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Sugar Hill

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NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
The distressing sight of boarded-up rowhouses along Druid Hill Avenue, between Baltimore's biggest park and North Avenue, makes it hard to believe that this decayed neighborhood was once home for many of the city's most successful African-American strivers. From the 1920s until the late 1940s, this was the famed Sugar Hill, the namesake of a similarly upscale part of Harlem. Prominent lawyers and educators lived in the modest, cramped two-story rowhouses near Druid Hill Park; so did waiters, bell captains and postal workers.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones | March 21, 2008
The city liquor board yesterday revoked the license for Sugar Hill Tavern in the 2300 block of Druid Hill Ave., citing drug activity within the bar and a significant number of violations for underage drinking. More than a dozen police reports since July have been filed about that establishment, the liquor board said. Most of the allegations concerned drug sales between patrons, according to Stephan Fogleman, chairman of the liquor board, the state agency that regulates bars and adult entertainment venues in the city.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones | March 21, 2008
The city liquor board yesterday revoked the license for Sugar Hill Tavern in the 2300 block of Druid Hill Ave., citing drug activity within the bar and a significant number of violations for underage drinking. More than a dozen police reports since July have been filed about that establishment, the liquor board said. Most of the allegations concerned drug sales between patrons, according to Stephan Fogleman, chairman of the liquor board, the state agency that regulates bars and adult entertainment venues in the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2006
Allison Moorer [Sugar Hill] B There's still some of the Neil Young/Crazy Horse hurricane-force power that characterized her 2004 album Duel, but this time the Alabama singer-songwriter and producer Steve Earle (her husband) are more interested in showing off Moorer's power-pop chops, veering wide and far from her country roots. That leads to a few cuts that scream "hit single," but light and breezy romance has never been what has made Moorer worth seeking out. The leadoff track, "Work to Do," and the "Got to Get You Into My Life"-inspired "If It's Just for Today" bring a level of thoughtfulness to bouncy and hummable tunes that puts them a notch above most of what's on Top 40 radio - not that these are likely to wind up there.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 2, 1992
Grand Puba probably puts it best. Speaking over a loping funk groove at the end of the Brand New Heavies' "Who Makes the Loot?", the rapper announces that "This is how we gonna move it for the '90s."Check it out," he says. "This ain't no loop -- this is the real-live, funky, get-down on the get-down. . . . The bass player's real, and the drummer's real. . . . Everything is live, you know what I'm sayin'?"Maybe you don't. For the majority of pop musicians, recording with a live rhythm section is the norm -- nothing to boast about.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 13, 1994
It's an ancient pattern: the gifted African-American writer who begins to feel the chafing of racism and the despair in his community a little too acutely against his skin. Each day becomes a little misery. He knows: I'll die if I stay here. Or, the same thing: I'll never write again if I stay here. So he goes into exile.Paris, usually. Richard Wright went to Paris. Chester Himes went to Paris. James Baldwin went to Paris.Barry Michael Cooper went to Baltimore.In Baltimore he found what had died in the Harlem that nurtured him: a community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Thomas Kintner and Thomas Kintner,HARTFORD COURANT | August 25, 2005
The young trio Nickel Creek has been hailed as the torchbearer for modern bluegrass, even as its members have claimed the band is not looking to be the genre's new face. The Grammy-winning act reinforces its assertion musically with the engaging, disparate Why Should the Fire Die?, which plays fast and loose with stylistic boundaries while showcasing the artistic strength and atypical composure that anchors the probing, eclectic tunes. The group delivers its songs in musical language unencumbered by tradition or commercial restrictions, leaning into rock flavors while packing plenty of melodic atmosphere into the sharp-edged "Best of Luck."
FEATURES
By Adam Pertman and Adam Pertman,BOSTON GLOBE | July 26, 1998
An elegant granite wall stands in a courtyard behind a large parking structure, a couple of fast-food restaurants and a local bank in the heart of the Los Angeles business district. The artist's engravings on the monument relate a compelling bit of American history about a woman's perseverance and intelligence, about her rise from destitution to wealth.Most schools don't teach anything about Biddie Mason's life or achievements, however, and her monument isn't listed in most guidebooks about the attractions of Los Angeles.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | February 12, 1991
IF YOU grew up in Baltimore city, you grew up in a neighborhood and probably spent a good deal of time in the neighborhood pharmacy -- be it in Hamilton, Govans, Park Heights or Highlandtown. And if you grew up black in the neighborhood around Druid Hill Avenue and Presstman Street (sometimes called Sugar Hill) you will remember Weaver's Pharmacy.Weaver's was one of only four black-owned pharmacies at mid-century. The others were Green's at McCulloh and Laurens streets, Young's at Druid Hill Avenue at Dolphin Street and Kerr's at Fremont and Lafayette avenues.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 2000
A group of Latino and black industry insiders is hoping to broaden the idea of a "crossover" from just success in the white community to mean making movies that appeal to the nation's two largest minority groups. "We are trying to bring the two worlds and audiences together because it makes sense," said Debra Martin Chase, executive vice president of Whitney Houston's BrownHouse Productions. "As substantial minority groups, there are social and political situations that are common to both.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Thomas Kintner and Thomas Kintner,HARTFORD COURANT | August 25, 2005
The young trio Nickel Creek has been hailed as the torchbearer for modern bluegrass, even as its members have claimed the band is not looking to be the genre's new face. The Grammy-winning act reinforces its assertion musically with the engaging, disparate Why Should the Fire Die?, which plays fast and loose with stylistic boundaries while showcasing the artistic strength and atypical composure that anchors the probing, eclectic tunes. The group delivers its songs in musical language unencumbered by tradition or commercial restrictions, leaning into rock flavors while packing plenty of melodic atmosphere into the sharp-edged "Best of Luck."
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
The distressing sight of boarded-up rowhouses along Druid Hill Avenue, between Baltimore's biggest park and North Avenue, makes it hard to believe that this decayed neighborhood was once home for many of the city's most successful African-American strivers. From the 1920s until the late 1940s, this was the famed Sugar Hill, the namesake of a similarly upscale part of Harlem. Prominent lawyers and educators lived in the modest, cramped two-story rowhouses near Druid Hill Park; so did waiters, bell captains and postal workers.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 2000
A group of Latino and black industry insiders is hoping to broaden the idea of a "crossover" from just success in the white community to mean making movies that appeal to the nation's two largest minority groups. "We are trying to bring the two worlds and audiences together because it makes sense," said Debra Martin Chase, executive vice president of Whitney Houston's BrownHouse Productions. "As substantial minority groups, there are social and political situations that are common to both.
FEATURES
By Adam Pertman and Adam Pertman,BOSTON GLOBE | July 26, 1998
An elegant granite wall stands in a courtyard behind a large parking structure, a couple of fast-food restaurants and a local bank in the heart of the Los Angeles business district. The artist's engravings on the monument relate a compelling bit of American history about a woman's perseverance and intelligence, about her rise from destitution to wealth.Most schools don't teach anything about Biddie Mason's life or achievements, however, and her monument isn't listed in most guidebooks about the attractions of Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1997
Three prominent members of the "Sugar Hill" gang received lengthy federal prison sentences yesterday for their roles in an open-air drug supermarket that sold as much as $65,000 worth of heroin a day in East Baltimore.Yesterday's prison sentences, handed down in U.S. District Court in Baltimore by Judge Andre M. Davis, were the first to be imposed after 14 members of the gang pleaded guilty this year. Three more men will be sentenced Friday.The stiffest sentence -- 12 years -- went to Jesse Clay, 26, who prosecutors say was one of the chief figures in the organization.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Blacks and whites, Christians and Jews who grew up together in Baltimore's Reservoir Hill -- but on opposite sides of racial segregation -- shared a fondly remembered past and fervent hopes for the future on a jovial bus-and-walking tour of familiar haunts yesterday."
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Blacks and whites, Christians and Jews who grew up together in Baltimore's Reservoir Hill -- but on opposite sides of racial segregation -- shared a fondly remembered past and fervent hopes for the future on a jovial bus-and-walking tour of familiar haunts yesterday."
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2006
Allison Moorer [Sugar Hill] B There's still some of the Neil Young/Crazy Horse hurricane-force power that characterized her 2004 album Duel, but this time the Alabama singer-songwriter and producer Steve Earle (her husband) are more interested in showing off Moorer's power-pop chops, veering wide and far from her country roots. That leads to a few cuts that scream "hit single," but light and breezy romance has never been what has made Moorer worth seeking out. The leadoff track, "Work to Do," and the "Got to Get You Into My Life"-inspired "If It's Just for Today" bring a level of thoughtfulness to bouncy and hummable tunes that puts them a notch above most of what's on Top 40 radio - not that these are likely to wind up there.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 13, 1994
It's an ancient pattern: the gifted African-American writer who begins to feel the chafing of racism and the despair in his community a little too acutely against his skin. Each day becomes a little misery. He knows: I'll die if I stay here. Or, the same thing: I'll never write again if I stay here. So he goes into exile.Paris, usually. Richard Wright went to Paris. Chester Himes went to Paris. James Baldwin went to Paris.Barry Michael Cooper went to Baltimore.In Baltimore he found what had died in the Harlem that nurtured him: a community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 25, 1994
In its every frame, "Sugar Hill" yearns to be a crime classic, a melancholy elegy on the theme of the gangster who wants out.It's built around an exquisitely controlled performance by Wesley Snipes as Roemello Skuggs, the brilliant son of a Harlem junkie who opted out of a prep school to take over and make a success of the family business, which happens to be selling narcotics.You may have some trouble with a story that demands that you perceive a big-time dope dealer as a tragic figure, and invites you to invest in his soul-deep sadness, and further insists that you connect with his need to get away with his considerable millions to live a life of luxury on a plantation in South Carolina.
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