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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 1997
CALVERTON, N.Y. - With the push of a button, Jack Van de Wetering, the largest producer of greenhouse plants in the New York metropolitan region, can rotate his entire crop of 10 million plants in just one hour."
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NEWS
By The Boston Globe | November 18, 2007
Inside Boston's Suffolk County House of Correction, the towering, 1,900-bed prison next to the Southeast Expressway, the scenery is as uninspiring as one would imagine: concrete-block walls, orange jumpsuits, guards with German shepherds. But on a recent morning, in a narrow, windowless classroom, Doug Savory's thoughts moved beyond the walls around him. A tall, wiry inmate in a loose, pajama-like uniform, Savory looked peaceful as he stood over a worktable covered with scraps of handmade cotton paper.
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NEWS
By Matthew Purdy and Matthew Purdy,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 8, 2002
SOUTHAMPTON , N.Y. -- Middle-class year-rounders in the Hamptons come to accept the miles of millionaires inching Porsches through summertime traffic to the next tent party. But they did not expect this influx from the other extreme. The newest Long Island East Enders are homeless, 329 of them, crammed into Southampton motels for months on end as Suffolk County scrounges for space for a homeless population that has more than doubled since 1999. Suddenly year-round residents are wedged between the entitled rich and the entitlement programs of the poor.
NEWS
May 8, 2006
From New Mexico to New York, states overburdened with growing populations of undocumented immigrants are pressing Congress to force the federal government to reimburse them for local expenses related to illegal immigration. State officials want congressional lawmakers to include this requirement in immigration legislation currently being considered. The states' position underscores the need for lawmakers, who are deeply divided on immigration reform, to come to some agreement at a time when jurisdictions around the country are increasingly feeling abandoned by the federal government.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 24, 1993
RIVERHEAD, N.Y. -- Every inmate in the Suffolk County Jail here had the same ingredients: a bed sheet, a can of abrasive cleanser for the cell and a leftover plastic cereal bowl.But who would have thought that, combined, they constituted the recipe for a jailbreak?Suffolk County Sheriff Patrick Mahoney said yesterday that one enterprising convicted felon made an unsuccessful escape attempt by ripping a sheet into strips that were then twisted and soaked overnight in a bowl with abrasive cleanser and water to make a thread so strong it could saw through steel bars.
NEWS
May 8, 2006
From New Mexico to New York, states overburdened with growing populations of undocumented immigrants are pressing Congress to force the federal government to reimburse them for local expenses related to illegal immigration. State officials want congressional lawmakers to include this requirement in immigration legislation currently being considered. The states' position underscores the need for lawmakers, who are deeply divided on immigration reform, to come to some agreement at a time when jurisdictions around the country are increasingly feeling abandoned by the federal government.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 4, 1993
OAKDALE, N.Y. -- If Adelphi University compares itself to Harvard in advertising, perhaps Dowling College should consider billing itself as Long Island's answer to Mister Rogers' Neighborhood.Beginning Monday, the Oakdale college started using a Suffolk County crossing guard -- normally a protector of younger school children -- to help the college's 5,000 students cross what the college says is a dangerous street during the college's two-week spring registration.Suffolk County police officials say it is the first time a county crossing guard has been requested by a local institution of higher learning.
NEWS
August 9, 1995
What is it about the air in this region and off-duty New York area police officers?Last spring, a group of Big Apple policemen took part in a drunken Washington rampage. They were in D.C. to honor deceased officers. Then, last Thursday, an off-duty Suffolk County, N.Y., officer was tossed out of Oriole Park after beating the stuffing out of the Oriole Bird mascot. He attended the game with 14 fellow Long Island officers.What would make a grown man beat up a team mascot in full view of dozens of onlookers?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 26, 1995
New York state's worst ground fire in decades -- a vast arc of windblown flames that boiled in 40-foot walls, scorched miles of pine woods and burned a dozen homes and other property -- raged for a second day in Suffolk County yesterday.But last night its threat to a South Shore resort community appeared to ease, and officials said it might be brought under control today.The fire also raised a testy political issue between state authorities who anticipated airborne tankers to fight the flames and federal officials who failed to fulfill a promise to deliver them yesterday.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 1997
RIVERHEAD, N.Y. -- Steve Iavarone, vice president of the Long Island UFO Network, sits in his second-floor den and glances at his collection of alien kitsch, his massive electronic telescope, his videotape collection that extends from "2001" to "Cocoon." Like the rest -- the friends, the former colleagues, the neighbors who haven't sold their homes and fled for less radioactive parts of Long Island -- he is steadfast.They are the true believers, the ones who can't accept that John J. Ford, red-blooded American right down to his name, could have plotted an assassination.
NEWS
By Matthew Purdy and Matthew Purdy,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 8, 2002
SOUTHAMPTON , N.Y. -- Middle-class year-rounders in the Hamptons come to accept the miles of millionaires inching Porsches through summertime traffic to the next tent party. But they did not expect this influx from the other extreme. The newest Long Island East Enders are homeless, 329 of them, crammed into Southampton motels for months on end as Suffolk County scrounges for space for a homeless population that has more than doubled since 1999. Suddenly year-round residents are wedged between the entitled rich and the entitlement programs of the poor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2000
NEW YORK - Rep. Rick A. Lazio of Long Island came roaring into the race for senator from New York yesterday, attacking Hillary Rodham Clinton as a "far-left, extremist" candidate who has "no real rationale for serving here other than as a steppingstone to some other position." "I think her ambition is the issue," Lazio declared in an interview, as he formally announced his candidacy in a race that has been upended by the decision of Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani to step aside for health reasons.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1998
RIVERHEAD, N.Y. -- Stung by criticism that he has failed to protect dwindling farmland from development, Suffolk County Executive Robert Gaffney says that he planned to revitalize a farmland preservation program that was started in the 1970s.In his annual state of the county address here to the Suffolk legislature, Gaffney said he would propose "a significant increase" in spending to buy development rights to farms on the East End, where nearly all of Suffolk's remaining 33,000 farm acres are located.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 20, 1998
MANORVILLE, N.Y. - In the late 1950s, when Cristos Alexandrou was a teen-ager, he fled the family farm on the outskirts of Larnaca, a seaport in Cyprus. He worked at a gas station in Larnaca, became a businessman with a small fleet of taxis and rental cars, then moved to New York City in 1972, where he worked in parking garages, drove taxis and tow trucks and spent all his money in nightclubs in Astoria. "Whatever I made, I spent the same day," Alexandrou recalls.Now, at age 56, Alexandrou has rejected the fast life and bright lights and returned to his pastoral roots, a few hundred yards from Exit 69 on the Long Island Expressway.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 1997
CALVERTON, N.Y. - With the push of a button, Jack Van de Wetering, the largest producer of greenhouse plants in the New York metropolitan region, can rotate his entire crop of 10 million plants in just one hour."
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 1997
RIVERHEAD, N.Y. -- Steve Iavarone, vice president of the Long Island UFO Network, sits in his second-floor den and glances at his collection of alien kitsch, his massive electronic telescope, his videotape collection that extends from "2001" to "Cocoon." Like the rest -- the friends, the former colleagues, the neighbors who haven't sold their homes and fled for less radioactive parts of Long Island -- he is steadfast.They are the true believers, the ones who can't accept that John J. Ford, red-blooded American right down to his name, could have plotted an assassination.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2000
NEW YORK - Rep. Rick A. Lazio of Long Island came roaring into the race for senator from New York yesterday, attacking Hillary Rodham Clinton as a "far-left, extremist" candidate who has "no real rationale for serving here other than as a steppingstone to some other position." "I think her ambition is the issue," Lazio declared in an interview, as he formally announced his candidacy in a race that has been upended by the decision of Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani to step aside for health reasons.
NEWS
By The Boston Globe | November 18, 2007
Inside Boston's Suffolk County House of Correction, the towering, 1,900-bed prison next to the Southeast Expressway, the scenery is as uninspiring as one would imagine: concrete-block walls, orange jumpsuits, guards with German shepherds. But on a recent morning, in a narrow, windowless classroom, Doug Savory's thoughts moved beyond the walls around him. A tall, wiry inmate in a loose, pajama-like uniform, Savory looked peaceful as he stood over a worktable covered with scraps of handmade cotton paper.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- What next, President Clinton signing a bill confirming the virtues of apple pie?Now that he has reinforced the motherhood vote, before a Rose Garden bevy of happy moms and dads, by signing the bill assuring 48 hours of insured hospital care for new mothers and babies, there may be nothing left but an Apple Pie Preservation Act for the president to toss at hapless Bob Dole.Presidents seeking re-election have always used the power and opportunities of incumbency to help their own political cause, strewing goodies in the path as they go from state to state on the campaign trail -- a water project here, an education grant there, plus raising very big bucks for their party on the side.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 26, 1995
New York state's worst ground fire in decades -- a vast arc of windblown flames that boiled in 40-foot walls, scorched miles of pine woods and burned a dozen homes and other property -- raged for a second day in Suffolk County yesterday.But last night its threat to a South Shore resort community appeared to ease, and officials said it might be brought under control today.The fire also raised a testy political issue between state authorities who anticipated airborne tankers to fight the flames and federal officials who failed to fulfill a promise to deliver them yesterday.
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