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By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2005
The telephones don't work in Louisiana's St. Bernard Parish. In any case, there's no one to answer them. Nobody - not even business executives desperate to learn the fate of their employees - is allowed into the washed-out community. Domino Sugar is frantically battling against this information blackout to find the 332 people who until last week worked at its refinery there in Chalmette, southeast of New Orleans. Domino's owners, who also operate the landmark Baltimore factory, have paid for airtime on cable news channels to broadcast a toll-free number for people to call.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Think sunshine - not just sweetness - when you see the Domino Sugars sign lighting up the Inner Harbor at night. Solar panels have been installed on a rooftop at the sugar refinery off Key Highway to illuminate the neon fixture that's long been a landmark of the Baltimore skyline. The photovoltaic array is part of a push by Domino and its corporate parent, Florida-based ASR Group, to make the world's leading producer of cane sugar a little greener. With the $125,000 solar installation and other moves, "we hope to show Baltimore every day that sustainability is top-of-mind here and at our facilities across the globe," said Peter O'Malley, ASR Group's vice president of corporate relations.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | November 3, 2007
Its dimensions and power inspire urban awe: the second-largest field of neon on the East Coast, a 120-by-70-foot spectacular electrical blaze that has cast its blood-orange radiance across the upriver waters of the Patapsco since April 25, 1951. "The sign has 650 neon tubes searing a 760-amps-per-hour image into the psyche of Charm City," as a Sun article described it a decade ago. Baltimore's iconic Domino Sugars sign (the final S is never pronounced, nor is it part of the company's official name)
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
The parent company of Domino Sugar, whose iconic sign lights up at the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, said Thursday it completed its acquisition of Tate & Lyle PLC's European sugar refining business. American Sugar Refining Inc., which owns the Baltimore sugar refinery, announced the $314 million deal in July. Under the transaction, ASR bought cane sugar refineries in London and Lisbon as well as the license to use the Tate & Lyle sugar brand. American Sugar Refining markets its products under the Domino, C&H and Redpath brands.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
The parent company of Domino Sugar, whose iconic sign lights up at the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, said Thursday it completed its acquisition of Tate & Lyle PLC's European sugar refining business. American Sugar Refining Inc., which owns the Baltimore sugar refinery, announced the $314 million deal in July. Under the transaction, ASR bought cane sugar refineries in London and Lisbon as well as the license to use the Tate & Lyle sugar brand. American Sugar Refining markets its products under the Domino, C&H and Redpath brands.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
You may not want to eat fish caught in Baltimore Harbor, but the funky water apparently is a little sweeter, thanks to the Domino Sugar refinery with the distinctive red neon sign.The Maryland Department of the Environment and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency say Domino has been spilling brown raw sugar into the Patapsco River as it unloads ships at its Inner Harbor processing plant.A little spilled sugar may seem harmless enough, but it's producing sour exchanges between environmental regulators and the New York-based company.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Think sunshine - not just sweetness - when you see the Domino Sugars sign lighting up the Inner Harbor at night. Solar panels have been installed on a rooftop at the sugar refinery off Key Highway to illuminate the neon fixture that's long been a landmark of the Baltimore skyline. The photovoltaic array is part of a push by Domino and its corporate parent, Florida-based ASR Group, to make the world's leading producer of cane sugar a little greener. With the $125,000 solar installation and other moves, "we hope to show Baltimore every day that sustainability is top-of-mind here and at our facilities across the globe," said Peter O'Malley, ASR Group's vice president of corporate relations.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2003
The Domino Sugars sign that blazes in red neon from a Brooklyn, N.Y., sugar plant - as much an icon as a similar sign on Baltimore's waterfront - could soon go dark when the refinery on New York's East River shuts down. But plans to stop refining sugar in Brooklyn by February will actually benefit the Domino plant in Baltimore, a company official said yesterday. The plant in Locust Point is expected to pick up most of the production work now being done at the Brooklyn refinery, said Jack Lay, president and chief executive of American Sugar Refinery Inc., which owns the plants and markets sugar products under the Domino brand.
NEWS
June 26, 2005
On June 23, 2005 SYLVAN "Redds", "Flem", "Big Redds" FLEMING, husband of Evelyn Fleming. He was a self-employed barber and retiree of Domino Sugar Refinery. Family and friends may call Joseph L. Russ Funeral Home P.A., 2222 W. North Avenue, Thursday 3 to 8 P.M. Services Friday July 1 at Russ West, wake 10 A.M. with funeral to follow.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY CHRISTOPHER T. ASSAF and PHOTOS BY CHRISTOPHER T. ASSAF,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | December 19, 2005
Locust Point, where the Tide Point complex and the Domino Sugar refinery are located, has an interesting history and a promising future. It once served as a gateway for immigrants into the United States and was the second-largest point of entry after New York's Ellis Island. Now this area on the harbor, which was once secluded from much of Baltimore, continues to emerge and will change even more with the development of Silo Point next to Tide Point.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | November 3, 2007
Its dimensions and power inspire urban awe: the second-largest field of neon on the East Coast, a 120-by-70-foot spectacular electrical blaze that has cast its blood-orange radiance across the upriver waters of the Patapsco since April 25, 1951. "The sign has 650 neon tubes searing a 760-amps-per-hour image into the psyche of Charm City," as a Sun article described it a decade ago. Baltimore's iconic Domino Sugars sign (the final S is never pronounced, nor is it part of the company's official name)
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2005
The telephones don't work in Louisiana's St. Bernard Parish. In any case, there's no one to answer them. Nobody - not even business executives desperate to learn the fate of their employees - is allowed into the washed-out community. Domino Sugar is frantically battling against this information blackout to find the 332 people who until last week worked at its refinery there in Chalmette, southeast of New Orleans. Domino's owners, who also operate the landmark Baltimore factory, have paid for airtime on cable news channels to broadcast a toll-free number for people to call.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2003
The Domino Sugars sign that blazes in red neon from a Brooklyn, N.Y., sugar plant - as much an icon as a similar sign on Baltimore's waterfront - could soon go dark when the refinery on New York's East River shuts down. But plans to stop refining sugar in Brooklyn by February will actually benefit the Domino plant in Baltimore, a company official said yesterday. The plant in Locust Point is expected to pick up most of the production work now being done at the Brooklyn refinery, said Jack Lay, president and chief executive of American Sugar Refinery Inc., which owns the plants and markets sugar products under the Domino brand.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
You may not want to eat fish caught in Baltimore Harbor, but the funky water apparently is a little sweeter, thanks to the Domino Sugar refinery with the distinctive red neon sign.The Maryland Department of the Environment and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency say Domino has been spilling brown raw sugar into the Patapsco River as it unloads ships at its Inner Harbor processing plant.A little spilled sugar may seem harmless enough, but it's producing sour exchanges between environmental regulators and the New York-based company.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | December 1, 1991
From The Sun Dec. 1-7, 1841DEC. 1: We yesterday received a delightful dish of fried oysters. An accompanying note informed us that they came from the restaurant of Messers. Krine & Hoffman, a new establishment just opened at No. 34 Eutaw Street, corner of Wagon Alley.DEC. 2: The lecture before the Maryland Institute will be one worthy of attention. The lecturer, Francis S. Key, Esq., is one of the most distinguished advocates of our country and whatever he touches cannot be otherwise than elegant.
NEWS
November 15, 1990
Services for Ruth S. Haynes, a retired labor union official, will be held at 10 a.m. today at the Greater Faith Hope Tabernacle, 1900 E. 30th St.Mrs. Haynes, who was 78, died of cancer Friday at her home on Sequoia Avenue.She retired in 1979 as an international representative of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union after 35 years with the organization and its predecessors.She was introduced to union work while employed at the American Sugar Refinery in Baltimore, serving there as chair of the grievance committee and as a member of the executive board of Local 392 of the United Packinghouse Workers.
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