Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSuffrage
IN THE NEWS

Suffrage

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | August 25, 1995
TOMORROW IS the 75th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment providing for woman suffrage. It's certainly a time for celebration. But the story of the drive to obtain this basic right is scarcely ennobling -- including the final act, the antics of the state legislature that put the amendment into effect.In fact, the amendment, first introduced in December 1868, witnessed so many setbacks that prudent observers would have given little likelihood of its ultimate ratification.The initial congressional effort died quickly.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Lynette Long | April 30, 2010
Earlier this year, Rep. Patrick McHenry, a North Carolina Republican, introduced legislation that would take President Ulysses S. Grant off the $50 bill and replace him with President Ronald Reagan. This legislation has sparked currency wars as Reagan supporters try to unseat Grant, who has held jurisdiction over the $50 bill since 1913. The original $50 bill was issued in 1863 and sported a picture of Alexander Hamilton. The images of seven different men have graced the fifty, George Washington being the only other president.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Elaine Scarry | February 19, 1993
THE debate over gays in the military has led many people to worry that gay men and women lack not only military rights but civil rights as well.This is borne out by the history of military rights in this country, which is closely entwined with civil rights.To have one is to have the other; to lack one is to lack the other.The 26th Amendment, for example, which lowered the voting age from 21 to 18 in 1971, was argued primarily on the basis that the Vietnam generation had shown its authority to vote at 18 both by fighting in Vietnam and by deliberating about the war on university campuses.
NEWS
December 26, 2005
It is obviously very tempting to celebrate any successful political action by Hong Kong's dedicated corps of democracy activists. And at first glance, the legislative defeat last week of a Beijing-backed package of modest political reforms was a rare victory for the territory's pro-democracy forces. But it might ultimately prove to be a big setback on the path toward their ultimate goal: universal suffrage. The defeated reform package, pushed hard by Beijing, would have doubled the size of the appointed committee that selects Hong Kong's chief executive and enlarged its legislature, only half elected by the public.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 24, 2005
BOSTON -- Call me a cockeyed pessimist, but I'm having trouble finding any good news in the trashing of Harriet Miers. Somehow Ms. Miers has become proof that we have moved on to a great gender-free utopia, a post-feminist world in which we can now mercilessly tear down a woman without fear of being labeled a sexist piglet. First we were told that Ms. Miers got the nod as a woman. Now we are told that the full-scale attack proves she is one of the boys. Whoopee. I'm not a big fan of Ms. Miers, but I do not see her as proof of the arch prediction that equality would be the day mediocre women take their place beside mediocre men. So I can't sign on with those who see the slashing of Ms. Miers by women as a sign of progress for women.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | November 8, 1998
25 years ago: A $1.25 million Black and Decker expansion tops the building permits granted in Westminster since Oct. 24. -- The Carroll Record, Nov. 8, 1973.50 years ago: Young America did fine here over Halloween, confining their pranks mostly to throwing corn. In Frederick, they took several wagons and farm machinery from a dealer's place of business. One wagon was found near Rocky Ridge. In Hagerstown, they resorted to breaking automobile windshields. Some damage was done in Thurmont. Last year, 11 were arrested and paid fines for their pranks.
NEWS
By Lynette Long | April 30, 2010
Earlier this year, Rep. Patrick McHenry, a North Carolina Republican, introduced legislation that would take President Ulysses S. Grant off the $50 bill and replace him with President Ronald Reagan. This legislation has sparked currency wars as Reagan supporters try to unseat Grant, who has held jurisdiction over the $50 bill since 1913. The original $50 bill was issued in 1863 and sported a picture of Alexander Hamilton. The images of seven different men have graced the fifty, George Washington being the only other president.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 6, 1998
BOSTON -- So we part company. Again.Just a couple of weeks ago, I took some small comfort from the fact that this sex scandal had not opened up a gender gap. Since then, I've been reminded in no uncertain terms that it's opened up the intra-gender gap. Again.Women who once came from different ends of the political spectrum to skewer Gary Hart have now retreated to opposite sides over the fate of President Clinton.A phalanx of women's rights leaders to the left. A coterie from the ranks of the Independent Women's Forum to the right.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | October 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- As you head to your polling place Nov. 7, about 4 million Americans -- 2 percent of the adult population -- all mentally competent and otherwise qualified to cast a ballot, will be barred by law from voting with you. In Alabama alone, nearly 18 percent of the African-American population will be forbidden -- again by statute -- from voting. And in nearby Virginia, fully 25 percent of all black males will be denied a say in who governs them and who taxes their families. Why?
NEWS
August 25, 1995
Women heroes deserve betterAs this nation celebrates the 75th anniversary of women's right to vote, the good old boys in Congress, including Newt Gingrich, reveal their true attitudes toward women by exercising their power to confine the suffrage monument to the dark, gloomy ground floor of the Capitol.The 1920 statue by artist Adelaide Johnson of Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton remains buried in the crypt while statues of Abraham Lincoln, George Washington and Martin Luther King Jr. adorn the prestigious rotunda above.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 24, 2005
BOSTON -- Call me a cockeyed pessimist, but I'm having trouble finding any good news in the trashing of Harriet Miers. Somehow Ms. Miers has become proof that we have moved on to a great gender-free utopia, a post-feminist world in which we can now mercilessly tear down a woman without fear of being labeled a sexist piglet. First we were told that Ms. Miers got the nod as a woman. Now we are told that the full-scale attack proves she is one of the boys. Whoopee. I'm not a big fan of Ms. Miers, but I do not see her as proof of the arch prediction that equality would be the day mediocre women take their place beside mediocre men. So I can't sign on with those who see the slashing of Ms. Miers by women as a sign of progress for women.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 14, 2004
The year is 1912, and two suffragettes are sitting in a Philadelphia coffee shop having a friendly argument about political strategy. One cites progress made in the national campaign. The other says, "What? Sixty-four years of begging, and women can now vote in nine states? How many years is that per state? ... You do the math." "Look," her friend says, warning her that such statements could cost them a promotion to the national office, "you want to be two girls on a corner soap box? Or, do you want to go to Washington and play with the big lads?"
TOPIC
By Gwendolyn Glenn | December 3, 2000
I'M DISTURBED by recent polls showing that a majority of Americans believe it's taking too long to determine the outcome of the presidential election. They want a quick fix, while ignoring the fact that thousands of Floridians believe their ballots were erroneously thrown out. Last Sunday, I was appalled as I watched protestors stationed outside the home of Vice President Al Gore. They were calling for Gore to concede even though many Florida voters say they were disenfranchised by badly designed ballots, Election Day glitches and a confusing recount process.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | October 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- As you head to your polling place Nov. 7, about 4 million Americans -- 2 percent of the adult population -- all mentally competent and otherwise qualified to cast a ballot, will be barred by law from voting with you. In Alabama alone, nearly 18 percent of the African-American population will be forbidden -- again by statute -- from voting. And in nearby Virginia, fully 25 percent of all black males will be denied a say in who governs them and who taxes their families. Why?
TOPIC
By Mark Ribbing | September 3, 2000
THIS YEAR'S presidential election will be the 54th in the nation's history. From the time of the first election in 1789, when a reluctant George Washington was unanimously chosen by a small group of electors to be the chief executive of the new United States, the process of selecting a president has changed enormously. The 2000 election reflects that change in ways large and small. Even the most basic realities of the present campaign -- such as the bruising and highly public nomination process, the overriding importance of television, the nonstop fund raising -- would likely have been either unimaginable or downright appalling to Washington and his contemporaries.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
The Rouse Co., which founded Columbia as a community of diversity and tolerance, has decided to name its newest neighborhood after a U.S. senator who fought to keep his political power by depriving blacks of the right to vote. The company's development arm wants to call the 517-acre project north of Laurel Gorman's Promise after U.S. Sen. Arthur Pue Gorman, a Howard County native who was an early baseball player and the state's Democratic Party boss for 30 years. But yesterday, David E. Forester, vice president for Howard Research and Development, said the company will investigate the revelations about Gorman's efforts to disenfranchise blacks.
NEWS
December 26, 2005
It is obviously very tempting to celebrate any successful political action by Hong Kong's dedicated corps of democracy activists. And at first glance, the legislative defeat last week of a Beijing-backed package of modest political reforms was a rare victory for the territory's pro-democracy forces. But it might ultimately prove to be a big setback on the path toward their ultimate goal: universal suffrage. The defeated reform package, pushed hard by Beijing, would have doubled the size of the appointed committee that selects Hong Kong's chief executive and enlarged its legislature, only half elected by the public.
NEWS
By A. Robert Kaufman | July 14, 1998
THOSE of us who organize in the interest of the dispossessed are burdened with the fact that they are just that. For the most part, they do not vote. Consequently, politicians can, more often than not, ignore their needs.Many don't vote because they don't know of any electoral candidate who would truly represent their interests.Many others don't vote because the government has disenfranchised them.There are three categories of the disenfranchised that I am particularly concerned about: the young, felons and legal aliens.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,New York Times News Service | January 6, 2000
WATERLOO, N.Y. -- Ending months of uncertainty over the fate of a historic property that was central to the movement for women's rights in the United States, a nonprofit organization acquired the Hunt House in Waterloo, N.Y., at auction recently, pledging to restore it and donate it to the National Park Service. In a spirited 40-minute telephone battle among five bidders, the 1829 house was sold for $231,000 -- $91,100 above the asking price. The winner was the Trust for Public Land, a nonprofit conservation organization.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 4, 1999
KUWAIT -- Kuwaitis voted yesterday in what may be the country's last all-male elections, after a campaign dominated by a heated national discussion of whether it is time to allow women political rights.Many candidates for seats in Kuwait's 50-member Parliament have vowed to block a decree that would allow Kuwaiti women to vote in the next election, expected in 2003. The decree must be approved by the new Parliament, which is expected to convene by mid-July.Some women, including Masoumah al-Mubarak, a leading political activist, have already declared their candidacies for the next election, and most believe that the all-male Parliament that was being elected yesterday will ultimately bow to the emir's wishes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.