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NEWS
January 27, 1998
IN JAKARTA, the dictator Suharto announced his candidacy for a seventh five-year term as Indonesia's president. In response, the sunken rupiah has plunged even deeper into worthlessness.Worse, the 76-year-old and ailing Suharto hinted his vice president and heir would be his longtime pal and author of grandiose industrial projects bankrupting the country, B. J. Habibie, the technology minister. At least it was not one of the six Suharto children whose corrupt grip on the economy prevents a level playing field for real entrepreneurs.
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NEWS
December 12, 2008
ALI ALATAS, 76 Indonesian diplomat was once considered for top U.N. post Former Indonesian Foreign Minister Ali Alatas, who had the delicate task of representing Indonesia during an often-brutal dictatorship and was once considered for the top job at the United Nations, died yesterday in Singapore, a week after suffering a stroke. Mr. Alatas was the country's highest-ranking diplomat from 1988 until 1999 - the year after longtime President Suharto was swept from power after a wave of pro-democracy street protests.
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NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Paul Watson and Richard C. Paddock and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 28, 2008
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Former President Suharto, an army general who rose to power in Indonesia with the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of people and ruled for 32 years during an era of rapid economic growth and extraordinary graft, died yesterday in Indonesia. He was 86. Suharto's unyielding opposition to communism won him the backing of the United States during the height of the Cold War, although he was one of the most brutal and corrupt rulers of that era. He governed the world's fourth-most-populous nation with a combination of paternalism and ruthlessness from 1965 until he was ousted in spring 1998.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Paul Watson and Richard C. Paddock and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 28, 2008
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Former President Suharto, an army general who rose to power in Indonesia with the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of people and ruled for 32 years during an era of rapid economic growth and extraordinary graft, died yesterday in Indonesia. He was 86. Suharto's unyielding opposition to communism won him the backing of the United States during the height of the Cold War, although he was one of the most brutal and corrupt rulers of that era. He governed the world's fourth-most-populous nation with a combination of paternalism and ruthlessness from 1965 until he was ousted in spring 1998.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - The youngest son of former President Suharto admitted yesterday that he was guilty of corruption, but he was allowed to leave the court after he asked for clemency to avoid serving an 18-month prison sentence imposed by the Supreme Court. In a meeting with prosecutors, Hutomo Mandala Putra, who is known as Tommy Suharto, formally requested a presidential pardon. His lawyers said that though the request amounted to an admission of corruption in a $10.8 million land deal by Tommy Suharto - the first Suharto family member to be convicted of graft - it was intended to prevent him from going to jail.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Indonesia's new president, B. J. Habibie, consolidated his hold over the country's politics yesterday when one of his close advisers won a hotly contested vote to lead the country's dominant political party.It was the first electoral test for the man who was almost nobody's choice to succeed President Suharto six weeks ago, and who many people believed would hold office only fleetingly.Habibie's control over the party greatly improves his ability to set the political agenda and remain in office at least until the end of next year, when he has scheduled a parliamentary vote for a new president.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 24, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Just a few days ago this nation of more than 200 million was bracing for the worst: mass bloodshed in the capital and perhaps civil war.Expatriates who had not already fled Jakarta poured into the airport desperate to escape. Hotels warned guests, some of whom had left their homes because of earlier violence, to draw their curtains and stay away from the windows.Opponents of then-President Suharto planned a demonstration of up to 1 million people on Wednesday, just days after rioting had left more than 500 dead.
NEWS
By JIM MANN | May 11, 1997
TWO AGING DICTATORS began this year seeking to hold on to power in huge, mineral-rich Third World countries. One of them is thriving; the other is, at this writing, about to fall. Why do the two men seem headed for such different fates?The dictators are Presidents Suharto of Indonesia and Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire.Both have ruled their nations for more than three decades, since the days of Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency. The two are, in their own ways, almost as much a legacy of America in the mid-1960s as the Beach Boys or the civil rights movement.
NEWS
March 1, 1998
THE MEETING of the People's Consultative Assembly of Indonesia, starting today, is the last chance President Suharto has to commit his nation to reforms to end its economic crisis, meet International Monetary Fund requirements, diminish his family's stranglehold on the national wealth and promise the people a better future. There is scant hope that he will.When the assembly winds up March 11, "electing" the military dictator to a sixth term as president and presumably his anti-reform crony, B. Jusuf Habibie, as vice president, it may be too late.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 5, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Trying to send a strong message that widespread violence and corruption will no longer be tolerated in Indonesia, President Abdurrahman Wahid said yesterday that he would not to pardon the convicted son of former dictator Suharto and ordered the arrest of the country's most notorious militia leader. But Wahid's actions could lead to further unrest. Violence and public disorder have erupted during past government efforts to bring the Suharto family and the militias to justice, underscoring the difficulty of this impoverished country's struggle to forge a democracy after decades of authoritarian rule.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | May 9, 2002
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Spend a few days in Indonesia and you'll find many people asking you a question you weren't prepared for: Is America's war on terrorism going to become a war against democracy? As Indonesians see it, for decades after World War II, America sided with dictators, like their own President Suharto, because of its war on communism. With the fall of the Berlin Wall, America began to press more vigorously for democracy and human rights in countries like Indonesia, as the United States shifted from containing communism to enlarging the sphere of democratic states.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 5, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Trying to send a strong message that widespread violence and corruption will no longer be tolerated in Indonesia, President Abdurrahman Wahid said yesterday that he would not to pardon the convicted son of former dictator Suharto and ordered the arrest of the country's most notorious militia leader. But Wahid's actions could lead to further unrest. Violence and public disorder have erupted during past government efforts to bring the Suharto family and the militias to justice, underscoring the difficulty of this impoverished country's struggle to forge a democracy after decades of authoritarian rule.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - The youngest son of former President Suharto admitted yesterday that he was guilty of corruption, but he was allowed to leave the court after he asked for clemency to avoid serving an 18-month prison sentence imposed by the Supreme Court. In a meeting with prosecutors, Hutomo Mandala Putra, who is known as Tommy Suharto, formally requested a presidential pardon. His lawyers said that though the request amounted to an admission of corruption in a $10.8 million land deal by Tommy Suharto - the first Suharto family member to be convicted of graft - it was intended to prevent him from going to jail.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 1, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - By calling in sick on the first day of his corruption trial, Indonesia's former leader, Suharto, has put up another hurdle to this country's tortuous effort to come to terms with its past. Government prosecutors said yesterday that they would procede with their case against Suharto on charges that he siphoned about $590 million in state funds through several charitable foundations under his control when he was president. But with the trial adjourned until Sept. 14 - and then only to hear testimony from doctors who declared Suharto unfit to attend the opening session yesterday - it is far from clear that the 79-year-old former president will ever stand in the dock.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 31, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Now and then the old man swings a golf club or feeds his exotic birds while he awaits trial on corruption charges for plundering the nation's wealth. He wakes up to the crow of his favorite rooster and a pet parrot that squawks: "Good morning, Father President." The parrot is an echo of the good days of former President Suharto's New Order regime, which came to a bloody end in 1998. During Suharto's heyday, advisers told him only what they figured he would like to hear.
NEWS
August 6, 2000
THE AGED, deposed national leader may or may not remember enough to help his defense, if the charges against him actually get to court. But former President of Indohesia Suharto is facing trial for skimming $570 million from the state in 32 years of misrule. Whether, at age 79, after two strokes, he is actually going through the indignity, or will escape on health grounds, doesn't matter much. He is not getting back in power. The establishment will move against the assets of his children and cronies, to the extent that it can find them.
NEWS
August 6, 2000
THE AGED, deposed national leader may or may not remember enough to help his defense, if the charges against him actually get to court. But former President of Indohesia Suharto is facing trial for skimming $570 million from the state in 32 years of misrule. Whether, at age 79, after two strokes, he is actually going through the indignity, or will escape on health grounds, doesn't matter much. He is not getting back in power. The establishment will move against the assets of his children and cronies, to the extent that it can find them.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 8, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- As Indonesia's President Suharto prepares for his reanointment this week at age 76, the question is whether he can stop the country from unraveling and keep his job.The fourth most populous nation in the world and potentially the greatest casualty in Asia's financial meltdown, Indonesia faces its worst economic crisis in three decades -- one that could end Suharto's rule after 32 years and rattle financial markets from Tokyo to New...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Dealing another blow to Indonesia's embattled former leader, Suharto, a Jakarta court ruled yesterday that Time magazine did not libel him in an article that claimed Suharto and his family amassed a $15 billion fortune during his three decades in power. "According to the evidence, it is clear that the article was not fabricated, but was based on facts," said the ruling by a three-judge panel. The judges also said they respected the magazine's refusal to reveal its confidential sources.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 30, 2000
BEIJING - Bowing to public anger and street violence, Indonesia's attorney general put former President Suharto under house arrest yesterday and vowed to charge him with embezzlement in the next two months. "This is to ensure the questioning continues," said Yusyar Yahya, a spokesman for Attorney General Marzuki Darusman. The government has ordered Suharto not to leave his home in a lush, wealthy neighborhood in downtown Jakarta. For the retired five-star general who ruled Indonesia for more than three decades, yesterday's announcement marked further humiliation as he fights charges of embezzlement of millions of dollars from charitable foundations controlled by his family.
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