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Sujata Massey

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By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 1, 2014
Glancing out the windows of Sujata Massey's house on an early spring day, you could be on a quiet street anywhere, in Japan, or India, or Minneapolis, Minn. Massey shares a bond with all of those places, but her heart and home are in the Roland Park area. She lives near Roland Avenue, in Tuxedo Park. An Indian tablecloth graces Massey's dining room table, where the award-wining author and former reporter - best known for her series of mystery novels set in Japan featuring sleuth Rei Shimura - does most of her writing.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 1, 2014
Glancing out the windows of Sujata Massey's house on an early spring day, you could be on a quiet street anywhere, in Japan, or India, or Minneapolis, Minn. Massey shares a bond with all of those places, but her heart and home are in the Roland Park area. She lives near Roland Avenue, in Tuxedo Park. An Indian tablecloth graces Massey's dining room table, where the award-wining author and former reporter - best known for her series of mystery novels set in Japan featuring sleuth Rei Shimura - does most of her writing.
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NEWS
By [ Frederick N. Rasmussen] | April 26, 2008
Her five Rei Shimura mystery novels have brought her plenty of awards, including a highly esteemed Agatha for best first novel - The Salaryman's Wife - in 1998; an Edgar nomination for best paperback original for Zen Attitude, published in 1998; a 2000 Macavity Award for best novel, The Flower Master; and an Agatha nomination for best novel for The Bride's Kimono in 2000. "Shimura Trouble just came out, and it'll probably be the last book in the Rei Shimura series," Massey said in an interview from her home the other day. "It's time to do something else and put the character on a honeymoon."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Sujata Massey opened the door of her refrigerator and pulled out a curry made from pink potatoes and zucchini. It was the best way she could think of to demonstrate what's going on inside her head when she sits down to write a novel. "I'm an odd person," says Massey, who recently returned with her family to Baltimore after a six-year hiatus. "This is the kind of thing I make, and my kids are not excited by the look of it. If I make a hamburger, I make it with Indian spices. There will never be a tuna casserole in this house.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Sujata Massey opened the door of her refrigerator and pulled out a curry made from pink potatoes and zucchini. It was the best way she could think of to demonstrate what's going on inside her head when she sits down to write a novel. "I'm an odd person," says Massey, who recently returned with her family to Baltimore after a six-year hiatus. "This is the kind of thing I make, and my kids are not excited by the look of it. If I make a hamburger, I make it with Indian spices. There will never be a tuna casserole in this house.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 20, 1997
At first glance, it looks as if Sujata Massey shamelessly spurned the time-tested writing advice to "write what you know."First, the British-born Baltimorean set her new mystery, "The Salaryman's Wife" (HarperCollins, $5.99), in modern-day Japan. Second, Massey, whose mother is German and father is Indian, created a heroine who struggles with her Japanese-American cultural identity. And, in the ultimate affront to the traditional method, she wrote in the first person."No, I didn't really follow that advice," Massey admits, sipping tea in her fastidiously decorated Roland Park home during a rare break from a cross-country promotional tour of her first, warmly received book.
NEWS
October 9, 2005
There's something wonderfully mysterious about Baltimore. Edgar Allan Poe, America's first great mystery writer, lived, wrote and died here, and this richly diverse city on the bay has provided personalities and backdrops for dozens of great reads by masters of the genre. Dashiell Hammett based two of his early novels on his experience working at the Baltimore branch of the Pinkerton Detective Agency. Raymond Chandler mentions Baltimore in Farewell, My Lovely, and James M. Cain, who worked at the Baltimore News American, featured Baltimore in The Enchanted Isle.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
Daniel Mark Epstein, biographer of Nat King Cole, will be one of about 60 authors appearing Sunday at Book Bash '99, an annual fund-raiser for Baltimore County literacy programs.Book Bash '99 takes place from 6 p.m. to 9: 30 p.m. at the Bibelot bookstore in Festival at Woodholme, 1819 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville. Tickets cost $40 per person in advance, $50 at the door.Diane Rehm, public radio talk-show host and author of "Finding My Voice," is honorary author chairwoman of the event. She will appear at a $150-per-person reception from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
December 11, 2005
Fiction Scorpion's Gate By Richard A. Clarke Typhoon Lover By Sujata Massey Missing Mom By Joyce Carol Oates Third Girl from the Left By Martha Southgate Everyone Worth Knowing By Lauren Weisberger Nonfiction Lennon Revealed By Larry Kane Cat People By Michael Korda and Margaret Korda 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus By Charles Mann I Can't Believe She Did That: Why Women Betray Other Women At Work By Nan Mooney ...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | October 3, 1999
How better to brighten up a party than with a guest famous for his utter lack of joy! Ah, but this was a party to thank supporters of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, on opening night of the Baltimore Book Festival. And the guest of honor? The Baltimore-connected writer Edgar Allan Poe, as portrayed by actor David Keltz."They don't make melancholics like they used to in the 19th century," sighed Dr. Sarah Begus, as she listened to Keltz recite Poe's "The Raven."Among those sharing the good cheer in the Literary Salon tent at the Mount Vernon book festival site were Carla Hayden, library director; Ronald Owens, president of Friends of the Enoch Pratt Free Library; Bob Hillman and Peggy Heller, library board trustees; Primus St. John, poet; Fred L. Miller and Sujata Massey, authors; and Charles Longo and Willis White, vice presidents of SlingShot Publishing Co.
NEWS
By [ Frederick N. Rasmussen] | April 26, 2008
Her five Rei Shimura mystery novels have brought her plenty of awards, including a highly esteemed Agatha for best first novel - The Salaryman's Wife - in 1998; an Edgar nomination for best paperback original for Zen Attitude, published in 1998; a 2000 Macavity Award for best novel, The Flower Master; and an Agatha nomination for best novel for The Bride's Kimono in 2000. "Shimura Trouble just came out, and it'll probably be the last book in the Rei Shimura series," Massey said in an interview from her home the other day. "It's time to do something else and put the character on a honeymoon."
NEWS
October 9, 2005
There's something wonderfully mysterious about Baltimore. Edgar Allan Poe, America's first great mystery writer, lived, wrote and died here, and this richly diverse city on the bay has provided personalities and backdrops for dozens of great reads by masters of the genre. Dashiell Hammett based two of his early novels on his experience working at the Baltimore branch of the Pinkerton Detective Agency. Raymond Chandler mentions Baltimore in Farewell, My Lovely, and James M. Cain, who worked at the Baltimore News American, featured Baltimore in The Enchanted Isle.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
Daniel Mark Epstein, biographer of Nat King Cole, will be one of about 60 authors appearing Sunday at Book Bash '99, an annual fund-raiser for Baltimore County literacy programs.Book Bash '99 takes place from 6 p.m. to 9: 30 p.m. at the Bibelot bookstore in Festival at Woodholme, 1819 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville. Tickets cost $40 per person in advance, $50 at the door.Diane Rehm, public radio talk-show host and author of "Finding My Voice," is honorary author chairwoman of the event. She will appear at a $150-per-person reception from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 20, 1997
At first glance, it looks as if Sujata Massey shamelessly spurned the time-tested writing advice to "write what you know."First, the British-born Baltimorean set her new mystery, "The Salaryman's Wife" (HarperCollins, $5.99), in modern-day Japan. Second, Massey, whose mother is German and father is Indian, created a heroine who struggles with her Japanese-American cultural identity. And, in the ultimate affront to the traditional method, she wrote in the first person."No, I didn't really follow that advice," Massey admits, sipping tea in her fastidiously decorated Roland Park home during a rare break from a cross-country promotional tour of her first, warmly received book.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Sun Staff | June 13, 1999
Guidebooks and tourists come, tourists and guidebooks go. "Wish You Were Here: A Guide to Baltimore City for Natives and Newcomers" by Carolyn Males, Carol Barbier Rolnick and Pam Makowski Goresh (Woodholme, 448 pages, $19.95 paperbound) stands out as the most recent such book, probably the most comprehensive one, and the first to include online addresses.The authors begin by going overboard on flapdoodle (hon, 'dos, Bawlmer, Elvis worship) but rescue themselves with solid treatment of geographic areas, architecture and the arts, museums and parks, hotels and restaurants, monuments, sports, shopping.
NEWS
November 30, 2000
An interview with Angie Engles, facilitator of a book club at the Savage branch of the Howard County Library. The club is called the Savage Mystery Book Club and periodically changes its name when the group focuses on different genres. What book are members reading this month? Last time we met, we decided we would read Agatha Christie books and Dorothy Sayers books and sort of get a feel for the older mysteries. ... At first, we were going to have everyone read the same book, and then we decided to read books from both authors.
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