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By Mike Giuliano | June 29, 2011
It's hard to believe that the 1980 movie "Xanadu" could have the potential to make anything other than a worst-movies list, but this cinematic flop magically served as the inspiration for a successful Broadway musical in 2007. Provided you're in the mood for what amounts to summer camp, "Xanadu" is silly fun at Toby's Baltimore Dinner Theatre. The movie's plot about an ancient Greek muse inspiring a modern American painter was so stupid that not even chart-topping Olivia Newton-John and the venerable Gene Kelly could save it. Although the movie bombed, it developed a cult following that must have encompassed, oh, at least a few dozen people nationwide.
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NEWS
By Syreeta Swann | August 11, 2014
Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks has an excellent summer program with far better options than other government and privately operated camps in the region. Nonetheless, there are missed opportunities where the department can provide an exceptional service for children and parents, while providing experiences of a lifetime that create future leaders. The greatest missed opportunity for the department's summer program is limited scheduling for the most creative and educational programs.
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NEWS
By Bob Graham | June 29, 2014
Summer camp beckons, giving children a much-need break from the rigors of school. At camp, children may explore nature and new interests away from the comfortable, familiar surroundings of home. This freedom to explore also extends to the adults who supervise the campers. Each year, as the first fireflies appear and humidity drips from day into night, I fondly recall my years as a camp counselor: those long-lost days of swim lessons, Popsicle stick creations and "Capture the Flag" games.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
The campers formed two single-file lines and practiced a hip-hop dance exercise - kick-step-step, kick-step-step - from one side of the classroom to the other as pulsating beats reverberated off the walls. The dance lesson at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis came free of charge. The youngsters visit the hall each week during their time at a camp run by We Care and Friends, a nonprofit that offers support and resources for families in need. Maryland Hall officials have had a long-standing relationship with We Care and Friends founder Larry Griffin, who has had his campers stop by each week for an indoor, climate-controlled lunch.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
Yellow school buses fanned out to the House of Ruth and the Druid Heights YWCA on Monday to pick up 140 homeless children for the first day of what promises to be a happy summer spent at Camp St. Vincent in Patterson Park. The day camp for children ages 5 to 12 holds classes in reading, math, art and music in a Head Start building at Patterson Park Avenue and Gough Street. Daily swimming takes place at the park pool, and a circle of tents house other activities. There is also a social and emotional development component of the curriculum that teaches life lessons in themes of respect, self-esteem, and love of the family and community.
EXPLORE
April 30, 2012
Lose The Training Wheels, a program that teaches individuals ages 8 and older with disabilities to ride a conventional two-wheel bicycle, is accepting applications for its second annual summer camp held at and sponsored by Mountain Christian Church in Joppa July 30 to Aug. 3. "Last year's campers were amazing," volunteer camp director and Harford County resident Lori Ginley said in a press release announcing the camps. "To see the determination and sense of accomplishment in their eyes as they progressed each day until they became independent two-wheel bicycle riders was truly inspirational.
FEATURES
By Sarah LaCorte, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Jamal Cannady of Sharptown reflects on his time at summer camp, his voice warms with the onrush of happy memories and enthusiasm. Ziplining, swimming, boating — he does it all. "Things I never did before in life I get to do at camp. I like to go out on a canoe ride, go in the pool, go camping, go on a nature walk, sing songs and we do a lot of things in the woods," he said. Cannady, 32, has cerebral palsy and is confined to a wheelchair. Since he was 2, he has spent part of his summer at Easter Seals' Camp Fairlee, a camp established to give children and adults with a spectrum of disabilities the opportunity to experience everything offered at a typical summer camp.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
As pedestrians scurried through the sunshine that bathed Patterson Park this week, 12-year-old Daniel John took refuge under a tree, poring over a book, enjoying a space all his own. "If I were at home, I'd probably be watching TV for over seven hours," said the rising seventh-grader at Montebello Elementary/Middle School, who is living at a local shelter. Daniel is one of 130 Baltimore city and county students who are finding stability in a summer learning program exclusively for homeless students — a population that has ballooned in the city and doubled in Baltimore County in the last five years.
NEWS
By Vikki Valentine and Vikki Valentine,Contributing Writer | July 26, 1995
A recent playground brawl at Wilde Lake Middle School between 13-year-olds Michael Davis and Alywin Thompson landed the youths in court -- the court of Columbia's Each One Reach One summer camp.The fight started when Alywin made a derogatory comment to Michael, who responded with his fists. So with camp members -- mostly boys from Wilde Lake and Harper's Choice middle schools -- as lawyers and camp co-founder Vince Guida as judge, a verdict was reached: Both youths were guilty.They should have found a better way to relate to each other and resolve their conflicts, said Michael, who'll enter ninth grade at Wilde Lake High School this fall.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
The sign inside Howard Community College's Hickory Ridge Building pointed to a summer camp class called "Oooo, Goo and Stinky Too: Gross Science. " Inside the classroom, elementary school kids discovered how inventive they could be with household products, mixing corn starch, cocoa and red dye to make fake blood and fueling toy rockets with Alka Seltzer. The hands-on class is among dozens offered during HCC's Kids on Campus, a summer education enrichment program for youths ages 7 to 17 that is celebrating its 25th year.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
More than 50 Maryland middle-schools students have been building a house during a summer camp in Annapolis - not a routine task for teens and preteens. "I came here skeptical," acknowledged JJ Jennings, 13, a rising eighth-grader at the Key School in Annapolis. "Why am I paying to do labor?" To be fair, the house is a small-scale project - 210 square feet and sitting on trailer in the Key School parking lot. But that doesn't mean it's a not a big deal. Complete with solar panels and a rainwater filtration system, the compact home is designed to have the smallest possible carbon footprint.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
An aquatics instructor at a summer camp for youngsters at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore has been charged with sexual solicitation of a minor, police said. Charles David Beaver, 58, a former teacher at Westminster High School, was arrested Tuesday at a Baltimore County hotel, police said. Police said the Carroll County man had communicated online with a person he believed was a pimp to arrange a meeting at the hotel with two teenage boys for sex. The supposed pimp was actually a Baltimore County detective.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
One child was killed and eight others were injured by falling tree branches at a Christian summer camp in Carroll County during Tuesday night's storm, a fire department spokesman said. The children were on their way inside at River Valley Ranch in the 4400 block of Grave Run Rd. in Manchester around 7 p.m. when heavy winds brought branches from several trees down on top of them, said Donald Fair, public information officer for the Lineboro Volunteer Fire Department. Fair called the storm "very sudden" and said it caused "massive damage to the trees" in the area.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Sprawled out on their stomachs or hunched over pieces of paper, two dozen preteens gathered in the cool darkness of the theater stage and mulled over what kind of legacy they would leave behind. Tracie Jiggetts, responsible for helping to shape their self-confidence and social skills at a two-week summer camp held at Towson University, paced the floor and prompted the children to say how they wanted to be remembered when the camp ends Thursday. "I wanted to leave behind my positive attitude and I want people to remember me for my kindness," one girl said in a near-whisper.
NEWS
By Bob Graham | June 29, 2014
Summer camp beckons, giving children a much-need break from the rigors of school. At camp, children may explore nature and new interests away from the comfortable, familiar surroundings of home. This freedom to explore also extends to the adults who supervise the campers. Each year, as the first fireflies appear and humidity drips from day into night, I fondly recall my years as a camp counselor: those long-lost days of swim lessons, Popsicle stick creations and "Capture the Flag" games.
NEWS
By Cheryl Clemens | June 10, 2014
Forget popsicle-stick art and freeze tag. So many of today's summer camps are unique, a camper could spend every week of the summer at a new one and never repeat an activity. Over the next three months, Howard County Recreation and Parks will hold more than 300 camps for toddlers to teenagers ranging in themes from rock climbing, chess and musical theater to skate boarding, robotics and cooking. More than 13,000 campers are expected to register this year, more than a third of the county's camps already had waiting lists by early May. “It can be hard to keep up with the demand,” said Dawn Thomas, the county's adventure, nature and outdoor recreation manager.
NEWS
By Steve Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Some youngsters attend summer camp to swim or play sports, but Mona King and Marilyn Smith spent Wednesday morning getting acquainted with horses. The two 13-year-olds, both rising eighth-graders at Elkridge Landing Middle School, groomed and cleaned their new equine friends at the Days End Farm Horse Rescue complex in Woodbine. "I was 2 when I first got up close and touched a horse," said Mona, a Hanover resident who said she wants to be a veterinarian. The visit to Days End, which provides care for abused and neglected horses, was part of a summer camp experience sponsored by the Columbia Association that has young campers spending most of the week caring for others.
FEATURES
By Sarah LaCorte, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Jamal Cannady of Sharptown reflects on his time at summer camp, his voice warms with the onrush of happy memories and enthusiasm. Ziplining, swimming, boating — he does it all. "Things I never did before in life I get to do at camp. I like to go out on a canoe ride, go in the pool, go camping, go on a nature walk, sing songs and we do a lot of things in the woods," he said. Cannady, 32, has cerebral palsy and is confined to a wheelchair. Since he was 2, he has spent part of his summer at Easter Seals' Camp Fairlee, a camp established to give children and adults with a spectrum of disabilities the opportunity to experience everything offered at a typical summer camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
In 1974, when Meg Wolitzer was 15 years old, she went away to a camp for aspiring young artists. Once that summer was over, Wolitzer never again thought of herself in quite the same way. Unlike Wolitzer, most of the kids she met came from privileged backgrounds. They attended private schools, lived in apartments overlooking New York's Central Park, and sprinkled their conversations with literary allusions. In their still-forming personalities, irony mixed uneasily with idealism. They had big dreams of one day living a life of the mind.
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