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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
The High Holy Day rigors of fasting and repentance are over. Now comes the time for celebration.At sundown tomorrow, Jews begin the observance of Sukkot, a weeklong harvest festival. Over the past few days, observant Jews have been building sukkahs, outdoor huts made of wood or canvas that symbolize the tents used by the Israelites during their 40 years of wandering in the desert.Part of the fun is in building the sukkah, said a group of Towson University students who erected a sukkah yesterday on a grassy patch between the library and the Jewish Student Center.
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NEWS
October 6, 2006
Hydrogeologist set to speak at synagogue Beth Shalom Congregation will sponsor a talk by hydrogeologist Stephen J. Cohen of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. He will discuss "Clean Energy and the Environment: The Nuclear Power Alternative." The talk will be held during evening services today at the synagogue, 8070 Harriet Tubman Lane, Columbia. Admission is free. Information: 410-531-5115. The congregation will hold "Bonim," a Sukkot event with games and food for children in kindergarten to second grade from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sunday.
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NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | September 25, 1994
Passers-by stopped to stare at the Ford pickup truck pulling into the parking lot of the Oakland Mills Meeting House in Columbia early Friday morning.Within minutes, several bearded young men pulled out a five-step staircase that would give visitors a better look at the tiny wooden hut sitting in the back.At that moment, the wobbly, 8-by-4-foot structure gained the distinction of being Howard County's first and only sukkah mobile.Observant Jews erect sukkahs in observance of the holiday of Sukkot, also called the Feast of Tabernacles.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2002
Randi Engel is looking forward to an evening of spirited dancing tomorrow night. But the 15-year-old isn't heading off to a mosh pit. She will join fellow congregants of Beth Shalom Synagogue in Columbia as they dance with Torah scrolls while singing Jewish songs in observance of the festive Jewish holiday of Simchat Torah. "I love Simchat Torah," said Randi, a 10th-grader at Atholton High School in Columbia. "It's a great time to celebrate and have fun. It's a great revival after Yom Kippur, which is so serious.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2002
Randi Engel is looking forward to an evening of spirited dancing tomorrow night. But the 15-year-old isn't heading off to a mosh pit. She will join fellow congregants of Beth Shalom Synagogue in Columbia as they dance with Torah scrolls while singing Jewish songs in observance of the festive Jewish holiday of Simchat Torah. "I love Simchat Torah," said Randi, a 10th-grader at Atholton High School in Columbia. "It's a great time to celebrate and have fun. It's a great revival after Yom Kippur, which is so serious.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1990
The simple wooden structure made of wood, plastic and pine seems out of place in this Columbia neighborhood brimming with manicured lawns and foreign cars. Yet for one family, that is precisely why it is there.The small shelter constructed on the deck of the Columbia home was built and decorated by Yisroel and Nava Susskind and two of their four children in observance of the Jewish holiday Sukkot, which begins 18 minutes before sunset this evening.The eight-day holiday, also called the Feast of Tabernacles, commemorates the exodus from Egypt when the ancient Hebrews wandered through the desert before reaching Israel.
NEWS
October 6, 2006
Hydrogeologist set to speak at synagogue Beth Shalom Congregation will sponsor a talk by hydrogeologist Stephen J. Cohen of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. He will discuss "Clean Energy and the Environment: The Nuclear Power Alternative." The talk will be held during evening services today at the synagogue, 8070 Harriet Tubman Lane, Columbia. Admission is free. Information: 410-531-5115. The congregation will hold "Bonim," a Sukkot event with games and food for children in kindergarten to second grade from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 15, 1997
JERUSALEM -- In years past, the symbols of the Jewish festival Sukkot arrived prepackaged at Marga Hirsch's synagogue in Pennsylvania. And like her fellow congregants, Hirsch simply picked up her order.Not this year.Hirsch, a graduate student on a 12-month fellowship in Jerusalem, spent a sunny afternoon recently wandering from market stall to market stall to buy the four traditional plants associated with the weeklong holiday that begins tonight.The palm frond, myrtle, willow branches and citron are as emblematic of the holiday as the sukkah, the temporary structures built by religious Jews in back yards and on balconies from Baltimore to Bnei Barak, the ultra-Orthodox community outside Tel Aviv.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2001
Two of the most important gifts Judaism has to offer the world - its music and its adherence to the commandments known as "mitzvahs" - will be on display at 7 Saturday evening when Howard County's Jewish congregations join to sponsor "Oy Vey! A Children's Klezmer Concert" at Oakland Mills Interfaith Center. The "mitzvah" dimension to this evening of Jewish singing, dancing, storytelling and humor geared to youngsters and their parents is that proceeds will be used to sponsor the building of a home for a local low-income family.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 20, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Before dawn this morning, Dr. Zvi Abramowitz will gather up his prayer shawl and close the door of his home in Jerusalem's walled Old City behind him. He will walk through the stone warrens of the Jewish quarter, heading for that place Jews call the Kotel, the Western Wall, which is all that remains of the Second Temple and is the holiest site in Judaism. In his pocket will be a small prayer book. In his hand, a palm frond known as a lulav. Along the way he will buy a willow branch, one of four ritual symbols of the Jewish harvest holiday of Sukkot.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
The High Holy Day rigors of fasting and repentance are over. Now comes the time for celebration.At sundown tomorrow, Jews begin the observance of Sukkot, a weeklong harvest festival. Over the past few days, observant Jews have been building sukkahs, outdoor huts made of wood or canvas that symbolize the tents used by the Israelites during their 40 years of wandering in the desert.Part of the fun is in building the sukkah, said a group of Towson University students who erected a sukkah yesterday on a grassy patch between the library and the Jewish Student Center.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | September 25, 1994
Passers-by stopped to stare at the Ford pickup truck pulling into the parking lot of the Oakland Mills Meeting House in Columbia early Friday morning.Within minutes, several bearded young men pulled out a five-step staircase that would give visitors a better look at the tiny wooden hut sitting in the back.At that moment, the wobbly, 8-by-4-foot structure gained the distinction of being Howard County's first and only sukkah mobile.Observant Jews erect sukkahs in observance of the holiday of Sukkot, also called the Feast of Tabernacles.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1990
The simple wooden structure made of wood, plastic and pine seems out of place in this Columbia neighborhood brimming with manicured lawns and foreign cars. Yet for one family, that is precisely why it is there.The small shelter constructed on the deck of the Columbia home was built and decorated by Yisroel and Nava Susskind and two of their four children in observance of the Jewish holiday Sukkot, which begins 18 minutes before sunset this evening.The eight-day holiday, also called the Feast of Tabernacles, commemorates the exodus from Egypt when the ancient Hebrews wandered through the desert before reaching Israel.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2001
Two of the most important gifts Judaism has to offer the world - its music and its adherence to the commandments known as "mitzvahs" - will be on display at 7 Saturday evening when Howard County's Jewish congregations join to sponsor "Oy Vey! A Children's Klezmer Concert" at Oakland Mills Interfaith Center. The "mitzvah" dimension to this evening of Jewish singing, dancing, storytelling and humor geared to youngsters and their parents is that proceeds will be used to sponsor the building of a home for a local low-income family.
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