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By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
For the first four weeks of the season, Orioles hitters vowed that despite their poor offensive numbers, things would get better soon. They had better, or those hitters might not be around for much longer. Fed up with an offense that has scored two or fewer runs in 12 of 28 games, Andy MacPhail put the team's hitters on notice Wednesday in a rare public display of frustration for the Orioles' president of baseball operations. "While you can give them some allowance for the quality of pitching that we've faced, our patience isn't inexhaustible," MacPhail said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun before the Orioles' 7-5 loss to the New York Yankees on Wednesday.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | May 18, 2010
It was the easiest test of the year and the Orioles still flunked it. I'm talking about the eight-game homestand that ended Tuesday night at Oriole Park, and I'm not talking about the easiest test so far. I'm talking about the easiest span of the entire 2010 season, if you base that judgment on the performance and standing of the Seattle Mariners, Cleveland Indians and Kansas City Royals when they arrived in Baltimore. Things only get more difficult from here. The Orioles head to Texas to face the first-place Rangers, then to Washington to face the surprising Nationals, a team they never expected to be looking up at in this, supposedly a turn-the-corner season in the Andy MacPhail rebuilding program.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2000
The Crofton teen-ager awaiting trial on charges of helping his girlfriend kill herself in a failed suicide pact was granted a little more freedom yesterday. Judge Pamela L. North agreed to let the 16-year-old, who is on home detention, leave his mother's house from 9 a.m. to noon to job-hunt. "He is doing an excellent job, abiding by all the rules," said Kimber Davis, one of the youth's two public defenders. The youth is the first person accused of violating Maryland's ban on assisted suicide.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | May 9, 2010
The walls might seem to be crumbling at the Warehouse, but Andy MacPhail, the Orioles' president of baseball operations, remains steadfast — or is that stubborn? — in his belief that his long-term rebuilding plan is still on track. That probably sounds a little nutty if you've been watching the team trip over itself the past five weeks. The Orioles got off to the second-worst start in club history. They entered Saturday's doubleheader in Minnesota with the worst record in the major leagues.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2000
Two psychiatrists say the Crofton teen-ager accused of helping his girlfriend kill herself in the fall in a suicide pact gone awry was too mentally ill to be held responsible. The finding does not end the first test case of Maryland's ban on assisted suicide, but it is likely to form the basis of the equivalent of an insanity defense that could result in the youth's being placed under the supervision of state mental health officials while not giving him a juvenile court record. Assistant State's Attorney Michael O. Bergeson confirmed yesterday that each side's psychiatrist said the 16-year-old boy was too depressed to keep his behavior within the law. Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Pamela L. North must decide whether to accept the psychiatrists' findings.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2000
In the first application of the state's assisted suicide ban, an Anne Arundel County judge found yesterday that the Crofton teen-ager who had a suicide pact with his girlfriend violated that law, but suffered from such severe depression that he is not responsible for his actions. Circuit Judge Pamela L. North rejected defense arguments that the law, sparked by Dr. Jack Kevorkian, applied only to health care workers helping terminally ill patients die. She said that if the General Assembly wanted to cover only assisted suicides of terminally ill people, legislators could have narrowed the law this spring.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
A Woodlawn couple found shot to death in woods behind their home yesterday morning apparently made a suicide pact, leaving notes for their son and police describing what they planned to do, Baltimore County police said."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
School records of 15-year-old Jennifer Garvey, who committed suicide in October, may play a role in the trial of her boyfriend -- a Crofton teen-ager who is the first person charged under Maryland's law banning assisted suicide. Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Pamela L. North agreed at a court hearing yesterday to a private review of Garvey's Arundel Senior High School records. Her decision came after defense lawyers said school records may contain information on Garvey's feelings about suicide, her relationship with her boyfriend and whether -- as prosecutors say -- her school performance suffered after she began dating him in May. The records, which the judge will review with attorneys from both sides, may help the boy's lawyers plan a defense for the juvenile trial scheduled to begin May 25. Assistant Public Defender William Davis said in court he is looking into an insanity plea -- the boy has a history of psychiatric hospitalizations -- and whether Garvey, not his client, had taken the lead in what has been called a suicide pact that ended with her death in the Crofton storm drains known to teen-agers as the Underworld.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2000
A Baltimore delegate annoyed with the move by Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee to charge a 16-year-old Crofton youth with violating Maryland's ban on assisted suicide is hoping to change the law to prevent prosecutors from using it against other juveniles. On Tuesday, the teen-ager, who police believe entered into a suicide pact with his girlfriend, became the first person charged with breaking the new law. The measure took effect Oct. 1. That has worried some delegates and senators, who had Michigan doctor Jack Kevorkian in mind a year ago when they made assisted suicide a felony punishable by up to a year in jail.
NEWS
March 11, 2000
MARYLAND legislators may have been spooked by the haunting demonstration of Jack Kevorkian's death machine on "60 Minutes" when they passed a law banning assisted suicides. But reckless doctors weren't the only people lawmakers wanted to stop. The state law clearly seeks to prevent anyone from aiding a suicide. So the Anne Arundel County State's Attorney's office was right to bring Maryland's first assisted suicide charge against a teen-ager who is accused of taking an active part in the death of his 15-year-old girlfriend.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
As talented as Brian Matusz is, the Orioles fully expected the 23-year-old rookie pitcher would have days like Sunday, when he was knocked around by the Minnesota Twins for six earned runs in 3 2/3 innings. They also carried the reasonable expectation that the lineup would hit enough to keep the Orioles in most games and take pressure off some of their young starters. In the Orioles' 6-0 loss to the Twins before a sellout crowd of 38,641 on Sunday at Target Field, Matusz authored his first poor outing of 2010.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
For the first four weeks of the season, Orioles hitters vowed that despite their poor offensive numbers, things would get better soon. They had better, or those hitters might not be around for much longer. Fed up with an offense that has scored two or fewer runs in 12 of 28 games, Andy MacPhail put the team's hitters on notice Wednesday in a rare public display of frustration for the Orioles' president of baseball operations. "While you can give them some allowance for the quality of pitching that we've faced, our patience isn't inexhaustible," MacPhail said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun before the Orioles' 7-5 loss to the New York Yankees on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2006
ELKTON -- Ed Hoffman says he stood over the bed of his sleeping wife for a half-hour, a loaded shotgun in his hands, watching in the pre-dawn darkness as she tossed and turned in her nightgown. When she nestled into just the right position, he put the barrel against her head and pulled the trigger, killing her instantly. Then it was his turn to complete what he says was a murder-suicide pact between him and his wife of 44 years. But first he had to take care of some details. He went to his computer and composed and sent an e-mail to 70 friends and relatives, a matter-of-fact recounting of their loving marriage and desire to take charge of their own deaths.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2000
In the first application of the state's assisted suicide ban, an Anne Arundel County judge found yesterday that the Crofton teen-ager who had a suicide pact with his girlfriend violated that law, but suffered from such severe depression that he is not responsible for his actions. Circuit Judge Pamela L. North rejected defense arguments that the law, sparked by Dr. Jack Kevorkian, applied only to health care workers helping terminally ill patients die. She said that if the General Assembly wanted to cover only assisted suicides of terminally ill people, legislators could have narrowed the law this spring.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2000
The Crofton teen-ager awaiting trial on charges of helping his girlfriend kill herself in a failed suicide pact was granted a little more freedom yesterday. Judge Pamela L. North agreed to let the 16-year-old, who is on home detention, leave his mother's house from 9 a.m. to noon to job-hunt. "He is doing an excellent job, abiding by all the rules," said Kimber Davis, one of the youth's two public defenders. The youth is the first person accused of violating Maryland's ban on assisted suicide.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2000
Two psychiatrists say the Crofton teen-ager accused of helping his girlfriend kill herself in the fall in a suicide pact gone awry was too mentally ill to be held responsible. The finding does not end the first test case of Maryland's ban on assisted suicide, but it is likely to form the basis of the equivalent of an insanity defense that could result in the youth's being placed under the supervision of state mental health officials while not giving him a juvenile court record. Assistant State's Attorney Michael O. Bergeson confirmed yesterday that each side's psychiatrist said the 16-year-old boy was too depressed to keep his behavior within the law. Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Pamela L. North must decide whether to accept the psychiatrists' findings.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | May 18, 2010
It was the easiest test of the year and the Orioles still flunked it. I'm talking about the eight-game homestand that ended Tuesday night at Oriole Park, and I'm not talking about the easiest test so far. I'm talking about the easiest span of the entire 2010 season, if you base that judgment on the performance and standing of the Seattle Mariners, Cleveland Indians and Kansas City Royals when they arrived in Baltimore. Things only get more difficult from here. The Orioles head to Texas to face the first-place Rangers, then to Washington to face the surprising Nationals, a team they never expected to be looking up at in this, supposedly a turn-the-corner season in the Andy MacPhail rebuilding program.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
School records of 15-year-old Jennifer Garvey, who committed suicide in October, may play a role in the trial of her boyfriend -- a Crofton teen-ager who is the first person charged under Maryland's law banning assisted suicide. Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Pamela L. North agreed at a court hearing yesterday to a private review of Garvey's Arundel Senior High School records. Her decision came after defense lawyers said school records may contain information on Garvey's feelings about suicide, her relationship with her boyfriend and whether -- as prosecutors say -- her school performance suffered after she began dating him in May. The records, which the judge will review with attorneys from both sides, may help the boy's lawyers plan a defense for the juvenile trial scheduled to begin May 25. Assistant Public Defender William Davis said in court he is looking into an insanity plea -- the boy has a history of psychiatric hospitalizations -- and whether Garvey, not his client, had taken the lead in what has been called a suicide pact that ended with her death in the Crofton storm drains known to local teen-agers as the Underworld.
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