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Summer Flounder

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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 13, 2001
Maryland anglers face sudden cuts in the amount of summer flounder they'll be allowed to catch as the result of a federal court order. The state Department of Natural Resources has scheduled two public meetings to talk about ways to reduce the flounder catch in the coming season, which opens Sunday. The first meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Tawes State Office Building, 580 Taylor Ave. in Annapolis. The second is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the Ocean City Town Hall, 301 Baltimore Ave. The flat-headed, white-fleshed fish is a popular catch among sport fishermen along Ocean City beaches and in the Chesapeake Bay. For the past several years, commercial fishing associations and environmental groups from several states have sued the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, which sets quotas for the flounder catch.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | March 13, 2005
HERE'S A LITTLE news to help push winter off the calendar. The state has relaxed its summer flounder regulations for this season to give both Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean anglers a chance for keepers. On Thursday afternoon, after considering the public's reactions to four size and creel options, Department of Natural Resources biologists decided to lower the minimum size for Chesapeake Bay keepers to 15 inches, with a creel limit of two fish. For ocean and coastal bays, the minimum size has been set at 15 1/2 inches, with a creel limit of four fish.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
The Department of Natural Resources wants to change the regulations for recreational and commercial catches of sea trout and spotted sea trout to conserve the species and prevent long-term economic damage to the commercial fishery.DNR proposes to set size and creel limits for recreational and commercial fishermen and to close the Notebookcommercial season in the Maryland waters of the Atlantic Ocean and its coastal bays from July 1 through Sept. 30.If the changes in regulations go into effect after public hearings May 3 and May 5, recreational fishermen would be limited to 10 of each species per day for the remainder of this year and to five of each species per day starting next year.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 6, 2002
If you thought last year's recreational summer flounder season was bad, wait until you see the 2002 edition. The gloomy forecast will be delivered Friday morning in Ocean City at a public meeting called by the top folks at the Department of Natural Resources. Last April, anglers were told that Maryland would have to cut its flounder take by nearly 50 percent. The state responded by imposing a later start for both ocean and bay seasons and a two-week moratorium in mid-summer. But, says Eric Schwaab, the head of the DNR fisheries, it wasn't enough.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 16, 1993
Yesterday, the Department of Natural Resources revised the BTC seasons and regulations for the recreational summer flounder fishing this year.The opening day for summer flounder in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries will be June 1, and the minimum length will be 14 inches.The season will run through Oct. 30. The creel limit will be 10 per day.The season in tidal waters of the Atlantic Ocean will be May 15 through Sept. 30, with the same minimum length and creel limit.DNR secretary Torrey C. Brown said summer flounder are in need of conservation and the regulations are in line with the management plans of Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission and the Chesapeake Bay Program.
NEWS
By Sarah Chasis | December 1, 1999
THE OCEAN off our mid-Atlantic coast provides rest, relaxation and seafood for millions of people. But beneath the waters lurks a crisis created by too many boats chasing too few fish.And the response by the people who manage fisheries in our region has been a classic case of too little, too late. Over-fishing is widespread throughout the United States.According to a recently released government study, more than 40 percent of the species whose status has been studied are classified as over-fished.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | January 24, 1993
One weekday last September, off the mouth of the Choptank River, the flounder fishing was only a little short of incredible. In fact, had Keith Walters and I wanted to fish out the balance of the rising tide, we could have caught keepers until we ran out of minnows.Instead, we kept perhaps a dozen flounder from 15 to 23 inches and headed in.This year, the Department of Natural Resources is proposing to change the regulations for the recreational summer flounder fishery to ensure that quality fishing continues.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1995
The second-most popular fish taken from fresh water across the United States is the catfish, an ugly scavenger that can hit baits like a freight train and outfight America's most popular catch, the black bass.As the summer warms, fishing for cats in fresh and tidal rivers picks up in Maryland as catfish become more active and concentrate in areas with heavy bottom structure.Fishing for cats doesn't require the gear or finesse that fishing for black bass does, but attention to a few basic details can make catching them easier.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 6, 2002
If you thought last year's recreational summer flounder season was bad, wait until you see the 2002 edition. The gloomy forecast will be delivered Friday morning in Ocean City at a public meeting called by the top folks at the Department of Natural Resources. Last April, anglers were told that Maryland would have to cut its flounder take by nearly 50 percent. The state responded by imposing a later start for both ocean and bay seasons and a two-week moratorium in mid-summer. But, says Eric Schwaab, the head of the DNR fisheries, it wasn't enough.
NEWS
By Capt.Bob Spore | August 16, 1991
Wednesday seemed like a good day to take off and go fishing. I jumped in my good friend Tom Hassing's 31-foot Rampage, and we went down the bay in search of summer flounder.The summer flounder -- or fluke if you live along the coast -- is one of the most sought-after finfish in Maryland and elsewhere along the Atlantic coast.Adult flounder move inshore in the spring and summer and offshoreduring the late fall. They spawn as they move offshore and as the eggs and young develop, they move inshore to the summer nursery and growing grounds in the coastal areas.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Joel McCord and Candus Thomson and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2001
OCEAN CITY - Maryland must slash its harvest of summer flounder nearly in half this year, and nowhere is that felt more acutely than here, where a large part of the tourist dollar is spent on fishing trips. More than 150 angry charter boat captains, tackle shop operators and recreational fishermen packed the city council chambers last night to complain bitterly about the cuts. Phil Jones, head of resource management for the fisheries division of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, had hardly begun his explanation of the quotas when he was interrupted.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 13, 2001
Maryland anglers face sudden cuts in the amount of summer flounder they'll be allowed to catch as the result of a federal court order. The state Department of Natural Resources has scheduled two public meetings to talk about ways to reduce the flounder catch in the coming season, which opens Sunday. The first meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Tawes State Office Building, 580 Taylor Ave. in Annapolis. The second is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the Ocean City Town Hall, 301 Baltimore Ave. The flat-headed, white-fleshed fish is a popular catch among sport fishermen along Ocean City beaches and in the Chesapeake Bay. For the past several years, commercial fishing associations and environmental groups from several states have sued the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, which sets quotas for the flounder catch.
NEWS
By Sarah Chasis | December 1, 1999
THE OCEAN off our mid-Atlantic coast provides rest, relaxation and seafood for millions of people. But beneath the waters lurks a crisis created by too many boats chasing too few fish.And the response by the people who manage fisheries in our region has been a classic case of too little, too late. Over-fishing is widespread throughout the United States.According to a recently released government study, more than 40 percent of the species whose status has been studied are classified as over-fished.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1998
Rockfish, freshwater trout and black bass get much of the attention of spring fishermen in the Baltimore-Annapolis area. But along Maryland's Atlantic Coast, the summer flounder run appears to be strong at Ocean City this season.According to Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Service biologist Jim Casey, after stocks declined in the 1980s summer flounder are recovering and good numbers of larger fish should be available this year.Fisheries Service biologist Martin L. Gary, who compiles catch reports from around the state, said this week that the Thorofare, Route 50 bridge and the East Channel behind Ocecan City all have been turning up nice catches of flounder ranging to more than seven pounds.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1996
It has been almost a year since James Jensen was in the area for a medical conference and managed to slip away for an afternoon of sailing and fishing off Kent Island. But a few minutes during that lazy afternoon stand out as proof of how good a bad day of fishing on the Chesapeake Bay can be.It was the third week of May, a Wednesday, when only a handful of charter boats were working the edges of the shipping channel near Brickhouse Bar.The air was light, the bay almost calm, and Jensen, a radiologist from Kentucky, had been deep into discussions about extraterrestrials, the power of the pyramids, and the fighting prowess of Lake Cumberland catfish and Lake Erie steelheads.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1995
The second-most popular fish taken from fresh water across the United States is the catfish, an ugly scavenger that can hit baits like a freight train and outfight America's most popular catch, the black bass.As the summer warms, fishing for cats in fresh and tidal rivers picks up in Maryland as catfish become more active and concentrate in areas with heavy bottom structure.Fishing for cats doesn't require the gear or finesse that fishing for black bass does, but attention to a few basic details can make catching them easier.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Joel McCord and Candus Thomson and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2001
OCEAN CITY - Maryland must slash its harvest of summer flounder nearly in half this year, and nowhere is that felt more acutely than here, where a large part of the tourist dollar is spent on fishing trips. More than 150 angry charter boat captains, tackle shop operators and recreational fishermen packed the city council chambers last night to complain bitterly about the cuts. Phil Jones, head of resource management for the fisheries division of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, had hardly begun his explanation of the quotas when he was interrupted.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | January 31, 1993
Early last week the Department of Natural Resources got an earful at a public meeting on its fisheries management plan for summer flounder.According to William P. Jensen, director of DNR's Tidewater Fisheries Division, the department's target is a 14-inch minimum, a daily limit of six per angler and a season that would run from May through September.Although Monday's meeting was not called to discuss the specifics of the management plan, Steve Early, assistant to the director of Tidewater Fisheries, and flounder specialist Jim Upoff found themselves facing some 50 Maryland anglers.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 19, 1995
Maryland's flounder is a bashful sort of sole. Our flounder is, at best, distantly related to the fabled Dover sole, the flatfish of choice of European chefs.But when you are related even remotely to the famous, there is a tendency to play up the connection. So around here a flounder with a yellow tail sometimes ends up getting called "lemon sole." While the taste of lemon sole is not as distinctive as that of Dover sole, it is still pleasing. The white flesh has a sweet, faintly nutty flavor that is not overpowering.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
The Department of Natural Resources wants to change the regulations for recreational and commercial catches of sea trout and spotted sea trout to conserve the species and prevent long-term economic damage to the commercial fishery.DNR proposes to set size and creel limits for recreational and commercial fishermen and to close the Notebookcommercial season in the Maryland waters of the Atlantic Ocean and its coastal bays from July 1 through Sept. 30.If the changes in regulations go into effect after public hearings May 3 and May 5, recreational fishermen would be limited to 10 of each species per day for the remainder of this year and to five of each species per day starting next year.
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