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NEWS
October 6, 2004
On Tuesday, October 5, 2004, ALLEN JOSEPH SUGARMAN, beloved husband of Sonya Sugarman (nee Shuman), beloved father of Mark, Noah and Michael Sugarman, all of Baltimore, MD and the late Terry Sugarman. Devoted brother of Robert and Rabbi Marvin Sugarman, Pearl Falk and the late Norma Gurey, loving grandfather of Terry Sugarman. Services at SOL LEVINSON BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Wednesday, October 6, at 10 A.M. Interment Chofetz Chaim-Adas Bnai Israel Cemetery, Rosedale.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Less than a year into his tenure as editor in chief at Baltimore's Style Magazine, Joe Sugarman is out. Publisher Craig Burke confirmed Sugarman's departure, but declined further comment. Burke replied to questions about it with an email announcing the promotion of Jessica Bizik to editor in chief and Jeni Mann to associate publisher. Here's part of that email: We have promoted Jeni Mann, our current Custom Media Director, to Associate Publisher of Baltimore Style.  Jeni is a veteran of the Baltimore media industry for 28 years  Before joining our team, she served as executive editor for Corridor Inc., deputy managing editor for the Baltimore Examiner, and creative services manager for The Baltimore Sun's special sections.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 9, 2000
Surprise! The Democratic ticket is more sanctimonius than the GOP's, which is more fun than the Democratics'. Sorry. There's just no way to vote for Bush and Lieberman. Vote for George! A chicken fajita in every microwave. Q. What exactly is a Verizon? A. That's what the union wants to find out. Cheer Up. The Sugarman sculpture is back in front of the Garmatz courthouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Joe Sugarman has been promoted from senior editor to editor-in-chief at Baltimore's Style magazine. He succeeds Brian Lawrence who was fired in September after 10 years in that job. "Yes, the rumors are true," Sugarman wrote in an email response seeking confirmation of his appointment. "The November food issue will be my first as editor-in-chief at Style. That issue comes out early next week, with a great cover photo of Hilary Phelps looking like she just stepped out of the set of 'Mad Men.'" Sugarman added that he and his team will "likely roll out some changes to the magazine by the second quarter of 2013, including a redesign by the new creative director, Kim Van Dyke.
NEWS
July 10, 1995
The controversy over the George Sugarman sculpture at the entrance to the Garmatz Federal Courthouse in downtown Baltimore is one of the city's longer-running disputes. The federal judges say the brightly colored metal structure detracts from the dignity of the court. Yet many people think the piece is a welcome relief from the relentless grayness of the federal building.Then came a bombshell from U.S. Marshal Scott A. Sewell, who called Mr. Sugarman's work a security risk in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City bombing and asked that it be removed.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | June 4, 2008
If you belong to a gym, you know that people do all sorts of annoying things during workouts. They sweat all over the exercise equipment and don't bother to wipe it off. They park themselves on a machine and yak for 20 minutes with friends, preventing others from using it. They sing loudly - and badly - when listening to their iPods on treadmills and stair-steppers. And they grunt and groan and shout things like "Yeah, baby!" to psych themselves and show everyone what a killer workout they're having.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
An increase in single-family home sales -- with an assist from condominiums -- has helped ease the sagging Baltimore metropolitan new-homes market, according to third-quarter statistics released by Housing Data Reports.According to the Washington-based firm, which tracks and analyzes new-home sales, there was a 4.6 percent rise in sales during July, August and September and a 7.7 percent gain in condominium sales over the same period in 1996.Yet even with these gains, HDR said year-to-date overall sales for single-family detached homes, townhouses and condominiums remained 7.2 percent off the pace, with 5,953 units sold compared with 6,421 in 1996.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Contributing writer | February 3, 1991
It wasn't your typical class reunion.No one discussed careers, talked about divorces, or reminisced about the good old days.In fact, the alumni didn't talk at all, preferring instead to coo, bat their brand-new eyelashes and squeeze any nearby fingers that came into grasping range.At the three-month childbirthing class reunion at Harford Community College, being seen with your parents wasn't even considered uncool. In fact, it was de rigueur.For the parents who took the class to learn about the stages and techniques of giving birth, the class reunion was the culmination of seven weeks ofhard work and, in most cases, several hours of hard labor.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 21, 1995
The proposal to remove the George Sugarman sculpture from the plaza outside the U. S. District Courthouse downtown is as wrong-headed as was the attempt to prevent it from being put there in the first place, two decades ago.The sculpture belongs where it is. Removing it would set a terrible example. And the reason given -- that it's a security risk -- is a far-fetched fear, being used as an excuse to get rid of a piece of art that some people simply don't like -- just as it was back then.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1995
For 18 years it has embellished the U.S. District Courthouse in Baltimore -- a $98,000, red, blue, green and yellow welded-aluminum thorn in the side of the judges who pass by it every day."Ridiculous," says one of the George Sugarman sculpture. "A monstrosity," mutters another. Unattractive, yes. But more important, it lacks dignity -- that's the consensus.Yet for all their power and influence, Maryland's federal judges were never able to persuade anybody to consider removing the darned thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2009
At a packed Mount Washington Tavern happy hour, Fagee Sugarman stands out in the crowd. And that's how the retired jewelry saleswoman and gift shop owner likes it. She goes for a slightly "edgy" style; something with a slight biker bent. The formula that works for her? "I usually do black and then add a pop of color, or silver or gold." The only thing she loves more than her many leather jackets ("I have them in every color") and her more than 150 belts? Shopping for them. Age:: "Over 50 and under 70" Residence: : Pikesville Job:: Retired Radcliffe Jewelers sales associate and gift shop owner Self-described style: : "Edgy."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | June 4, 2008
If you belong to a gym, you know that people do all sorts of annoying things during workouts. They sweat all over the exercise equipment and don't bother to wipe it off. They park themselves on a machine and yak for 20 minutes with friends, preventing others from using it. They sing loudly - and badly - when listening to their iPods on treadmills and stair-steppers. And they grunt and groan and shout things like "Yeah, baby!" to psych themselves and show everyone what a killer workout they're having.
NEWS
October 6, 2004
On Tuesday, October 5, 2004, ALLEN JOSEPH SUGARMAN, beloved husband of Sonya Sugarman (nee Shuman), beloved father of Mark, Noah and Michael Sugarman, all of Baltimore, MD and the late Terry Sugarman. Devoted brother of Robert and Rabbi Marvin Sugarman, Pearl Falk and the late Norma Gurey, loving grandfather of Terry Sugarman. Services at SOL LEVINSON BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Wednesday, October 6, at 10 A.M. Interment Chofetz Chaim-Adas Bnai Israel Cemetery, Rosedale.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 25, 2001
The fiercest foe of effective public policy is the human trait that insists that being absolutely right is more gratifying than getting something done. Piety -- often hysterical -- commonly cripples important debates about privacy, abortion, capital punishment, land use, criminal justice, education, economic principles and more. No subject of wide public concern in the United States is more polarized than the matter of guns. As every American knows, guns, wielded by people, kill people -- far, far too many of them.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 9, 2000
Surprise! The Democratic ticket is more sanctimonius than the GOP's, which is more fun than the Democratics'. Sorry. There's just no way to vote for Bush and Lieberman. Vote for George! A chicken fajita in every microwave. Q. What exactly is a Verizon? A. That's what the union wants to find out. Cheer Up. The Sugarman sculpture is back in front of the Garmatz courthouse.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 7, 2000
For the august judges at Baltimore's Edward A. Garmatz federal courthouse, May 30 might as well have been called Black Tuesday. That day marked the return of their nemesis to the courthouse plaza, a whimsically painted outdoor sculpture by New York artist George Sugarman entitled "Baltimore Federal." Over the past quarter century, the court's sober-minded jurists had come to loathe the work heartily. It was removed three years ago for repairs, and it's recent return to the Garmatz building inevitably ignited longstanding local grumbling.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
For two decades, few people have understood the multicolored metal sculpture outside Baltimore's federal courthouse. Even fewer have liked it.As workers at the Edward A. Garmatz federal courthouse finished dismantling "Baltimore Federal" yesterday and sent it away for a five-month makeover, many who work at the building expressed hope it would never return."
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
An increase in single-family home sales -- with an assist from condominiums -- has helped ease the sagging Baltimore metropolitan new-homes market, according to third-quarter statistics released by Housing Data Reports.According to the Washington-based firm, which tracks and analyzes new-home sales, there was a 4.6 percent rise in sales during July, August and September and a 7.7 percent gain in condominium sales over the same period in 1996.Yet even with these gains, HDR said year-to-date overall sales for single-family detached homes, townhouses and condominiums remained 7.2 percent off the pace, with 5,953 units sold compared with 6,421 in 1996.
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