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NEWS
June 5, 2012
Special Olympics Maryland will host its annual Summer Games at Towson University, June 8-10. The games include more than 1,400 athletes and 200 partners, as well as 800 volunteers who come to help run the event. Athletes compete in aquatics, athletics, bocce, cheerleading and softball. Residents are invited to join the festivities and the celebration — all events are open and free of charge. Highlights include a pep rally Friday, June 8, 5 to 7 p.m., at the university's Auburn House Pavilion, followed by an opening ceremony, 7:30-8:45 p.m., at the Towson Center.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Baltimore is one of 35 U.S. cities that received letters Tuesday from the United States Olympic Committee gauging interest in bidding for the 2024 Summer Games. "I'm excited that Baltimore is being considered and that we've been invited to bid," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Tuesday afternoon. "It's way too early to say what we're going to do. But I think it's a testament to the work that we're doing, shining a spotlight on Baltimore as a sports city. " USOC chief executive officer Scott Blackmun's letter was sent to the mayors of cities in the country's 25 largest markets and 10 others that have expressed interest in hosting the Olympics.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
Hotel rooms stand at 68,000 and rising. Three sports complexes have sprouted in the past year alone. And with its airports and Beltway road systems in place, Washington and Baltimore already handle millions of tourists each year.So what obstacle lies ahead for luring the Olympic Games to the region? An ingredient strangely foreign to cities existing less than 50 miles apart for close to two centuries: teamwork.Much as in a sporting event, winning the right to play host to the 2012 Summer Olympic Games requires clearing political, financial and logistical hurdles, ranging from providing a supportive "sports culture" to corraling corporate backers.
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 12, 2012
Every two years, the Olympics roll around and amazing specimens of humanity like Michael Phelps make the rest of us feel like tree sloths. The Winter Olympics are bad enough -- downhill racers streaking like rockets, snowboarders and ski jumpers defying gravity, skaters making ice look like a dance floor instead of something hard, cold and dangerously slick -- but the Summer Games have the added element of athletes competing with their bodies on...
NEWS
March 19, 1999
EXPULSION of six International Olympic Committee members, joining four who quit, is one step out of the pit the IOC has dug for itself. But alone it does not end the scandal by proving the IOC is purging itself of corruption. Nor does it restore the credibility the Olympic movement requires.The Justice Department is investigating reported bribery in the selection of Salt Lake City for the 2002 Winter Games. Bills before the U.S. Senate would strip tax exemption from Olympic activities.In fairness, the IOC promises to do more, including cooperate with a U.S. Senate investigation and create an outside ethics commission and a commission to plan structural reform.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
The Olympic flame may not be extinguished along the Chesapeake Bay. A key organizer of the region's unsuccessful bid for the 2012 Summer Games is gauging interest in making a run at the 2024 Games. Dan Knise, president and CEO of the Washington-Baltimore 2012 Regional Coalition, believes "there's a little bit of a spark" in the region for another try. "There have been some informal discussions with people. The energy the Olympics create, the optimism it creates, I feel that again.
SPORTS
June 21, 1996
Days until opening ceremonies: 28.Torch update: Louise Logan, a volunteer worker at a Prince George's County hospital, carried the torch up the Capitol steps in Washington.Update: Several thousand tickets to the opening and closing ceremonies of the Summer Games go on sale at 9 a.m. today. The tickets, which cost $636 apiece, can be obtained by calling the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (404-744-1996) and through ACOG's Internet site. There is a limit of two tickets per customer, and a Visa card is the only form of payment accepted.
SPORTS
By Alan Abrahamson and Alan Abrahamson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2003
PRAGUE, Czech Republic - In a surprisingly tight election yesterday, the International Olympic Committee awarded Vancouver, British Columbia, the 2010 Winter Games. Vancouver, long the front-runner, defeated Pyeongchang, South Korea, in the second round of balloting, 56-53. Salzburg, Austria, was eliminated in the first round. Pyeongchang, a resort about two hours east of Seoul, made a strong presentation yesterday before the full IOC membership, suggesting that the games could help promote prospects for peace on the divided Korean peninsula, and led the voting after the first round.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | May 19, 1991
For Americans, the opportunity to combine European travel and the Olympics won't get any better than 1992, when the winter games will be held in the French Alps and the summer games in Barcelona, Spain.It will be the last year in which both the summer and winter games are staged the same year. The winter games then will move to the alternate biennials, starting in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. The next stop for the summer games will be in Atlanta in 1996.Both the French Alps and the Mediterranean seaport of Barcelona are tourist destinations of their own; the addition of the Olympic Games either adds to their lure or detracts from it, depending on your affinity for competition and congestion.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1998
Baltimore will compete with four other cities for the 2000 U.S. Olympic Media Summit to be held shortly before the Sydney Games.Houston, Dallas, Raleigh, N.C., and Seattle have joined the race to play host to the planned three days of news conferences, interviews, photo sessions and social events. The event brings together top athletes in 28 sports, 400 media outlets, the United States Olympic Committee, Olympic sponsors and the national governing bodies -- the administrative bodies for Olympic sports.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
The Summer Games may be winding down, but for two Maryland Olympians, they're just beginning: Georgia Gould is a top contender for the mountain bicycling race on Saturday while Suzanne Stettinius will compete in the very final event, modern pentathlon on Sunday. "At first I was upset being last," Stettinius, 24, of Parkton said Friday from her room in the athletes village. "But now, a lot of people are finished. It's over for them, but I still have my chance. I'm kind of enjoying being last.
EXPLORE
August 5, 2012
While Olympic swimmers in London have the eyes of the world upon them this week, the young boys and girls of the Columbia Neighborhood Swim League put on a competitive meet of their own in the annual All-City championship meet July 27 and 28, at the Phelps Luck Pool. The meet featured five record-breaking performances, including the besting of a 23-year-old mark. Phelps Luck's Casey West won the 15-18 girls' 50-yard fly in 27.06, breaking the previous record of 27.18 set by Owen Brown's Jennifer Atkins in 1989.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
The Olympic flame may not be extinguished along the Chesapeake Bay. A key organizer of the region's unsuccessful bid for the 2012 Summer Games is gauging interest in making a run at the 2024 Games. Dan Knise, president and CEO of the Washington-Baltimore 2012 Regional Coalition, believes "there's a little bit of a spark" in the region for another try. "There have been some informal discussions with people. The energy the Olympics create, the optimism it creates, I feel that again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
No one plays a larger hands-on role than Bucky Gunts in shaping what tens of millions of Americans are seeing each night of the London Summer Olympics. As head of production and director of the opening ceremonies and the nightly prime-time show for NBC, the Baltimore Friends School graduate largely determines the major story lines and images that will form the shared memory of the games - not just in 2012 but possibly for generations to come. A four-time Emmy Award winner for previous Olympics direction, Gunts is at the center of a media strategy that has resulted in record ratings for NBC - as well as some angry criticism primarily in social media.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
Who was that swimmer in the far lane, finishing fourth and failing to medal? A sluggish-looking Michael Phelps launched his final Olympics Saturday night in uncharacteristic fashion, leaving the pool without a stop at the medal platform after a fourth-place finish in the 400-meter individual medley. It's the first time he has exited a Summer Games event empty-handed since his first Olympics in 2000. Instead, his rival Ryan Lochte was the one who swam dominantly, taking the lead in the first 100 meters to win the first gold medal awarded in the eight-day swimming competition.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
A little more than a decade ago, a group of business executives and civic leaders envisioned a moment when the world's eyes would be riveted by events in the Baltimore-Washington area: the lighting of a cauldron followed by two weeks of elite athletic competition. The group hoped to bring the 2012 Summer Olympics to the region — and with it, billions of dollars in revenue and tens of thousands of new jobs. Baltimore would be the scene for soccer, gymnastics, triathlon, cycling and field hockey.
NEWS
June 28, 2001
THE INTERNATIONAL Olympic Committee faces a tough enough job July 13 in Moscow deciding - on Olympic merits - which city should host the 2008 Summer Games. The IOC itself is a flawed institution. But governments trying to push the IOC one way or another for their own power-politics agendas will make matters worse. The White House is wise to have no position. Congress would be foolish to adopt a resolution, approved by the House International Relations Committee, telling the IOC to hold the games anywhere but Beijing.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Baltimore is one of 35 U.S. cities that received letters Tuesday from the United States Olympic Committee gauging interest in bidding for the 2024 Summer Games. "I'm excited that Baltimore is being considered and that we've been invited to bid," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Tuesday afternoon. "It's way too early to say what we're going to do. But I think it's a testament to the work that we're doing, shining a spotlight on Baltimore as a sports city. " USOC chief executive officer Scott Blackmun's letter was sent to the mayors of cities in the country's 25 largest markets and 10 others that have expressed interest in hosting the Olympics.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
NBC's Friday-night coverage of the opening ceremonies of the London Olympics drew the largest TV audience on record for a kickoff of the summer games. According to Nielsen figures provided by NBC, 40.7 million average viewers watched the four-hour-plus telecast, outpacing the Atlanta game by 900,000 viewers while topping Beijing by 6 million and Athens by 15 million. NBC's coverage was the highest-rated Friday night on any U.S. network in a decade. Read my review calling the coverage a "winner" here . Meanwhile, a mostly-media-made mini-flap flared when some in the British press criticized NBC for cutting three minutes of opening ceremonies out of the taped-delay version shown to American viewers in favor of an NBC interview with Michael Phelps.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
Like many Olympic athletes not named Michael Phelps , Suzanne Stettinius is both training and fundraising in these final weeks before the Summer Games. She's made appeals via Facebook and her blog and, next week, will host a party at a Baltimore County tavern where among the auction items will be a date with the athlete herself. A risky proposition for a 24-year-old woman? Maybe, but perhaps not one whose sport involves shooting and fencing and, should flight rather than fight seem advisable, running, swimming and riding a horse.
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