Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSulfur
IN THE NEWS

Sulfur

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 23, 2002
Q. My 12-year-old son will be going back to camp this summer. He came home last year with chigger bites all over his legs. A year later, you can still see where the bites were. Is there something he can put on his legs to deter these nasty pests? A friend recommended sulfur, but the pharmacist said this was not a good idea because sulfur can burn. Can you help? A. Chiggers are the bane of campers, gardeners and berry pickers. These critters are also known as red bugs or harvest mites.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Garonzik | July 11, 2014
While Maryland is well positioned for complying with Environmental Protection Agency's preliminary carbon regulations, mandating a 30 percent nationwide reduction in CO2 emissions from power plants by 2030, those proposed regulations by themselves will do nothing for the dismal air quality of the Baltimore metro area because we're already largely in compliance. Instead of the federal CO2 standard, we must focus on the state level to eliminate the toxic pollutants nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
A tentative ruling by a Texas environmental commission would force Crown Central Petroleum Corp. to install a $300,000 device to help stop sulfur emissions at one of its refineries in Texas -- an order readily accepted by the company but deemed insufficient by environmental groups and health officials who say Crown should install a more effective unit that would cost more than $20 million.The move comes nearly a year after the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission fined Crown just over $1 million -- the largest air pollution fine ever issued by Texas -- for continued violations between 1993 and 1998 that included excessive hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide emissions at its Pasadena refinery.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
The Port of Baltimore sits on the cusp of major advancements. This year marks the highly anticipated completion of an eight-year project to widen the Panama Canal, which is expected to bring a major boost in cargo shipments to Baltimore, one of only two East Coast ports capable of handling the larger ships that will soon be passing through. After visiting the canal last year, Vice President Joe Biden announced that the project could double the 100,000 jobs already supported by Baltimore's port.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
Chemical-maker W. R. Grace & Co. said yesterday that it has purchased a Chicago hydroprocessing enterprise that will put the Columbia-based company in the business of aiding in the removal of sulfur from gasoline. Last month, the Environmental Protection Agency said it will require gasoline to have a significantly smaller amount of sulfur by 2005. "It expands our product offering in hydroprocessing and positions us to compete in the light-oil area, including removing sulfur from gasoline, and strategically that is why it's valuable," Paul J. Norris, Grace's chairman, president and chief executive officer said yesterday.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 26, 1992
An accident that sent six Lehigh Portland Cement employees to Carroll County General Hospital on Nov. 5 was caused by trace amounts of sulfur compounds in a waste oil truck that was left open at the Union Bridge plant, company officials said yesterday.The company released that finding after conducting what officials described as a preliminary investigation into the accident.The report said the substances -- hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans -- are known to cause dizziness, breathing and eye problems and nausea, the symptoms shown by the employees that morning.
NEWS
April 18, 1999
CLEANER gasoline means cleaner-running cars. That's the environmental message major oil companies have advertised for years. So why do refiners object to low-sulfur fuel that would cut air pollution the equivalent of removing 50 million cars from the road?Primarily, the cost. Billions of dollars would be needed to convert refineries to remove the natural sulfur from petroleum. The cost of a gallon of gasoline could rise by 10 cents to 20 cents, the industry warns.The auto industry wants the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to require a nationwide gasoline with 90 percent less sulfur than the current 340 parts per million average.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2004
A $100,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency will help buy ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel for 165 transit buses in East Baltimore, officials said yesterday. Wedged between several disassembled MTA buses in a Highlandtown bus barn, representatives from several state, national and local agencies said the one-year project is intended to reduce diesel exhaust emissions, which exacerbate the city's smog and can cause respiratory and health problems. The EPA money given to the Maryland Department of the Environment will subsidize the difference in cost between regular diesel and the ultra-low-sulfur fuel, which is 8 cents to 12 cents more a gallon, said Robert L. Smith, administrator for the Maryland Transit Administration.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 9, 1999
Over the last two decades, countries in northern Europe and North America have been enacting regulations to reduce smokestack emissions of sulfur in an effort to curb acid rain and its harmful effect on the environment.In what researchers say is the first comprehensive look at the effect of those reductions on rivers and lakes, an international team of scientists reports finding a nearly universal decrease on both continents in the levels of sulfates -- the major acidifying pollutant deposited by acid rain in surface water.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | October 11, 2006
Most of the diesel fuel being produced nationwide is now a low-sulfur variety that will sharply cut pollution by trucks and buses - a change that federal officials are calling the biggest clean-fuel advance since unleaded gasoline. EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson said in a teleconference yesterday that ultra-low sulfur diesel now makes up about 90 percent of the output of U.S. refiners - exceeding the 80 percent standard the industry was required to meet by Sunday. The rule, proposed by the Clinton administration and implemented by the Bush administration, is the culmination of an environmental "Dump Dirty Diesel" campaign that began in New York more than a decade ago with ads on transit buses.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
It isn't hard to recognize an example of false economy in the average household budget. The vegetable gardener who spends $500 on supplies to produce $12 in produce, the inexpensive home repair that falls apart in a month or the avid shopper who saves $5 online but pays an extra $20 in shipping and handling. Yet for some reason many of us are blind to the false economy of providing gasoline at the cheapest price possible regardless of its impact on our lives and society. To put it bluntly, humans have been subsidizing the cost of gas by accepting - without direct charge - the air pollution gas-burning vehicles generate.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Just before midnight Wednesday, three words brought a stream of emergency crews and hazardous materials units to a wooded corner of Cecil County just north of Interstate 95: liquid sulfuric acid. A train operated by CSX Corp. derailed about 11:45 p.m., and initial reports said two cars contained the highly corrosive and environmentally dangerous substance. Luckily, officials said, the acid didn't leak, even though the cars containing it were off-kilter. "They were either sideways or just off the rail, but none are on their side," said CSX spokesman Bob Sullivan of the nine cars determined to have slipped off the tracks.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2011
In a sweeping move aimed at curbing long-distance air pollution that afflicts the health of 240 million Americans — including Marylanders — the Environmental Protection Agency is ordering power plants across much of the eastern United States to sharply curtail emissions. The rule, announced Thursday, gives coal-fired plants in Maryland and 26 other states until 2014 to make steep reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, pollutants that contribute to serious health problems such as asthma, bronchitis and heart attacks.
NEWS
January 1, 2009
On December 30, 2008, JACOB PETER (Jack) MEYER, beloved husband of Eleanor B. Meyer (nee Carter); loving father of Patrick Horine-Meyer Relatives and friends may call at the family-owned Ambrose Funeral Home, Inc 1328 Sulfur Spring Road ( Arbutus) on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. where a funeral service will be held Saturday at 9:30 A.M. Interment following at Loudon Park Cemetery. www.ambrosefuneralhomes.com
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | December 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's stunning loss in a constitutional referendum Sunday has dealt a severe and possibly fatal blow to his ambitions to spread his political ideology and succeed Fidel Castro as the leader of Latin America's anti-American left, analysts and U.S. officials said yesterday. Few analysts were willing to bet that Chavez won't recover and try again to strengthen his grip on power in Venezuela. But the rejection of his proposed constitutional changes hurt Chavez because it came on top of a string of international gaffes and missteps that have made him look erratic and even buffoonish.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | October 11, 2006
Most of the diesel fuel being produced nationwide is now a low-sulfur variety that will sharply cut pollution by trucks and buses - a change that federal officials are calling the biggest clean-fuel advance since unleaded gasoline. EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson said in a teleconference yesterday that ultra-low sulfur diesel now makes up about 90 percent of the output of U.S. refiners - exceeding the 80 percent standard the industry was required to meet by Sunday. The rule, proposed by the Clinton administration and implemented by the Bush administration, is the culmination of an environmental "Dump Dirty Diesel" campaign that began in New York more than a decade ago with ads on transit buses.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | October 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After directly sampling the high-altitude exhaust from a Concorde supersonic jet for the first time, a research team has warned that a new fleet of such planes could pose more danger to the Earth's protective ozone layer than previously believed.The measurements were made last October by a civilian version of the U-2 spy plane that trailed a chartered Air France Concorde flying off the coast of New Zealand at 53,000 feet.The exhaust of the supersonic transport contained more microscopic particles -- a mix of soot, water and sulfuric acid -- than had been expected, according to a report published in Friday's issue of the journal Science.
NEWS
By Michael Wines and Michael Wines,New York Times News Service | January 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It may not be immediately apparent to anyone who has not recently taken a close look at the pumps at filling stations, but since Jan. 1, the government has required that diesel fuel be sold in three colors.The colors are part of a new effort by two federal agencies and Congress to clean the air and collect fuel taxes.For the government, it is simpler. For everyone else, it is far more confusing.Consider: Highway vehicles must burn expensive clear diesel, except for government cars and trucks, local buses and vehicles owned by disparate groups like aircraft museums, nonprofit schools and the American Red Cross.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 29, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The devil, you say? His ears must be burning more than usual these days. Ol' Beelzebub's name is getting called into political service, from the loonier corners of the left to the most self-righteous regions of the right. "Yesterday, the devil came here," Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez said in a speech delivered in Spanish before the United Nations. El diablo of whom he spoke was President Bush. "Right here," he said, drawing laughter by blessing himself with the sign of the cross, folding his hands as if in prayer and glancing heavenward.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | January 12, 2006
At the suggestion of the power industry, the Ehrlich administration is proposing to exempt about half of Maryland's coal-fired power plants from some of the governor's new rules on air-pollution control, according to a draft of the regulations released yesterday. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. held a news conference in November to announce that he would soon be issuing the Maryland Clean Power Rule, which he said would be "the most sweeping, far-reaching clean air rule ever promulgated in Maryland."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.