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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2005
A 21-year-old Navy photographer from Ellicott City survived the crash of a helicopter ferrying help for tsunami victims from the USS Abraham Lincoln to the Banda Aceh airport in Indonesia yesterday without serious injury. Petty Officer 3rd Class Jacob J. Kirk, whose photography and compassion for tsunami victims were featured in an article in The Sun yesterday, called his father early yesterday after the accident on Sumatra that injured two servicemen. "He just feels really banged up," John Kirk said.
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By Los Angeles Times | March 7, 2007
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Thousands of terrified Indonesians were searching for shelter yesterday after an earthquake killed at least 70 people and damaged or destroyed hundreds of buildings on Sumatra island. The 6.3-magnitude quake was centered 30 miles northeast of Padang in West Sumatra and struck at 10:49 a.m. yesterday local time, the U.S. Geological Survey said. Hundreds were injured, most by falling rubble. Many survivors escaped more serious injury because they fled buildings when the tremors struck and were outside two hours later when a powerful aftershock toppled scores of buildings, said Gusmal, a district official in Solok, the hardest-hit area.
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NEWS
October 1, 1997
GLOOM, AND SMOKE, shroud the economic miracle of Southeast Asia as bank losses and currency runs in Thailand spread to Indonesia and Malaysia. The construction frenzy, typified by competitive skyscraper heights, is petering out. People cannot see the buildings of Kuala Lumpur and Singapore through the thickening haze. Worst of all, they have trouble breathing.A confluence of three disasters -- two human and one natural -- is producing the world's worst smog since London in 1952, after which coal burning was banished there.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono and Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2005
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Residents of the remote Indonesian island of Nias pulled hundreds of bodies from the rubble yesterday in the wake of a powerful earthquake Monday off the coast of Sumatra that flattened buildings, collapsed bridges and damaged the airport runway. The earthquake death toll has risen steadily. Officials put it at 330 yesterday. But Sumatra Gov. Rizal Nurdin estimated early today that the figure had risen to 1,000. Government officials have said it could climb as high as 2,000.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 7, 2007
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Thousands of terrified Indonesians were searching for shelter yesterday after an earthquake killed at least 70 people and damaged or destroyed hundreds of buildings on Sumatra island. The 6.3-magnitude quake was centered 30 miles northeast of Padang in West Sumatra and struck at 10:49 a.m. yesterday local time, the U.S. Geological Survey said. Hundreds were injured, most by falling rubble. Many survivors escaped more serious injury because they fled buildings when the tremors struck and were outside two hours later when a powerful aftershock toppled scores of buildings, said Gusmal, a district official in Solok, the hardest-hit area.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
In the hours after last month's Sumatra earthquake, an astonishing report began to circulate: So potent was the undersea jolt that it disrupted the planet's rotation, causing the day to shorten ever so slightly. But did it? "The answer to this question is a definite yes," write NASA scientists Richard Gross and Benjamin Chao in an article published Tuesday in Eos, the weekly newspaper of the American Geophysical Union. After plugging measurements of the Sumatra quake into a computer model, the scientists calculated that the quake sped up the planet's rotation - thus shortening the length of the day - by as much as 2.68 millionths of a second.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono and Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2005
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Residents of the remote Indonesian island of Nias pulled hundreds of bodies from the rubble yesterday in the wake of a powerful earthquake Monday off the coast of Sumatra that flattened buildings, collapsed bridges and damaged the airport runway. The earthquake death toll has risen steadily. Officials put it at 330 yesterday. But Sumatra Gov. Rizal Nurdin estimated early today that the figure had risen to 1,000. Government officials have said it could climb as high as 2,000.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2004
LHOKSEUMAWE, Indonesia -- Mulyana, a 24-year-old housewife, had just sat down to a wedding party Sunday morning when the tsunami struck. She ran and held onto a coconut tree. Still, the water dragged her far out to sea. "I was alone in the middle of the ocean," Mulyana said yesterday from her hospital bed in this town on the northeastern coast of Aceh province, the area of Indonesia hit hardest by the disaster. "I was afraid of being pulled all the way to India." Mulyana, who cannot swim, said she clung to a coconut tree floating nearby.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 2, 2005
EXPENSIVE AS IT is, I will now buy its whole-bean coffee because Starbucks pledges $2 in South Asian disaster relief for every pound of Sumatra, Decaf Sumatra and Aged Sumatra purchased in its company-operated stores this month. I am in the market for new jeans so I will consider Levi Strauss, which uses Indonesian workers to stitch denim, if the company gives up a chunk of change for the millions left homeless there by the natural terrorism of earthquake and tsunami. Someone gave me a fleece pullover from Columbia Sportswear for Christmas.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Karen Kaplan and Richard C. Paddock and Karen Kaplan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - An 8.7 magnitude earthquake struck off the northern coast of Sumatra late yesterday, killing hundreds of people, authorities said, and triggering panic and mass evacuations in coastal areas leveled by the tsunami in December. Several countries issued tsunami warnings but withdrew them after no giant waves appeared. Experts said the undersea quake triggered waves 4 to 12 inches high in different parts of the Indian Ocean. The island of Nias off the west coast of Sumatra was reported to have suffered the greatest damage from the temblor, with numerous buildings destroyed.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Karen Kaplan and Richard C. Paddock and Karen Kaplan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - An 8.7 magnitude earthquake struck off the northern coast of Sumatra late yesterday, killing hundreds of people, authorities said, and triggering panic and mass evacuations in coastal areas leveled by the tsunami in December. Several countries issued tsunami warnings but withdrew them after no giant waves appeared. Experts said the undersea quake triggered waves 4 to 12 inches high in different parts of the Indian Ocean. The island of Nias off the west coast of Sumatra was reported to have suffered the greatest damage from the temblor, with numerous buildings destroyed.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 16, 2005
RUKOH, Indonesia - For the first time in his life, Hamdani, the leader of this village in northern Sumatra, cannot stand to be alone. The 45-year-old shopkeeper who once relished his solitude is terrified of sitting in a room by himself. Shutting the door to bathe each evening fills him with dread. It's difficult to fall asleep. His eyes are rheumy, his face is drawn and his hands rub his forehead nervously, as if trying to erase the thoughts inside. Left alone, his thoughts inevitably turn to the dead, he says.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
The Sumatran earthquake that triggered the devastating South Asian tsunami on Dec. 26 was so powerful its seismic waves coursed through the Earth's crust and sent water levels surging in a monitoring well in southwestern Virginia, 10,000 miles away. State and federal geologists said water in the 450-foot limestone well in Christiansburg began oscillating, surging upward at least 2 feet, and down at least 3 over a half-hour period as the seismic waves passed. It was five hours before the water returned to its former levels and calmed down.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2005
A 21-year-old Navy photographer from Ellicott City survived the crash of a helicopter ferrying help for tsunami victims from the USS Abraham Lincoln to the Banda Aceh airport in Indonesia yesterday without serious injury. Petty Officer 3rd Class Jacob J. Kirk, whose photography and compassion for tsunami victims were featured in an article in The Sun yesterday, called his father early yesterday after the accident on Sumatra that injured two servicemen. "He just feels really banged up," John Kirk said.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
In the hours after last month's Sumatra earthquake, an astonishing report began to circulate: So potent was the undersea jolt that it disrupted the planet's rotation, causing the day to shorten ever so slightly. But did it? "The answer to this question is a definite yes," write NASA scientists Richard Gross and Benjamin Chao in an article published Tuesday in Eos, the weekly newspaper of the American Geophysical Union. After plugging measurements of the Sumatra quake into a computer model, the scientists calculated that the quake sped up the planet's rotation - thus shortening the length of the day - by as much as 2.68 millionths of a second.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 2, 2005
EXPENSIVE AS IT is, I will now buy its whole-bean coffee because Starbucks pledges $2 in South Asian disaster relief for every pound of Sumatra, Decaf Sumatra and Aged Sumatra purchased in its company-operated stores this month. I am in the market for new jeans so I will consider Levi Strauss, which uses Indonesian workers to stitch denim, if the company gives up a chunk of change for the millions left homeless there by the natural terrorism of earthquake and tsunami. Someone gave me a fleece pullover from Columbia Sportswear for Christmas.
NEWS
By Edward A. Gargan and Edward A. Gargan,NEWSDAY | July 14, 2001
BANGSRI, Indonesia - The last of central Java's great teakwood forests ends up in places like this, a place filled with the whine of buzz saws and the burr of electric sanders, a place like Abdul Jambari's garden-furniture workshop. "This is for export," Jambari says, stroking the finely polished arm of an auburn-grained folding chair. "It's the best teak, what we call class A." And because his order book is full, a month or two from now, for about $100, Jambari's chair will sit on a patio or deck somewhere in the United States or Europe.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 16, 2005
RUKOH, Indonesia - For the first time in his life, Hamdani, the leader of this village in northern Sumatra, cannot stand to be alone. The 45-year-old shopkeeper who once relished his solitude is terrified of sitting in a room by himself. Shutting the door to bathe each evening fills him with dread. It's difficult to fall asleep. His eyes are rheumy, his face is drawn and his hands rub his forehead nervously, as if trying to erase the thoughts inside. Left alone, his thoughts inevitably turn to the dead, he says.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2004
LHOKSEUMAWE, Indonesia -- Mulyana, a 24-year-old housewife, had just sat down to a wedding party Sunday morning when the tsunami struck. She ran and held onto a coconut tree. Still, the water dragged her far out to sea. "I was alone in the middle of the ocean," Mulyana said yesterday from her hospital bed in this town on the northeastern coast of Aceh province, the area of Indonesia hit hardest by the disaster. "I was afraid of being pulled all the way to India." Mulyana, who cannot swim, said she clung to a coconut tree floating nearby.
NEWS
By Edward A. Gargan and Edward A. Gargan,NEWSDAY | July 14, 2001
BANGSRI, Indonesia - The last of central Java's great teakwood forests ends up in places like this, a place filled with the whine of buzz saws and the burr of electric sanders, a place like Abdul Jambari's garden-furniture workshop. "This is for export," Jambari says, stroking the finely polished arm of an auburn-grained folding chair. "It's the best teak, what we call class A." And because his order book is full, a month or two from now, for about $100, Jambari's chair will sit on a patio or deck somewhere in the United States or Europe.
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