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NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | September 25, 1994
Passers-by stopped to stare at the Ford pickup truck pulling into the parking lot of the Oakland Mills Meeting House in Columbia early Friday morning.Within minutes, several bearded young men pulled out a five-step staircase that would give visitors a better look at the tiny wooden hut sitting in the back.At that moment, the wobbly, 8-by-4-foot structure gained the distinction of being Howard County's first and only sukkah mobile.Observant Jews erect sukkahs in observance of the holiday of Sukkot, also called the Feast of Tabernacles.
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FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 9, 2005
The supremacy of faith and the danger of bargaining with God, unless you're sure you're willing to pay the price, are graphically presented in Ushpizin, a modern-day fable set in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Jerusalem. The movie, written by and starring Israeli actor Shuli Rand, immerses its audience in a world few will have experienced, with results both life-affirming and surprisingly comedic. And for those who think they understand that ultra-Orthodox world ... well, they might be in for a surprise.
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NEWS
October 8, 1992
Kent E. Schiner, a Pikesville insurance underwriter serving his second two-year term as president of B'nai B'rith International, plans to spend part of the Sukkot holiday, which begins Sunday, with the Jewish community of Cuba.Sukkot, a joyous nine-day festival, comes four days after Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.In Cuba, Mr. Schiner will be the guest of the B'nai B'rith Maimonides Lodge, which was founded in 1943. He will be the first B'nai B'rith president to visit Cuba on behalf of the 149-year-old international Jewish organization.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE STAFF | April 4, 2003
In the two years since Emma Young's husband died, the retired assembly worker has been unable to maintain the Jessup home they purchased 20 years ago. But the two-story house will undergo a facelift April 27. That's when volunteers from Columbia Jewish Congregation will join hands, tools and elbow grease in Rebuilding Together with Sukkot in April. Congregants will replace a window, repair the sidewalk, turn a closet into a food pantry and modify the bathroom with handrails. "I think it's wonderful," Young said.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE STAFF | April 4, 2003
In the two years since Emma Young's husband died, the retired assembly worker has been unable to maintain the Jessup home they purchased 20 years ago. But the two-story house will undergo a facelift April 27. That's when volunteers from Columbia Jewish Congregation will join hands, tools and elbow grease in Rebuilding Together with Sukkot in April. Congregants will replace a window, repair the sidewalk, turn a closet into a food pantry and modify the bathroom with handrails. "I think it's wonderful," Young said.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 15, 1997
JERUSALEM -- In years past, the symbols of the Jewish festival Sukkot arrived prepackaged at Marga Hirsch's synagogue in Pennsylvania. And like her fellow congregants, Hirsch simply picked up her order.Not this year.Hirsch, a graduate student on a 12-month fellowship in Jerusalem, spent a sunny afternoon recently wandering from market stall to market stall to buy the four traditional plants associated with the weeklong holiday that begins tonight.The palm frond, myrtle, willow branches and citron are as emblematic of the holiday as the sukkah, the temporary structures built by religious Jews in back yards and on balconies from Baltimore to Bnei Barak, the ultra-Orthodox community outside Tel Aviv.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 20, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Before dawn this morning, Dr. Zvi Abramowitz will gather up his prayer shawl and close the door of his home in Jerusalem's walled Old City behind him. He will walk through the stone warrens of the Jewish quarter, heading for that place Jews call the Kotel, the Western Wall, which is all that remains of the Second Temple and is the holiest site in Judaism. In his pocket will be a small prayer book. In his hand, a palm frond known as a lulav. Along the way he will buy a willow branch, one of four ritual symbols of the Jewish harvest holiday of Sukkot.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1995
For even the most pious Jew, there must be release from the rigorous demands of Judaism.Release is found in wild, joyous dancing that will fill synagogues across Baltimore and the world tonight and tomorrow with the celebration of Simhat Torah, the holiday commemorating the end of the annual cycle of scripture readings from Genesis to Deuteronomy."
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 9, 2005
The supremacy of faith and the danger of bargaining with God, unless you're sure you're willing to pay the price, are graphically presented in Ushpizin, a modern-day fable set in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Jerusalem. The movie, written by and starring Israeli actor Shuli Rand, immerses its audience in a world few will have experienced, with results both life-affirming and surprisingly comedic. And for those who think they understand that ultra-Orthodox world ... well, they might be in for a surprise.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 1997
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM in Arnold observes Yom Kippur, Day of Atonement, tomorrow evening with services at 6: 30 and 9: 30. Services Saturday are at 10 a.m. at St. Andrew by the Bay Roman Catholic Church in Annapolis; and at the temple at 2 p.m. (children's service), 3: 30 p.m., 5: 30 p.m. (Yizkor service) and 6: 15 p.m. (Neilah service).The festival of Sukkot, Feast of Tabernacles, goes back to a time when Jews worshiped at the temple at Jerusalem. The Hebrew word means "booth," a temporary shelter Jews used when wandering in the desert.
NEWS
By Jessica Bacharach and Jessica Bacharach,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2001
Temple Isaiah began in 1970, when the Jewish population of Howard County was almost nonexistent. The small congregation was composed of a few young Jews who first met in people's homes. "These Jews were the early pioneers," explains Mark Panoff, the head rabbi of the Columbia synagogue for the past 14 years. Temple Isaiah has come a long way from its early days of services conducted in the homes of its few congregants. Today, it is one of the largest Reform synagogues in the area, with 460 families, 500 children and more than 50 bar and bat mitzvahs a year.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 20, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Before dawn this morning, Dr. Zvi Abramowitz will gather up his prayer shawl and close the door of his home in Jerusalem's walled Old City behind him. He will walk through the stone warrens of the Jewish quarter, heading for that place Jews call the Kotel, the Western Wall, which is all that remains of the Second Temple and is the holiest site in Judaism. In his pocket will be a small prayer book. In his hand, a palm frond known as a lulav. Along the way he will buy a willow branch, one of four ritual symbols of the Jewish harvest holiday of Sukkot.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 15, 1997
JERUSALEM -- In years past, the symbols of the Jewish festival Sukkot arrived prepackaged at Marga Hirsch's synagogue in Pennsylvania. And like her fellow congregants, Hirsch simply picked up her order.Not this year.Hirsch, a graduate student on a 12-month fellowship in Jerusalem, spent a sunny afternoon recently wandering from market stall to market stall to buy the four traditional plants associated with the weeklong holiday that begins tonight.The palm frond, myrtle, willow branches and citron are as emblematic of the holiday as the sukkah, the temporary structures built by religious Jews in back yards and on balconies from Baltimore to Bnei Barak, the ultra-Orthodox community outside Tel Aviv.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 1997
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM in Arnold observes Yom Kippur, Day of Atonement, tomorrow evening with services at 6: 30 and 9: 30. Services Saturday are at 10 a.m. at St. Andrew by the Bay Roman Catholic Church in Annapolis; and at the temple at 2 p.m. (children's service), 3: 30 p.m., 5: 30 p.m. (Yizkor service) and 6: 15 p.m. (Neilah service).The festival of Sukkot, Feast of Tabernacles, goes back to a time when Jews worshiped at the temple at Jerusalem. The Hebrew word means "booth," a temporary shelter Jews used when wandering in the desert.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1995
For even the most pious Jew, there must be release from the rigorous demands of Judaism.Release is found in wild, joyous dancing that will fill synagogues across Baltimore and the world tonight and tomorrow with the celebration of Simhat Torah, the holiday commemorating the end of the annual cycle of scripture readings from Genesis to Deuteronomy."
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | September 25, 1994
Passers-by stopped to stare at the Ford pickup truck pulling into the parking lot of the Oakland Mills Meeting House in Columbia early Friday morning.Within minutes, several bearded young men pulled out a five-step staircase that would give visitors a better look at the tiny wooden hut sitting in the back.At that moment, the wobbly, 8-by-4-foot structure gained the distinction of being Howard County's first and only sukkah mobile.Observant Jews erect sukkahs in observance of the holiday of Sukkot, also called the Feast of Tabernacles.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1990
The simple wooden structure made of wood, plastic and pine seems out of place in this Columbia neighborhood brimming with manicured lawns and foreign cars. Yet for one family, that is precisely why it is there.The small shelter constructed on the deck of the Columbia home was built and decorated by Yisroel and Nava Susskind and two of their four children in observance of the Jewish holiday Sukkot, which begins 18 minutes before sunset this evening.The eight-day holiday, also called the Feast of Tabernacles, commemorates the exodus from Egypt when the ancient Hebrews wandered through the desert before reaching Israel.
NEWS
By Jessica Bacharach and Jessica Bacharach,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2001
Temple Isaiah began in 1970, when the Jewish population of Howard County was almost nonexistent. The small congregation was composed of a few young Jews who first met in people's homes. "These Jews were the early pioneers," explains Mark Panoff, the head rabbi of the Columbia synagogue for the past 14 years. Temple Isaiah has come a long way from its early days of services conducted in the homes of its few congregants. Today, it is one of the largest Reform synagogues in the area, with 460 families, 500 children and more than 50 bar and bat mitzvahs a year.
NEWS
October 8, 1992
Kent E. Schiner, a Pikesville insurance underwriter serving his second two-year term as president of B'nai B'rith International, plans to spend part of the Sukkot holiday, which begins Sunday, with the Jewish community of Cuba.Sukkot, a joyous nine-day festival, comes four days after Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.In Cuba, Mr. Schiner will be the guest of the B'nai B'rith Maimonides Lodge, which was founded in 1943. He will be the first B'nai B'rith president to visit Cuba on behalf of the 149-year-old international Jewish organization.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1990
The simple wooden structure made of wood, plastic and pine seems out of place in this Columbia neighborhood brimming with manicured lawns and foreign cars. Yet for one family, that is precisely why it is there.The small shelter constructed on the deck of the Columbia home was built and decorated by Yisroel and Nava Susskind and two of their four children in observance of the Jewish holiday Sukkot, which begins 18 minutes before sunset this evening.The eight-day holiday, also called the Feast of Tabernacles, commemorates the exodus from Egypt when the ancient Hebrews wandered through the desert before reaching Israel.
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