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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer | July 11, 1993
Q: We're about to furnish and decorate a summer house near the ocean. What kind of styles and colors should we choose in order to give the place a sunny and breezy look?A: Since cool and bright is your wish, the basic idea is to make it possible for light and air to travel freely throughout the house.And the best way to do that is by keeping the interior design plain and simple.Choose a shiny white as a background color, accompanied by beachy accents such as shrimp and coral. Or, if you have a fairly good sense of color, you might try building subtle variations of shades of something like aquamarine blue.
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NEWS
Advertorial Content by RYAN Homes | June 14, 2012
ADVERTORIAL CONTENT With Howard County's popularity, new homes here command premium prices. But Ryan Homes is breaking that trend with the introduction of Pleasant Chase, an enclave of 33 new single-family homes located just east of Columbia. Pleasant Chase offers all the best of Howard County: easy access to Routes 100, 175 and I-95; close proximity to destination and daily need shopping; and plenty of outdoor recreation and family entertainment. It also offers the best new single-family home pricing in the entire county, with prices one would expect to see in a townhome community, allowing buyers to gain the growing room they need at the right price and in the right location.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 24, 1993
The producers of "The Summer House" are comparing it to "Enchanted April," the breakout art hit of last year, for the usual mercenary reason: by capitalizing on the magic of "April," perhaps they can goose "Summer" into some kind of vivid commercial life.Who can blame them? That's what producers do. That's why they're producers.But the contrasts are far more telling than the comparisons. Where "Enchanted" was gossamer and romantic, "Summer House" is raunchy and coarse. It's not a dream of love, an encomium about seizing the moment before passion flees, but something a good deal thornier: a dirty joke.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Rehoboth Beach Rehoboth Beach has been described as being a touch Cape Cod and a little Key West. That's not as true as it used to be. With the real-estate boom, many of the town's old-fashioned clapboard and shingle cottages are being replaced by expensive condos. Affluent vacationers have made Rehoboth their destination beach, which is changing the character of the place - sometimes for the worse, but usually for the better. Over the years, the town has become increasingly cosmopolitan.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 23, 1999
Before Disney put "Beauty and the Beast" on the musical theater stage, the prolific British playwright Alan Ayckbourn had a go at it in an odd little musical called "Dreams From a Summer House," which is receiving its area premiere at Columbia's Rep Stage.Ayckbourn's approach, with serviceable music by John Pattison, is part British sitcom, part fairy tale, part romantic comedy and part musical. Because it tries to be so many things at once, it's probably not surprising that it doesn't excel at any of them.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1999
On my first two jaunts westward to sample Columbia's theater scene, I've watched lethal French aristocrats destroy each other with hyperactive sexual malice ("Dangerous Liaisons"), and a tortured Spanish priest named Ambrosio commit double murder while under Satan's spell. (Or was he?)It seemed the Howard County performing arts community didn't walk on the lighter side.But after taking in Rep Stage's current production of Alan Ayckbourn's "Dreams From a Summer House," I know Howard County actors can do whimsy with the best of them.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 1998
Fire Island, a tenuous 32-mile-ribbon of headstrong houses and shifting sands between the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island, is not a place where nature likes to lie low. It is a barrier island where history is still marked in storms and shipwrecks, and where each spring locals tally the number of houses that "went in" - to the ocean, that is - the previous winter.So when the New York architect Peter Samton tells of building his house and then living "on the edge" in Seaview, a mostly summer community of about 350 families, founded in 1895 by a family of fish trawlers, he sounds a bit like a gnarly fisherman himself recounting a furious battle with the Big One."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Sagi Ward and Ann Sagi Ward,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2004
The picturesque home, galleries and rose gardens of a relatively unknown artist and his wife provide an aesthetic destination in an area marked by Civil War battlefields. Belmont, an 18th-century, Georgian-style mansion on 27 acres on the banks of the Rappahannock River in Falmouth, Va., is a memorial to its former owner Gari Melchers, who with his wife, Corinne, bought the property in 1916. Museums around the world own Melchers' works; he painted portraits of subjects with names such as Vanderbilt and Roosevelt; and his murals cover the walls of the Library of Congress and the Missouri State Capitol.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2005
A second-story porch in the Victorian summer home Frederick Douglass built gave the aging former slave, abolitionist orator, publisher and diplomat a bittersweet vantage point as he gazed across the Chesapeake Bay. The view from Highland Beach, four miles south of Annapolis, crystallized his crossing-over story of escaping from slavery. It was a tale Douglass told countless times to awed audiences on both sides of the Atlantic, stirring anti-slavery sentiments before the Civil War. "As a free man, I could look across the bay to the [Eastern Shore]
NEWS
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,Sun-Sentinel | August 13, 2000
Beach house cooking is at home in the Northeast but is riding a wave in the south. It's not the cuisine of the Caribbean beaches, but the cooking enjoyed in the towns lining the coasts of Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York. Anyone who has lived in the Northeast, particularly New York or Boston, is probably familiar with this cooking that's almost a lifestyle. It developed when people would leave the steamy heat of summer in the city to visit their cottages in Long Island, N.Y., or on Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket in Massachusetts.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2005
A second-story porch in the Victorian summer home Frederick Douglass built gave the aging former slave, abolitionist orator, publisher and diplomat a bittersweet vantage point as he gazed across the Chesapeake Bay. The view from Highland Beach, four miles south of Annapolis, crystallized his crossing-over story of escaping from slavery. It was a tale Douglass told countless times to awed audiences on both sides of the Atlantic, stirring anti-slavery sentiments before the Civil War. "As a free man, I could look across the bay to the [Eastern Shore]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Sagi Ward and Ann Sagi Ward,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2004
The picturesque home, galleries and rose gardens of a relatively unknown artist and his wife provide an aesthetic destination in an area marked by Civil War battlefields. Belmont, an 18th-century, Georgian-style mansion on 27 acres on the banks of the Rappahannock River in Falmouth, Va., is a memorial to its former owner Gari Melchers, who with his wife, Corinne, bought the property in 1916. Museums around the world own Melchers' works; he painted portraits of subjects with names such as Vanderbilt and Roosevelt; and his murals cover the walls of the Library of Congress and the Missouri State Capitol.
NEWS
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,Sun-Sentinel | August 13, 2000
Beach house cooking is at home in the Northeast but is riding a wave in the south. It's not the cuisine of the Caribbean beaches, but the cooking enjoyed in the towns lining the coasts of Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York. Anyone who has lived in the Northeast, particularly New York or Boston, is probably familiar with this cooking that's almost a lifestyle. It developed when people would leave the steamy heat of summer in the city to visit their cottages in Long Island, N.Y., or on Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket in Massachusetts.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 23, 1999
Before Disney put "Beauty and the Beast" on the musical theater stage, the prolific British playwright Alan Ayckbourn had a go at it in an odd little musical called "Dreams From a Summer House," which is receiving its area premiere at Columbia's Rep Stage.Ayckbourn's approach, with serviceable music by John Pattison, is part British sitcom, part fairy tale, part romantic comedy and part musical. Because it tries to be so many things at once, it's probably not surprising that it doesn't excel at any of them.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1999
On my first two jaunts westward to sample Columbia's theater scene, I've watched lethal French aristocrats destroy each other with hyperactive sexual malice ("Dangerous Liaisons"), and a tortured Spanish priest named Ambrosio commit double murder while under Satan's spell. (Or was he?)It seemed the Howard County performing arts community didn't walk on the lighter side.But after taking in Rep Stage's current production of Alan Ayckbourn's "Dreams From a Summer House," I know Howard County actors can do whimsy with the best of them.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
BIG MEADOWS, Va. -- Old-timers may remember such Depression-era terms as "Hoover blankets," "Hoover flags" and "Hoovervilles" or "Hoover camps."They were named for President Herbert C. Hoover, who was blamed for the unemployment and poverty caused by the Depression. "Hoover blankets" were old newspapers the homeless used to keep warm. The flags were empty pockets turned inside out. The 'villes and camps were shantytowns built by the unemployed.The Hoover camp hidden in the Blue Ridge Mountain woods here, however, was no village of tar-paper shacks.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson | September 11, 1990
Catherine Groth remembers Ballestone Manor in better days, when she was a child and her family rented a summer house near the late-Georgian plantation home that overlooks the mouth of Back River and Chesapeake Bay."It was a farm then, and a family named Vesper lived here," she recalled. "They had four girls, and I played with them when we came down in the summer from East Baltimore. It was really nice and so beautiful right by the water."Mrs. Groth was so saddened by the manor's decline into a dilapidated shell that she has dedicated herself to its restoration as vice president of the Ballestone Preservation Society and one of the home's most committed docents.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Rehoboth Beach Rehoboth Beach has been described as being a touch Cape Cod and a little Key West. That's not as true as it used to be. With the real-estate boom, many of the town's old-fashioned clapboard and shingle cottages are being replaced by expensive condos. Affluent vacationers have made Rehoboth their destination beach, which is changing the character of the place - sometimes for the worse, but usually for the better. Over the years, the town has become increasingly cosmopolitan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 1998
Fire Island, a tenuous 32-mile-ribbon of headstrong houses and shifting sands between the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island, is not a place where nature likes to lie low. It is a barrier island where history is still marked in storms and shipwrecks, and where each spring locals tally the number of houses that "went in" - to the ocean, that is - the previous winter.So when the New York architect Peter Samton tells of building his house and then living "on the edge" in Seaview, a mostly summer community of about 350 families, founded in 1895 by a family of fish trawlers, he sounds a bit like a gnarly fisherman himself recounting a furious battle with the Big One."
BUSINESS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | August 18, 1996
Entering Kathy and George Bell's home in Bowley's Quarters, one immediately feels welcomed by the warm and cozy elegance of the decor -- a bay window and rich cherry cabinets in the kitchen, chintz window treatments in a flower pattern that is repeated in the dining and living room wallpaper, a baby grand piano, grandfather clock, traditional furniture, and walls decorated with a mixture of family and fine arts.But the furnishings are only a backdrop to the breathtaking view -- the Chesapeake Bay practically in arm's reach from a double-tier wooden deck off the living room.
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