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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun staff | June 12, 2003
Santana / Nissan Pavilion Guitar god Carlos Santana and his band play Saturday at Nissan Pavilion in Bristow, Va. The concert begins at 7 p.m. and will take place rain or shine. Santana announced last week that he plans to donate all net proceeds from the summer tour to the fight against the AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Tickets are $20-$59.50 and are available through Ticketmaster. Call 410-481-SEAT or visit www.ticketmaster.com. For more information about the band, visit www.santana.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
The older sister of Phylicia Barnes tearfully said Monday she had allowed her teenage sister to drift too close to the man now accused of murdering her, testifying in the trial of Michael Maurice Johnson that the then-26-year-old's unnerving conduct one summer night was the final blow to their relationship. Prosecutors played for the jurors a 16-minute video they said depicted Deena Barnes and Johnson, along with Phylicia and Johnson's younger brother Glenton Michael Johnson kissing and "nakedly" touching after leaving a June 2010 party on a dare that they go streaking together.
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NEWS
July 12, 1993
Vivaldi, The Four SeasonsI drive, listening toVivaldi, The Four Seasonsin the Baltimore summer nightI listen as the music buildsand watch the faces of too many peoplecrossing the street and waiting by bus stops.I sit in traffic, stuck, one ofthe great white chain of headlightsseen to be beautiful by watchers highin a great, green, glassy gallery.Cars butt in, a young girlgets called a bitchfor letting me in, also, and I think,this is now compassion is rewarded,when one human commits the unspeakable crimeof seeing another as human, too.Cars butt in, she is gone while I think,to be replaced by other faces,proper blank onesstrolling, lolling, rollingin Baltimore's summer nightwhile I sit safe behind glassbut close to the danger andlisten to the sounds ofThe Four Seasons.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
The sun is setting and the sky above Dave and Christine McComas' house in Woodbine turns pink, signaling that the curtain is about to go up on tonight's show. Soon, the wildflower meadow behind their home begins to sparkle, hundreds of lightning bugs floating upward. Ten-year-old Gloria and her friend, Mariel Frith, also 10, leap to catch the fireflies before they dim and disappear. "We need to do it gracefully ," Gloria shouts, laughing. Lightning bugs are easier to catch than they are to count.
NEWS
October 5, 1997
Dr. Haldor E. Rosvold, 81, a retired neuroscientist known as a pioneer in studying the role the brain's frontal lobes and networks play in many mental processes, died of Parkinson's disease Sept. 26 at his home in Silver Spring.He founded a unit to study animal behavior at the National Institute of Mental Health in 1954. In 1976, the unit became the laboratory of neuropsychology, which he led until his retirement in 1982.Survivors include his wife, Mary Rosvold of Silver Spring; three children, Rae Rosvold-Skinner of Portland, Ore., Daniel Rosvold of Middletown and Heidi Rosvold-Brenholtz of Beallsville; a sister; and six grandchildren.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
The older sister of Phylicia Barnes tearfully said Monday she had allowed her teenage sister to drift too close to the man now accused of murdering her, testifying in the trial of Michael Maurice Johnson that the then-26-year-old's unnerving conduct one summer night was the final blow to their relationship. Prosecutors played for the jurors a 16-minute video they said depicted Deena Barnes and Johnson, along with Phylicia and Johnson's younger brother Glenton Michael Johnson kissing and "nakedly" touching after leaving a June 2010 party on a dare that they go streaking together.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | July 15, 2000
ONE NIGHT this week I sat in the middle of the street and howled. The occasion was the appearance of Baltimore's Municipal Concert Band, a group of about 35 musicians who, in keeping with a 140-year-old tradition, put on free outdoor band concerts and sing-a-longs in city neighborhoods during the summer. Wednesday night's performance on Wilson Street in Bolton Hill was a typical rendition of the sing-a-long version of the show, said Stephanie S. Esworthy, superintendent of the Baltimore City Bureau of Music, which organizes the events.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | July 30, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- In the middle of a hot night in the middle of a hot week, I am awakened by something. And because this has happened before, I realize almost instantly what it is. It's the quiet.It's an odd kind of quiet that lies over and around the house this summer on certain nights. It's felt rather than heard. It's a sense that something is missing, but not necessarily a noisy something. What has startled me out of my sleep is only a quiet, not a silence. Most of the sounds I associate with a summer night in this familiar house are still there.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
The sun is setting and the sky above Dave and Christine McComas' house in Woodbine turns pink, signaling that the curtain is about to go up on tonight's show. Soon, the wildflower meadow behind their home begins to sparkle, hundreds of lightning bugs floating upward. Ten-year-old Gloria and her friend, Mariel Frith, also 10, leap to catch the fireflies before they dim and disappear. "We need to do it gracefully ," Gloria shouts, laughing. Lightning bugs are easier to catch than they are to count.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [JENNIFER CHOI] | May 22, 2008
The lowdown -- Ellicott City-based group The Dangerous Summer has worked with producer Paul Levitt, who has collaborated with Dashboard Confessional and All Time Low, and released If You Could Only Keep Me Alive, last summer. The band joins fellow indie quartet the Apathy Eulogy, of Baltimore, for a show at Rams Head Live tomorrow. The Great Escape, Oh, The Story! and Stupid Hero also perform. If you go -- Showtime is 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Rams Head Live is at 20 Market Place. Tickets are $9. Call 410-244-1131 or go to ramshead live.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | August 13, 2008
Picture this: Your life has just gone down the drain, so you swallow a lethal dose of poison. Just as your nervous system begins to fail, you sing a moving and beautiful song. Crazy? Not at all; just another summer night at the opera. As an opera fan, I'm used to hearing, "How can you like opera?" Friends complain that opera is unrealistic: "Who sings when they are dying?" They imagine, as I once did, that opera is for the old or the rich. It's true that opera isn't for everyone. It's an acquired taste.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [JENNIFER CHOI] | May 22, 2008
The lowdown -- Ellicott City-based group The Dangerous Summer has worked with producer Paul Levitt, who has collaborated with Dashboard Confessional and All Time Low, and released If You Could Only Keep Me Alive, last summer. The band joins fellow indie quartet the Apathy Eulogy, of Baltimore, for a show at Rams Head Live tomorrow. The Great Escape, Oh, The Story! and Stupid Hero also perform. If you go -- Showtime is 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Rams Head Live is at 20 Market Place. Tickets are $9. Call 410-244-1131 or go to ramshead live.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | June 12, 2004
AROUND THE time when most people were talking about the sun and the rare transit of Venus, I observed that big orange ball casting its spell over East Baltimore. It was a warm evening, a night when out of nowhere, an old friend from Carroll County asked if I could join him for dinner, preferably at a non-yuppie Baltimore place that, in affirming our affection for the city, would make us reminisce about the good times we've enjoyed here. Suddenly his Buick was heading out of town on Monument Street, past Hopkins Hospital, the old State Theatre and the Northeast Market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
When Baltimore native LaRian Finney surveyed the entertainment options available to his hometown's young black residents, he noticed something -- or, more accurately, nothing. In his mind, the city's late-'90s scene didn't offer much of anything that would interest hip and professional African-Americans. And something, Finney thought, had to be done. The event promoter says he heard a lot of people talk about the fact that there was nothing to do in Baltimore. "I thought there was a void."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun staff | June 12, 2003
Santana / Nissan Pavilion Guitar god Carlos Santana and his band play Saturday at Nissan Pavilion in Bristow, Va. The concert begins at 7 p.m. and will take place rain or shine. Santana announced last week that he plans to donate all net proceeds from the summer tour to the fight against the AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Tickets are $20-$59.50 and are available through Ticketmaster. Call 410-481-SEAT or visit www.ticketmaster.com. For more information about the band, visit www.santana.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 24, 2000
AKUREYRI, Iceland - It is nearly midnight at the Akureyri Golf Club - the northernmost 18-hole course on the planet - but you'd never know it from the activity. Small throngs of diehard golfers, from a group of six alcohol-fueled Reykjavik businessmen to electrical contractor Jim Boudreau from Worcester, Mass., are intently whacking little white orbs deep into the nighttime sky. Local wildlife is acting a bit strangely, too. Birds that should be sleeping scratch in the dirt, and shaggy-maned Icelandic horses gallop in nearby fields.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 8, 1992
The other night I tried to inflict some family fun on my tribe. I ordered everybody in the car for an evening ride.I have fond memories of such outings. When I was kid, an evening drive offered relief from the heat and the boredom that seemed to overwhelm August. The rides usually ended with ice cream cones, fresh peach for my parents, chocolate chip and strawberry for us kids.One of the parental habits I can't shake is trying to get my kids to relive my childhood, at least as I remember it. While I recognize that some forms of youthful entertainment like the pinball machine, have changed since the 1950s, I believe that others, like the evening car ride, should not.Not everyone agreed with me, at least not right away.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | August 13, 2008
Picture this: Your life has just gone down the drain, so you swallow a lethal dose of poison. Just as your nervous system begins to fail, you sing a moving and beautiful song. Crazy? Not at all; just another summer night at the opera. As an opera fan, I'm used to hearing, "How can you like opera?" Friends complain that opera is unrealistic: "Who sings when they are dying?" They imagine, as I once did, that opera is for the old or the rich. It's true that opera isn't for everyone. It's an acquired taste.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | July 15, 2000
ONE NIGHT this week I sat in the middle of the street and howled. The occasion was the appearance of Baltimore's Municipal Concert Band, a group of about 35 musicians who, in keeping with a 140-year-old tradition, put on free outdoor band concerts and sing-a-longs in city neighborhoods during the summer. Wednesday night's performance on Wilson Street in Bolton Hill was a typical rendition of the sing-a-long version of the show, said Stephanie S. Esworthy, superintendent of the Baltimore City Bureau of Music, which organizes the events.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Young Chang and Young Chang,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
Spend a summer evening on the moon, on Jupiter, in the sprays of a meteor shower, anywhere but Earth. With recent afternoon temperatures reaching the highest summer's yet seen, it makes sense to stay indoors during the day and venture out at night.Go out with a telescope, or out to an environment simulating night, such as a planetarium, or out to an observatory. Local stargazing clubs offer opportunities to talk stars, and locations such as the Maryland Science Center, the Harford County Observatory and the Goddard Space Flight Center have plenty of astronomical fun.At the Maryland Science Center's Davis Planetarium, for example, the effect is almost three-dimensional.
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