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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
The plaintiffs in a high-profile land dispute with Johns Hopkins University filed for summary judgment in their case against the university on Tuesday, one day after JHU filed a similar motion. The lawsuit was originally filed in November by family members of Elizabeth Beall Newell, who along with her siblings sold 108 acres of their family's Belward Farm near Gaithersburg to JHU in 1989 for $5 million. The sale, of land the family said was valued at $54 million, came with certain stipulations, including that the land be used for research or education purposes.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
The group battling with Carroll County commissioners over Christian prayers at their meetings asked a judge Tuesday to order a "permanent injunction" on the practice, which they say alienates some community members. "Public officials are not in the business of offering Christian prayers," said Roy Speckhardt, executive director of the American Humanist Association, a plaintiff in the case. He called the invocations "unconstitutional. " With the latest filing by the plaintiffs for a summary judgment, both sides are now asking the judge to make a final ruling on the case rather than holding a trial.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Attorneys for the Johns Hopkins University on Monday filed a motion for summary judgment in a lawsuit claiming the university is violating a land-use agreement it signed with a Montgomery County family more than 20 years ago. Elizabeth Beall Banks and her siblings sold 108 acres of their family's Belward Farm to the university in 1989 under specific stipulations, including that the property be used for research or education purposes. The suit, led by Banks' nephew John Timothy Newell, claims Hopkins' plans to construct high-rise buildings on the land violate the agreement and are out of line with what Banks and her siblings were told would be a low-rise campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
A tiny water view painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir is finally headed back to the city where a judge has ruled that it belongs — 62 years, one month and 24 days after it was reported stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art . During a hearing Friday, Judge Leonie M. Brinkema of the U.S. District Court in Eastern Virginia granted the museum's request to throw out Marcia "Martha" Fuqua's ownership claim for the 1879 artwork, "Paysage Bords de...
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge is set to hear another round of arguments about the $1.5 billion State Center redevelopment, an ambitious overhaul 28 acres in midtown Baltimore. Judge Althea M. Handy has been asked to determine whether there still are disputed facts in the case, launched by a group of downtown businesses and landlords in 2010. A hearing on the issue is schedule for Tuesday afternoon. Opponents of the development, in the pipeline since the mid-2000s, allege that it would siphon tenants from downtown office buildings and that a noncompetitive process was used to select the developers.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
The group battling with Carroll County commissioners over Christian prayers at their meetings asked a judge Tuesday to order a "permanent injunction" on the practice, which they say alienates some community members. "Public officials are not in the business of offering Christian prayers," said Roy Speckhardt, executive director of the American Humanist Association, a plaintiff in the case. He called the invocations "unconstitutional. " With the latest filing by the plaintiffs for a summary judgment, both sides are now asking the judge to make a final ruling on the case rather than holding a trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
A court hearing Friday could determine the future of a small Renoir painting that was reported stolen 62 years ago from the Baltimore Museum of Art - while the artwork's clouded past is becoming even more of a mystery. U.S. District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema will hear arguments in her Alexandria, Va., courtroom to resolve an ownership dispute involving the 1879 pink and green landscape known as "Paysage Bords de Seine. The museum and a 51-year-old woman who once called herself "Renoir Girl" are seeking title to the oil painting on a linen napkin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
A tiny water view painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir is finally headed back to the city where a judge has ruled that it belongs — 62 years, one month and 24 days after it was reported stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art . During a hearing Friday, Judge Leonie M. Brinkema of the U.S. District Court in Eastern Virginia granted the museum's request to throw out Marcia "Martha" Fuqua's ownership claim for the 1879 artwork, "Paysage Bords de...
NEWS
By LISA GOLDBERG | October 1, 2005
A federal district judge ruled yesterday that there are too many lingering questions about the motivation behind a Baltimore County law that limits the location of methadone clinics to determine without trial whether the county or the operator of one such clinic should prevail in a three-year-old lawsuit. Judge Catherine C. Blake denied motions by the county and A Helping Hand LLC for summary judgment in a suit in which the Pikesville clinic alleges that the county's zoning law is discriminatory.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 30, 1993
BALTIMORE -- An attorney for the city of Cambridge asked a federal judge yesterday for a summary judgment in an $18 million wrongful death suit filed against the town and one of its police officers.The suit stemmed from a March 10, 1989 incident in which the ex-boyfriend of Carol L. Pinder set fire to her Cambridge home, killing her three children. Donald Pittman pleaded guilty and was sentenced to three consecutive life terms.In her suit filed in U.S. District Court in March 1992, Carol L. Pinder claimed that Cambridge government and police failed to protect her and her family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
A court hearing Friday could determine the future of a small Renoir painting that was reported stolen 62 years ago from the Baltimore Museum of Art - while the artwork's clouded past is becoming even more of a mystery. U.S. District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema will hear arguments in her Alexandria, Va., courtroom to resolve an ownership dispute involving the 1879 pink and green landscape known as "Paysage Bords de Seine. The museum and a 51-year-old woman who once called herself "Renoir Girl" are seeking title to the oil painting on a linen napkin.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge is set to hear another round of arguments about the $1.5 billion State Center redevelopment, an ambitious overhaul 28 acres in midtown Baltimore. Judge Althea M. Handy has been asked to determine whether there still are disputed facts in the case, launched by a group of downtown businesses and landlords in 2010. A hearing on the issue is schedule for Tuesday afternoon. Opponents of the development, in the pipeline since the mid-2000s, allege that it would siphon tenants from downtown office buildings and that a noncompetitive process was used to select the developers.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
A family that sued Johns Hopkins University over its intent to build high-rise buildings on a gift of land intended for a low-rise campus will appeal a judge's decision to allow the institution to move forward with its plans. In a statement, the relatives of Elizabeth Beall Banks—who with her family sold 108 acres of her family's Belward Farm to Hopkins for $5 million more than 20 years ago—said it would appeal an Oct. 26 ruling by Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge Ronald B. Rubin that removes all restrictions on the development of the property, which Hopkins intends to use for a research institution in Gaithersburg.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
The plaintiffs in a high-profile land dispute with Johns Hopkins University filed for summary judgment in their case against the university on Tuesday, one day after JHU filed a similar motion. The lawsuit was originally filed in November by family members of Elizabeth Beall Newell, who along with her siblings sold 108 acres of their family's Belward Farm near Gaithersburg to JHU in 1989 for $5 million. The sale, of land the family said was valued at $54 million, came with certain stipulations, including that the land be used for research or education purposes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Attorneys for the Johns Hopkins University on Monday filed a motion for summary judgment in a lawsuit claiming the university is violating a land-use agreement it signed with a Montgomery County family more than 20 years ago. Elizabeth Beall Banks and her siblings sold 108 acres of their family's Belward Farm to the university in 1989 under specific stipulations, including that the property be used for research or education purposes. The suit, led by Banks' nephew John Timothy Newell, claims Hopkins' plans to construct high-rise buildings on the land violate the agreement and are out of line with what Banks and her siblings were told would be a low-rise campus.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Dr. Mark Midei knew about ongoing state and federal investigations into heart stent procedures he performed when he gave up his right to sue St. Joseph Medical Center, meaning he couldn't have been duped into it, a Baltimore County judge ruled Monday. Judge Mickey Norman called the language in a release Midei signed "clear and unambiguous" and disputed Midei's claims that he didn't know further consequences could result from the investigations. The embattled cardiologist sought to hold St. Joseph responsible for destroying his reputation, leaving him unemployed, but Norman dismissed the case before it reached a trial.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | July 15, 2008
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge is to decide today whether to let stand a $60 million lawsuit by former Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark against the city and Gov. Martin O'Malley, who, as mayor, fired Clark in 2004. Judge Albert J. Matricciani Jr. said at the conclusion of a hearing yesterday that he would rule within 24 hours on a motion by the city for summary judgment in the case. If he rules against the city and O'Malley, the case would likely go to trial, exposing a bitter fight over the actions that led to Clark's dismissal.
NEWS
July 28, 1993
Court hearing rescheduledA Howard Circuit Court hearing on the Long Reach village election controversy has been postponed until tomorrow at 2 p.m.The hearing was originally scheduled for yesterday, but was postponed because Judge Cornelius F. Sybert Jr. was on vacation.The Long Reach Community Association and the Columbia Association have entered motions asking for a summary judgment in the lawsuit filed by former Columbia Council member Gail Bailey. Summary judgment is a procedure for quickly disposing of a case and avoiding a trial if it is determined that facts are not in dispute.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Baltimore city officials argued in court Friday for a quick resolution to its legal battle with the would-be developer of a downtown slots parlor, a case that threatens to further delay casino gambling in Maryland's largest city. City attorneys asked Baltimore City Circuit Judge John P. Miller to issue a summary judgment in the lawsuit filed by Baltimore City Entertainment Group, which contends that the city unlawfully terminated a land deal for the casino after the state declined to give the developer a slots license . BCEG, headed by Canadian developer Michael Moldenhauer, sued the city for breach of contract in July, seeking $100 million in damages.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Even if he is able to overcome the legal obstacles to his proposed Baltimore casino, Canadian developer Michael Moldenhauer is unlikely to be granted a license to operate slot machines in the city, according to court documents filed this week. Moldenhauer, who was the only applicant for the Baltimore slots license, appears to lack "the requisite financial stability, integrity and responsibility," according to the state slots commission, which recently reopened a background check on the Toronto homebuilder.
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