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Suitcase

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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 31, 2003
Heavy vehicle and pedestrian traffic was disrupted for two hours last night while the city police bomb squad investigated a suitcase left unattended across the street from the Pratt Street Pavilion at Harborplace. Arriving at the scene at 6:47 p.m., police blocked eastbound Pratt Street from Light to Gay streets, Commerce Street between Pratt and Lombard streets and westbound Lombard Street between Commerce and South streets. Police blasted the suitcase and knocked it over with a remote-controlled high-pressure water gun. When officers opened it, they found clothing and traffic resumed at 8:45 p.m., police said.
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FEATURES
By Sarai Brinker | May 23, 2013
What it is: A travel app designed for kids ages 3 to 7 that allows them to pack their bags and enjoy the travel season by exploring worldwide destinations like London, Cairo and Moscow.  After kids learn how to pack a suitcase according to weather, they drive to the airport, navigate security lines and board their flight.   Little travelers claim their luggage and are off to see the world! After a busy day of sightseeing, kids can snap a few photos and create a postcard to send back home.  Why it's fun: The perfect app for a kid to play leading up to a summer vacation, Frequent Flyer builds anticipation of traveling while giving parents an opportunity to prepare and a context in which to share their own travel experiences.
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NEWS
By Shirley Dempsey-Kahn | September 11, 2011
I am at southside mall just before the big day in December of 2001, my rust-spotted RAV-4 parked in front of Goodwill, when my favorite holiday music starts up over the loudspeaker. "Greensleeves" always brings to mind the first time I heard it. Bagpipes and drums had awakened me in my hotel on my very first trip to London. When I looked out the window, below me marched a small parade of men wearing kilts, and I later learned the tune they played was a somber "Greensleeves. " Today it reminds me that, besides new Christmas tree lights, I could use luggage for my upcoming sixth trip to London, this time with the College of Notre Dame of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Su | July 21, 2012
From her push-up bra to her square-cut bangs, the woman in the photograph is somehow both squeaky-clean and, in a sexual sense, a little bit dirty. Her undergarments are crafted from black lace. She's wearing 7-inch platform heels and an utterly unforced smile. She's bending forward, but not too far. Her arms are held behind her at an awkward angle as if her wrists are bound. When Claire Sharp of Severna Park fished the slide from the pocket of an old suitcase last year, she immediately recognized the subject as Bettie Page, the 1950s pinup queen.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2000
An unattended suitcase in an off-street garage a block from Harborplace caused a bomb scare that disrupted traffic for about two hours last night as crowds were leaving the popular Waterfront Festival. According to Maj. John McEntee, the night commander of the Police Department, an employee of the Central Parking System of Md. Inc. garage in the IBM Tower in the 100 block of E. Lombard St. discovered the suitcase about 7 p.m. near an exit on the garage's ground level and called police.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | February 27, 1991
"The Suitcase," by Sergei Dovlatov, translated by Antonina W. Bouis, 128 pages, Grove Weidenfeld, $16.95.SERGEI DOVLATOV died at the end of the summer in Coney Island Hospital, an emigre far from the Russian homeland he continued to find precious if still impossible to live in.Dovlatov was only 48, and he had lived about 11 years in the United States. He might have appreciated the irony of dying in a place best known for its broken-down amusement park.His books often depict the Soviet Union with spare, sometimes almost surreal, absurdity as a kind of decrepit theme park.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 7, 2001
SEVERAL YEARS ago, in Judge Joe Pine's courtroom in Baltimore, the mother of a defendant looked at me and said, "If you write something bad about my son, I'm gonna throw a suitcase at you." Ever since, I've had this vision of attorneys walking up to people and hitting them with large pieces of luggage. That's my vision of this litigious society of ours - guys in suits whacking people with the full line of American Tourister products. When I see Peter Angelos, the busiest man in the litigation biz, I see a guy with more baggage than Cher and Charo combined, heaving jumbo suitcases at big corporations and chucking smaller, matching pieces at anyone else who might get in his way. He's good at it, maybe the best.
NEWS
By Jane Hansen and Jane Hansen,Cox News Service | December 25, 1991
ATLANTA -- When she was 8, she became a mother. Not in the physical sense, but a mother nevertheless.Her own mother -- a dear woman who used to keep them dressed in such pretty dresses, their curly hair in bows -- died suddenly that year of pneumonia. They were living in Charlotte, N.C., in that big old Victorian house, during the Depression, before penicillin. She remembers the doctor and his black bag and how sorry he was when he told them there was nothing he could do."It was a loving home," Betty Glover, 63, now of Rockdale County, Ga., was saying.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 29, 2010
A Baltimore man returning from Ghana was arrested at Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport Tuesday after nearly seven pounds of heroin was found hidden in his suitcase, according to U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. Suleiman Zakaria, 26, was randomly selected by a Customs and Border Patrol officer for a secondary examination while he was in the passenger arrivals area at about 6 p.m. Officers found 3.08 kilograms of heroin in a false bottom of his suitcase, worth about $430,000 wholesale, according to customs.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2000
An empty suitcase left at the faculty entrance to Northeast High School yesterday led to a three-hour delay in the opening of school, fire officials said. It was the second day of scares for the Pasadena school, but fire officials say they don't think the incidents are related. According to Lt. Bob Rose, a spokesman for Anne Arundel County EMS/Fire/Rescue, school Principal George Kispert discovered the suitcase shortly before 5: 20 a.m. when he arrived early to complete paperwork. Kispert became suspicious and called 911, Rose said.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 11, 2011
It was the song "Greensleeves" that drew Shirley Dempsey-Kahn into the Goodwill store that December morning. It reminded her of her first trip to London as a child, with her father, a naval officer, and her mother. She would be returning in January, and she thought to buy herself an extra piece of luggage. The kind with a handle and wheels and an expandable compartment. The kind of suitcase flight attendants favor. In a jumble of luggage in the corner of the store, she found exactly what she wanted: a nearly new Travel Pro carry-on bag. It cost only $8, plus tax. She couldn't believe her luck.
NEWS
By Shirley Dempsey-Kahn | September 11, 2011
I am at southside mall just before the big day in December of 2001, my rust-spotted RAV-4 parked in front of Goodwill, when my favorite holiday music starts up over the loudspeaker. "Greensleeves" always brings to mind the first time I heard it. Bagpipes and drums had awakened me in my hotel on my very first trip to London. When I looked out the window, below me marched a small parade of men wearing kilts, and I later learned the tune they played was a somber "Greensleeves. " Today it reminds me that, besides new Christmas tree lights, I could use luggage for my upcoming sixth trip to London, this time with the College of Notre Dame of Maryland.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 29, 2010
A Baltimore man returning from Ghana was arrested at Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport Tuesday after nearly seven pounds of heroin was found hidden in his suitcase, according to U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. Suleiman Zakaria, 26, was randomly selected by a Customs and Border Patrol officer for a secondary examination while he was in the passenger arrivals area at about 6 p.m. Officers found 3.08 kilograms of heroin in a false bottom of his suitcase, worth about $430,000 wholesale, according to customs.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green | December 25, 2009
W hen my sister, Betsy, and I were in the first and second grade, our mother took up skiing. This was an odd pastime for someone in Illinois to adopt, but she was quite passionate for a time about her newfound pursuit. And as fate would have it, our aunt, uncle and cousins were living in Salt Lake City, and mom decided we should visit them for Christmas so that she could teach us how to ski, too. There was just one minor hurdle: How to get the Christmas presents to Aunt Carolyn's house without two inquisitive young kids catching on?
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,sumathi.reddy@baltsun.com | August 30, 2008
There was no casket, no bouquets of flowers, no pews filled with people. Instead, there was a small wooden toybox and pictures of a 15-month-old baby drinking his bottle and playing, and the dozen mourners who came to say good-bye to him. "I fought hard to save this little boy's life ... but nobody would help me," said Seeta Khadan-Newton, Javon Thompson's grandmother. "So I was fighting a fight by myself which ended with me losing my grandson and my daughter where she is now." Javon's mother, Ria Ramkissoon, 21, is among five people Baltimore homicide detectives have charged with first-degree murder in connection with the toddler's death.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | August 14, 2008
Two women were ordered held without bail yesterday on charges that they participated in the starvation death of a child whom they considered a "demon" because he wouldn't say amen after his meals, according to police charging documents. Standing side by side in court, Queen Antoinette, 40, and Trevia Williams, 21, refused to be represented by city public defenders during their bail review at the Central Booking and Intake Center. Police say Antoinette was the leader of a cult and that Williams was one of her followers; each is charged with first-degree murder.
NEWS
By Sarah Park and Sarah Park,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2004
SAN MIGUEL, El Salvador - On Thursdays, she brings out the knife. The dull steak blade is part of an unimpressive array of tools - nose, fingers, plastic tub, afternoon sun - that Angela Maritza Carballo uses to detect contraband in packages being sent to the United States from this smallest of Central American countries. She is the sole inspector for Umana Express, one of hundreds of mom-and-pop courier services that have linked families in El Salvador and the United States for more than 20 years.
TRAVEL
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 11, 1999
Thank heaven for little wheels.These days, you'll find them on everything from backpacks to duffel bags, as well as those ubiquitous boxy suitcases no well-equipped business traveler seems to leave the office without. Increasingly, traveling families -- including mine -- swear by them too."With the kids holding on to their own luggage, I've got a hand free to hold on to a kid," explains Brian Beihl, a New Hampshire dad of three who checked out more than a dozen kinds for his new Family on Board travel products catalog.
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