Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSuffering
IN THE NEWS

Suffering

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 2, 2010
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman had successful surgery early Friday to cauterize what was termed "an arterial bleed in his septum," according to a statement from his spokesman, Kevin Enright. Dr. Domenick Coletti performed the surgery, and Enright said Ulman was "alert and talking." The executive was expected to be released Saturday from Howard County General Hospital. "The Ulmans truly appreciate the numerous calls, e-mails and well-wishes that have come their way during this time," Enright said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The words delivered in the Orioles clubhouse after another jaw-busting, late-inning loss to the Kansas City Royals in the American League Championship Series belied the otherwise eerie silence that punctuated the room. Bounce around from player to player after Saturday's 6-4 loss in Game 2 and, no matter who you talk to, the refrain remains the same. It's only two losses. These Orioles are great on the road. They have overcome so much adversity, what's a little more? “It's tough, it's a hole,” Orioles reliever Darren O'Day said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Balkan savagery is forcing Americans to think through a moral dilemma that brings to mind one of the great comic figures of English fiction -- Mrs. Jellyby in Charles Dickens' ''Bleak House.''She makes a brief but telling appearance in a brilliant essay soon to be published in The National Interest quarterly.The essay is ''Compassion and the Globalization of the Spectacle of Suffering,'' by Clifford Orwin of the University of Toronto.Mrs. Jellyby was the ditzy do-gooder who practiced ''telescopic philanthropy.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Coppin State University suffered a $2.5 million revenue shortfall this fall because of a drop in enrollment, and school officials said Tuesday that the deficit is being offset with cuts to the administration and other cost-saving measures rather than tuition increases. Coppin State spokeswoman Tiffany Jones said Tuesday that the school enrolled 3,133 students this fall, 250 less than a year ago. Tuition, plus fees, for in-state students is about $6,000. To offset part of the shortfall, a school vice president and an assistant vice president have been let go, Jones said.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | April 22, 1994
While chatting with a young audience on MTV, President Clinton was asked about the deep sense of "emptiness" that so many youths feel in their lives.The president responded with an upbeat pep talk, urging young people to shun cynicism and look to a brighter future.It will take more than pep talks and inspirational slogans to cure the widespread emotional blahs that allegedly afflict millions of young Americans.Because of the seriousness of this problem, I recently discussed with Dr. I.M. Kookie, the world-renowned expert on lots of stuff.
NEWS
By Daniel Callahan | April 15, 1998
FEW CAUSES or crusades have such universal support as medicine's war against suffering. None of us wants to be sick or to be in pain. Most people do not want to die. Yet we rarely ask when enough is enough in waging that war.At the extreme, almost everyone deplores the end-of-life killings allegedly confessed to, though later denied, by a respiratory therapist at Glendale Adventist Medical Center in Glendale, Calif.Let us assume, kindly, that such killings occur when the killer cannot bear watching people die miserably.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 25, 2000
MARATHON, Fla. -- Loggerhead sea turtles in the Florida Keys are suffering -- and in some cases dying -- from a mysterious illness that has marine experts and scientists searching for answers before record numbers of the endangered animal are lost. In the past six weeks, 11 adult loggerhead turtles have been rescued after being found floating near death in waters off the Keys. Four loggerheads were recently found with similar symptoms along Florida's east and west coasts, and dozens of floating turtles have been spotted by local boaters but have gone unsaved.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 26, 2001
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA- This Christmas, Argentine newspapers carried melancholy letters from children asking why their parents told them not to write a wish list. "Somebody stole my Christmas and somebody robbed me of my illusions of an extra dose of happiness," 14-year-old Ariel Minglanesio wrote to the newspaper La Prensa. "I want to know why my mother decided not to put up a Christmas tree this year. Tell me the names of those responsible so someone can punish them." In this moody city where the sounds of tango float into the street from waterfront bars, many Buenos Aires residents believe the thieves who stole Christmas were politicians in elegant Italian suits.
NEWS
By Drew Bailey and Drew Bailey,Staff Writer | April 5, 1992
A once-exiled South African political activist said she will use her own experiences with suffering to understand better the suffering of others, such as AIDS victims and substance abusers.Mankekolo Mahlangu-Ngcobo spoke Friday on what she called a "happy day" as she was ordained a deacon in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Ms. Mahlangu-Ngcobo fled South Africa in 1980 after she was exiled for taking part in political uprisings. She returned to South Africa for a visit last year.She is now assistant pastor at Bethel A.M.E.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2005
The public nature of Pope John Paul II's suffering - from the trembling of his hands brought on by Parkinson's disease to his final appearance at St. Peter's Square last week, when he tried tobut could not speak - was an extended lesson in the dignity and value of the lives of the most frail among us, theologians say. The pontiff did not hide his many ailments as he grew more infirm. Though his speech was slurred and his head often slumped to his chest because of the Parkinson's, he appeared in public frequently and rejected seclusion.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
A 23-year-old Halethorpe man was stabbed outside a Brooklyn Park 7-Eleven store early Sunday morning, Anne Arundel County police said Monday. Police said the victim got into a fight with the suspect inside the convenience store on Ritchie Highway, shortly before 2:30 a.m. The fight became physical outside the store and the suspect stabbed the victim. The victim told police the suspect then fled toward Church Street with a white male and white female. The victim sustained a minor stab wound to the upper part of his body, as well as a laceration to an extremity, and was treated at Harbor Hospital.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Derrick Joseph injured his shoulder in the second quarter of Towson's 27-24 loss to Maine on Saturday night, and he did not return to the game. But the senior return specialist could return in time for Saturday's 3:30 p.m. game at Johnny Unitas Stadium against Colonial Athletic Association opponent Stony Brook. Coach Rob Ambrose said Joseph, who ranks 22nd among all Football Championship Subdivision kick returners with a 25.6-yard average and has returned a school-record four kickoffs for touchdowns, suffered “a small strain” that does not require surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
You might suspect some strange jinx, or wonder if the third time's the harm. But the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is taking a rash of high-profile artist cancellations in stride. On July 29 came the news that actor/singer and star of Showtime's "Homeland" Mandy Patinkin had withdrawn from his BSO SuperPops program scheduled for January "due to a schedule conflict. " He would be replaced by "Seinfeld" veteran Jason Alexander. On Sept. 15, three days before the opening night of the season, the orchestra announced that Baltimore's own Hilary Hahn would not be on hand to play Beethoven's Violin Concerto as planned because the popular artist needed "to recover fully from a muscle strain.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 27, 2014
BLOOMINGTON, IND. -- Maryland quarterback C.J. Brown suffered a sprained left wrist during the Terps ' win over Indiana Saturday. Brown was injured during the first half and did not play in the second half. Terps coach Randy Edsall did not say whether he expects Brown to be available for Maryland's game vs. No. 22 Ohio State Saturday in College Park. Brown had a cast on his left wrist when he came out of the locker room for the second half. "I don't have any idea yet [on a timetable]
NEWS
By Steve Almond | September 24, 2014
While football remains far and away our country's most popular sport, in the past few years it has also become our most fraught, thanks to a steady drumbeat of stories underscoring its moral and physical hazards. The headlines dominating the news for the past few weeks have outlined cases of domestic violence by players against their girlfriends (the Ravens' Ray Rice among them) and children, and the acknowledgment by the NFL that one in three players is likely to suffer brain trauma.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
The Orioles' regular-season home finale Sunday afternoon ended with a whimper, a 3-2 loss to the Boston Red Sox. But they'll be back. For just the second time in Camden Yards' 23-season history, the Orioles ended their home schedule knowing for sure that they would return for a playoff game. Only in 1997 - the other time they were American League East division champions while playing at Camden Yards - did they know that the last regularly scheduled game in Baltimore wasn't their final one for the year.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2004
POOLESVILLE - Nam Gyal has work to do under the gaze of more than 1,000 Buddhas. The tall man in maroon robes takes his time in the still of night emptying 204 identical brass water bowls, one by one, into a plastic bucket - all the while praying, praying, praying. It is nearing 2 a.m., the beginning of a new day in an unbroken string of days: more than 19 years of nonstop prayer, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, conducted by members of Kunzang Palyul Choling, a Tibetan Buddhist temple in western Montgomery County.
NEWS
By Kara Eide and Kara Eide,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2003
It all started when Veronica Matricardi spun in her wheelchair in the middle of the stage and yelled, "I'm back, I'm back!" It was June and she had just seen a show at the Colonial Players theater house in Annapolis. Other audience members were filing out, but not Matricardi. She longed to experience the joy of being onstage again. She didn't have to wait long. Joe Thompson, director of Colonial Players' Cabaret for Kids, was there and invited Matricardi to join the cast. "My dream has been to become an actor again," said Matricardi, who in 1979 as a teen-ager performed in a Colonial Players production of Rumpelstiltskin before suffering a stroke the next year.
SPORTS
September 3, 2014
Weeks after falling awkwardly against the Dallas Cowboys and coughing up blood, Ravens starting cornerback Jimmy Smith proclaimed that he's made a full recovery. Smith suffered a chest contusion against the Cowboys and also had lung issues, but has been practicing since last week and says he's on track to play Sunday against the Cincinnati Bengals at M&T Bank Stadium. Smith said he won't need any extra padding to protect his chest. "I'm absolutely fine," said Smith, who's not listed on the first injury report released Wednesday.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Pastor Elbert Street noticed a small crack in the wall behind the pulpit at Grace Christian Baptist Church. It widened. Then a branch appeared. A cluster of leaves unfurled. That was when Street realized that something was growing between the walls of his East Baltimore church: an 8-foot-tall tree. The 79-year-old pastor and others took the wall apart, hacked down the tree and hauled away bags of branches and roots. The tree came back. They cut it down again. And then again.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.