participating in a five-week Summer Program for Women in Mathematics sponsored by the mathematics department of George Washington University in Washington. The program is in its ninth year of encouraging female students in mathematical disciplines by offering them an opportunity to interact with women who have pursued careers in mathematics in academia, industry and government, said Murli Gupta, professor and director. Chamberlin, one of 16 women chosen to participate in the program, is a junior at Hollins University in Roanoke, Va. The George Washington program consists of four major topics, which change each year.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
Celestine Johnson, teacher and mom, is just one of the kids this summer.Just one of the 30 students in Duane Sabiston's crash course in oil painting -- part of the Baltimore County school department's summer art enrichment program. Another student is Mrs.Johnson's daughter, Betserai. Mrs. Johnson and her daughter are classmates in the two-week workshop winding up at Cockeysville Middle School.Betserai has participated in the summer program for the past two years, but this is her mother's first try -- and the first brush with oil painting for both.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The Dreambuilder was making slow progress. The 35-foot-long sailboat meandered in the waters off Annapolis on Wednesday as its teenage crew stood on deck and watched in dismay. “I don't think I've ever gone so fast,” Tommy Pipher, 16, said dryly from the helm. “I think the rudder's broken,” said Ellie Wood, 16. Pipher and Wood, rising juniors at South River High School in Edgewater, are part of a group of 13 students who have been learning the ins and outs of sailing and navigation over two weeks at the National Sailing Hall of Fame, a sailing education nonprofit in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | June 26, 2014
When school let out for the summer, most of the children in Baltimore who qualify for free and reduced price meals - 84 percent - lost access to the three meals a day they count on during the school year. Struggling families and children turn to community leaders who run summer supplemental programs, like Hattie Bailey, who serves meals at Full Gospel Fellowship Church through the federally-funded Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). But since SFSP only provides two meals per day, Ms. Bailey is unable to serve supper to the children in her program if she serves them breakfast and lunch.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A few hundred high school juniors gathered in a ring around a hawk as it devoured a squirrel Tuesday morning at the Naval Academy. Brandishing their smartphones, the crowd groaned and cheered at the action. "Take a picture and move on," an academy midshipman shouted. It was the only blood the teens saw during their week at the Naval Academy Summer Seminar for high school students. But there was plenty of talk about warfare, and about other things that fly — such as the U.S. military's V-22 Ospreys, a tiltrotor aircraft that some of the students might one day fly. The academy's Summer Seminar, which offers three weeklong sessions in June, aims to give rising high school seniors a taste of life at the academy before they apply to colleges in the fall.
NEWS
By Tiffany Gueye | June 16, 2014
Last week, The Sun reported on Baltimore City Public School's (BCPS) efforts to increase academic promotion rates among middle school students by giving them the chance to attend BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life) summer learning programs. The article cited a decline in promotion rates for BELL participants, particularly for 6th graders. While we are disappointed that not all students demonstrate the literacy and math skills they need to be promoted to the next grade, our nonprofit organization, which partners here and nationally with schools to expand learning time in the summer and after school, thinks that focusing on test scores alone obscures important outcomes and raises a key question: What role do summer learning programs have in a student's life?
NEWS
Erica L. Green | June 8, 2014
Baltimore school officials want to attract more highly effective teachers and raise awareness about attendance in summer school after the percentage of middle and high school students successfully completing academic programs plummeted last year. The number of middle school students promoted to the next grade fell precipitously, according to data recently released by the school system, spurring questions about the effectiveness of the Building Educated Leaders for Life program. Building Educated Leaders for Life, referred to by its acronym BELL, a national model that had previously posted encouraging results, runs the city's middle school summer program.
FEATURES
By Sarah LaCorte, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Jamal Cannady of Sharptown reflects on his time at summer camp, his voice warms with the onrush of happy memories and enthusiasm. Ziplining, swimming, boating — he does it all. "Things I never did before in life I get to do at camp. I like to go out on a canoe ride, go in the pool, go camping, go on a nature walk, sing songs and we do a lot of things in the woods," he said. Cannady, 32, has cerebral palsy and is confined to a wheelchair. Since he was 2, he has spent part of his summer at Easter Seals' Camp Fairlee, a camp established to give children and adults with a spectrum of disabilities the opportunity to experience everything offered at a typical summer camp.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 1999
SUMMER BRINGS changes in just about everyone's schedule, especially if you have school-age kids. If you haven't enrolled your pride and joy in a summer program, you still have time.The county Department of Recreation and Parks will be sponsoring summer activity centers again this year. Centers for children in kindergarten through sixth grade will be at George Fox Middle and Bodkin, High Point, Jacobsville, Lake Shore, Solley and Sunset elementary schools.The program runs from 8 a.m to 2: 30 p.m. on weekdays from June 28 through Aug. 6. The cost is $130.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | August 13, 1991
This mayor of Baltimore had no problem making decisions. He knew exactly what he wanted and how to get it."We need lots of trees for oxygen," said 13-year-old Bruce Pendles, who played the part of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke during a morning session of Baltimore's Project RAISE (Raising Ambition Instills Self-Esteem). "If I were really mayor, I would clean up Baltimore. I would organize people to clean up their neighborhoods and then to clean up the water."Bruce Pendles' civic vision springs out of a summer program that started inner city youth thinking about the environment.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Preregistration ends today for YouthWorks, Baltimore's summer jobs program for young people. YouthWorks places teens and young adults between ages 14 and 21 in a six-week summer work experience throughout the city. So far, more than 11,000 young people are have submitted registrations this year, a spokeswoman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said. Those interested can preregister at youthworks.oedworks.com . lbroadwater@baltsun.com Twitter.com/lukebroadwater
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
Severna Park senior forward Grahm Watson had a good feeling about this season. The Falcons have more than a handful of seniors - eight in all - and went 8-16 the season before, but there was a strong sense that this one could be special. The Falcons were in most every game last year, and had a number of three-year varsity players coming back. So far, so good. The Falcons closed out the 2013 portion of the schedule with a 7-0 mark and fully expect the winning ways to continue.
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