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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | May 3, 2012
The White House, Department of Labor and others have announced an update on a program to get companies, cities and federal agencies to commit to youths for the summer. Employers have agreed to hire tens of thousands of young people. To find internships and job postings near you, visit the Summer Jobs+Bank . Among the companies hiring in the Baltimore area: BGE, AOL, DAP, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, The Business of Life, Ripken Baseball, Northrop Grumman, Johns Hopkins Health System Corp., and the American Red Cross.
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NEWS
By David Millman | July 22, 2014
I landed my first summer job when I was 16. The qualifications were straightforward - possess strong decision-making skills, the ability to negotiate and compromise with colleagues, and the strength to maintain a calm demeanor in the face of withering criticism. For six weeks during the summer of 1972 I was an umpire. I called Little League baseball and men's fast pitch softball games for teams in Baltimore County. Most of the other umpires were grown men, and I have vivid memories of drowning in my oversized mask and chest protector.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Amber Barner has had a summer job through the city's YouthWorks program seven times, every year since she was 14. But this time is different. This time her job will outlast the summer. That twist comes courtesy of Baltimore's fledgling effort to encourage businesses to hire young adults directly through the city's program, rather than simply donate money to help cover their wages elsewhere. Wells Fargo, part of YouthWorks' new Hire One Youth initiative, decided to hire at least one young person for a permanent job. "It's my first time working at a bank," said Barner, 20, a teller at the company's Hamilton branch.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Preregistration ends today for YouthWorks, Baltimore's summer jobs program for young people. YouthWorks places teens and young adults between ages 14 and 21 in a six-week summer work experience throughout the city. So far, more than 11,000 young people are have submitted registrations this year, a spokeswoman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said. Those interested can preregister at youthworks.oedworks.com . lbroadwater@baltsun.com Twitter.com/lukebroadwater
NEWS
June 24, 1992
A young man of our acquaintance was among the thousands of eligible Baltimore youngsters who had not registered with the city jobs program by the deadline for applications that passed earlier this month. He desperately wanted a summer job, but somehow never got around to filling out the forms available at his high school counseling office.On Monday, he got a second chance when President Bush signed a $1.1 billion emergency urban aid bill to help pay for the cleanup after the Los Angeles riots and Chicago floods as well as finance more than 400,000 summer jobs for poor youngsters.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | April 2, 2008
The slowing economy could affect the summer job market for teenagers and college students, according to a new survey. Of 1,101 hiring managers surveyed by online job site Snag AJob.com, which specializes in hourly positions, almost half said they do not intend to hire additional help during the summer. Many of these managers recruit for retailers and restaurants. The survey has a margin of error of 3 percent. Employers who are forgoing summer hiring said they don't have the budget this year to add seasonal employees (31 percent)
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | July 15, 1993
My first summer job was as a counselor at a recreation center near my home in Northeast Washington, D.C.I was 14 and I learned a lot. For instance, it was for this job that I filled out an employment application for the first time. I got my telephone number and address right, but on a whim, I wrote down "Chris" as my first name.A few days later, someone from the recreation center called to offer "Chris" the job."Chris?" said my mother. "I'm sorry, there's nobody here by that name.""Wait a minute!"
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | July 23, 1991
Standing in 90-plus heat, Germaine Vaughn, 15, lifted heavy boulders into a stone wall in County Home Park in Cockeysville.And he counted himself lucky.Kids without jobs may say they'd rather be home, behind an air conditioner watching television, or at a swimming pool, but the crew of six Towson-Parkville area teen-agers working in the park high above York Road knew better."Really, I'd really rather be doing this," said Germaine, a high school freshman."It gives you something to do, and your parents will love you for it," said Phil Glee, another Parkville 15-year-old.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 19, 1999
Last summer Kevin Hawkins worked as a "wire and cable technician." But don't let the title fool you."That just means I packed computer boards in cardboard boxes, and packed those boxes in bigger boxes," said Hawkins, a sophomore at the University of Maryland, College Park from Cockeysville.By the time Hawkins finished his full-time, $7-an-hour job at a warehouse, he figured he'd untwisted 14,000 wires from pegs.This year he worked harder on the "skill" portion of his application for a summer job in computing.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | August 5, 2003
IT IS NEARLY time for school to begin again, and my 17-year-old daughter is still looking for a summer job. Actually, Jessie is looking for another summer job, having amicably separated from her first employer because she was too busy to work. Like so many teens, she was caught in the vise between earning the money to pay for college and attending the sports camps, SAT preparation classes and admissions interviews that will help her go to college. She probably won't find a job because there are none to be had. This has been the worst summer for teen employment, some officials say, in at least 40 years and possibly since the Great Depression.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli, Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 9, 2013
In each of the past four springs, Annapolis schoolteacher Kelly Rampmeyer has come up short in her attempt to join the team of six Orioles ballboys and ballgirls. But buoyed by the optimism that carried the Orioles on a surprise playoff run last season, the 28-year-old returned to Camden Yards for a fifth straight tryout Saturday with hopes that she could be part of this year's magic. "This would be the best job ever," said Rampmeyer, one of 87 who tried out. "I tried out even when they weren't good.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Amber Barner has had a summer job through the city's YouthWorks program seven times, every year since she was 14. But this time is different. This time her job will outlast the summer. That twist comes courtesy of Baltimore's fledgling effort to encourage businesses to hire young adults directly through the city's program, rather than simply donate money to help cover their wages elsewhere. Wells Fargo, part of YouthWorks' new Hire One Youth initiative, decided to hire at least one young person for a permanent job. "It's my first time working at a bank," said Barner, 20, a teller at the company's Hamilton branch.
BUSINESS
By Ellie Kahn, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
Pikesville High School senior Josh Borris is working this summer, but he won't be paid. Completing a second summer as an intern at Correct Rx Pharmacy Services Inc. in Linthicum Heights, he said, is more valuable than earning money at a traditional summer job. "I want to one day be a pharmacist researcher figuring out how drugs interact with the human body," he said of his summer work at the institutional pharmacy company. "This internship is an experience for the future. " Even as fewer teens seek to work during the summer, some like Borris are pursuing internships or other experiences they hope will give them a leg up on their intended careers.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
Standing before some 30 activists and Union Square neighbors Saturday in a neon orange T-shirt with the words "I am Baltimore," 16-year-old Antonio Ellis recited a gritty poem about how the city appears through his eyes. "Born and raised in the city, where youth are always misunderstood. / Being judged based on skin color or because they're from the 'hood," the Reginald F. Lewis High School sophomore said in a lyrical rhythm. "Living in the city, where there is little chance to succeed.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | May 3, 2012
The White House, Department of Labor and others have announced an update on a program to get companies, cities and federal agencies to commit to youths for the summer. Employers have agreed to hire tens of thousands of young people. To find internships and job postings near you, visit the Summer Jobs+Bank . Among the companies hiring in the Baltimore area: BGE, AOL, DAP, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, The Business of Life, Ripken Baseball, Northrop Grumman, Johns Hopkins Health System Corp., and the American Red Cross.
NEWS
April 24, 2012
Thank you, Susan Reimer , for expressing my outrage over how taxpayers are shafted and played for fools ("From Cartagena to Vegas, partying on taxpayers' dime," April 23). The way the government squanders our money is obscene, and it's too bad Occupy Baltimore won't get on the case. I plan to protest a similar boondoggle perpetrated by the State Department that's ripping us off. All the summer job J-1 Visas so generously available make it more profitable for an employer to hire a foreign student for a job instead of employing an American.
NEWS
April 24, 2012
Thank you, Susan Reimer , for expressing my outrage over how taxpayers are shafted and played for fools ("From Cartagena to Vegas, partying on taxpayers' dime," April 23). The way the government squanders our money is obscene, and it's too bad Occupy Baltimore won't get on the case. I plan to protest a similar boondoggle perpetrated by the State Department that's ripping us off. All the summer job J-1 Visas so generously available make it more profitable for an employer to hire a foreign student for a job instead of employing an American.
BUSINESS
By Maria M. Perotin and Maria M. Perotin,McClatchy-Tribune | May 4, 2008
FORT WORTH, Texas - From flipping burgers to watching over swimmers, the summer job has been a rite of passage for countless teens. But this year, youngsters nationwide may have to hunt a bit harder to land their first paychecks. Nationwide, the unemployment rate for 16- to 19-year-olds rose to 15.5 percent last month from 14.5 percent a year earlier. Meanwhile, the overall unemployment rate is 5.1 percent, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Headed for low? Teenagers' employment has been falling since midsummer 2006, and it's expected to reach a historic low this summer, according to research by Northeastern University professor Andrew Sum. That's largely because kids are facing stiffer competition from older adults, single moms, college grads and new immigrants - all of whom are vying for jobs that were once seen as largely teens' domain.
NEWS
February 24, 2012
After reading all the coverage of George Huguely's murder trial, I feel compelled to write. All the focus on this horrible event has shown just how ignorant society is about alcoholism and its effects on the drinker and the family and friends who surround that person. Alcoholism is a disease. Expecting a parent or worse yet a group of 20-somethings to handle another person's alcoholism is like expecting them to provide a cure for a friend with cancer. It can't be done. Jean Marbella wrote on Sunday that "Huguely wasn't drinking in a celebratory fashion.
NEWS
By Jerry Kammer | February 13, 2012
February may seem a little early to start thinking about summer jobs. But a "cultural exchange" program run by the State Department is already filling jobs in Ocean City and elsewhere - jobs that will not be available when American kids start looking for work. Foreign students admitted through the Summer Work Travel (SWT) program work not only at nearby beaches but all over the country, at restaurants, convenience shops, supermarkets, moving companies, roadside vegetable stands, factories, fish processing plants, and - until recently - at a distribution center for Hershey candy.
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