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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | January 5, 2000
Old-fashioned mincemeat pie was the request of E. Tallant from Fayetteville, N.C. "My husband hasn't had one since he was a teen-ager and his grandmother made the pies," she wrote. Sandi Atkinson of Derwood sent in a recipe from "The 50 States Cookbook" (Consolidated Book Publishers, 1977) by the Culinary Arts Institute. "From Maine, in the New England section, on page 20, appears this recipe for mincemeat," she said. Mincemeat Makes enough for 2 pies 1/2 cup (about 4 ounces) ground suet 1 1/2 cups ground cooked beef 4 medium apples 1 cup packed brown sugar 1 cup apple cider 1/2 cup fruit jelly 1/2 cup seedless raisins, chopped 1/2 cup currants 2 tablespoons molasses 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon ground mace 1 tablespoon grated lemon peel 1 tablespoon lemon juice Mix suet and beef in a large, heavy skillet and set aside.
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BUSINESS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2012
Do I have to I clean up my hosta's leaves after they die? If the leaves are diseased, by all means remove them, since this is a basic principle of gardening sanitation and helps stop disease cycles. However, old collapsed leaves provide some winter protection around a plant's base as they decompose, and decayed leaves feed the plant - two good reasons to save yourself the trouble of removing them. Hosta leaves will virtually disappear by the time new leaves come up in the spring.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2008
In nightly invasions of my deck, an animal gets into my squirrel-proof bird feeder, scatters seed, pulls down my suet cage, takes the suet, digs in my flower pots, destroys the flowers, and lastly defecates on my deck. I'm sending a photo. Please advise! The scat photo suggests raccoon scat, though it could be opossum. Scat may change drastically depending on what the animal eats. Raccoons will repeatedly use the same site. They are extremely strong and can pull open even tightly wired suet cages.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2008
In nightly invasions of my deck, an animal gets into my squirrel-proof bird feeder, scatters seed, pulls down my suet cage, takes the suet, digs in my flower pots, destroys the flowers, and lastly defecates on my deck. I'm sending a photo. Please advise! The scat photo suggests raccoon scat, though it could be opossum. Scat may change drastically depending on what the animal eats. Raccoons will repeatedly use the same site. They are extremely strong and can pull open even tightly wired suet cages.
FEATURES
February 8, 1999
Not all birds fly south for the winter. Help out those you see by putting up a feeder. Then keep a list of all the kinds of birds that come to eat - during the winter and all year long!How to attract birdsIf you start feeding in winter, don't stop. It will stress out the birds. Some could even die.Keep feeders filled.Separate various foods. If possible, put each kind in a separate feeder so large birds don't crowd out smaller birds.Provide warm water for birds to drink.Clean feeders once a month with soap and water to prevent sick birds from infecting others.
BUSINESS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2012
Do I have to I clean up my hosta's leaves after they die? If the leaves are diseased, by all means remove them, since this is a basic principle of gardening sanitation and helps stop disease cycles. However, old collapsed leaves provide some winter protection around a plant's base as they decompose, and decayed leaves feed the plant - two good reasons to save yourself the trouble of removing them. Hosta leaves will virtually disappear by the time new leaves come up in the spring.
FEATURES
By Ann Egerton | January 5, 1994
* The presence of rats, raccoons and other varmints may make you reappraise your feed choices. Raccoons, for instance, love suet.* After it snows, sprinkle some seed on the ground so the birds can get to it. A flurry of bird activity around the feeder can be a sign of coming snow.* Try to put some water out and keep the ice broken in sub-freezing weather. The birds need water just as much as they need food.* Put animal hair, yarn, straw, loose wool near feeders for birds to use for nest-building this spring.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | November 27, 1994
As we await the early results of this year's firearms deer season, which began yesterday and will continue through Dec. 10, let's turn our attention to an abundant source of nature's beauty and enjoyment available to all Carroll County residents.Back-yard bird watching and feeding is enjoyed by hundreds of Marylanders.More than 20 species of birds visit our area of the state each winter. Some of the more common species you will find in your back yard include cardinals, blue jays, chickadees, titmice, sparrows, finches, grosbeaks, doves, nuthatches and woodpeckers.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 22, 2002
Christmas will soon be here. While watching "Scrooge," I noticed that they talk about plum pudding. What is it and how is it made? The weird thing about plum pudding is that it doesn't have any plums in it. Traditional English plum pudding is made with raisins, currants and (believe it or not) suet -- that's the solid white fat surrounding the kidneys and loins of animals like cattle and sheep, in case you didn't know. If you really want to make traditional plum pudding and can't find suet, try substituting lard or shortening.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | December 8, 1993
It's time to get a jolly good jump on holiday cooking, according to Dorothy McDonald of Kelso, Wash., who'd requested an English plum pudding recipe. "My mother had a recipe when she came from England more than 70 years ago, but it is lost and now the younger generation would like to try it," she wrote.Of the many responses, Chef Gilles Syglowski's choice came from Myra Devine of Baltimore, who also included a recipe for hard white sauce to go with it.Devine's Christmas plum pudding2 cup sifted flour1 teaspoon baking powder1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon of allspice1/4 teaspoon nutmeg1 cup fresh bread crumbs1 1/2 cups finely ground suet1 1/4 cups dark raisins1 cup currants1 1/4 cups golden raisins3/4 cup blanched, chopped almonds1/3 cup candied fruits (cherries or pineapple)
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN COLUMNIST | December 22, 2002
The birds and beasts deserve a holiday, too, writes environmentalist Bill McKibben in Hundred Dollar Holiday: The Case for a More Joyful Christmas -- "a day off from the hard work of finding food." So, on Christmas mornings he and his family take to the out-of-doors and scatter bread and seed. "It is a mark of the bond we share with the rest of creation," he writes. Holiday spirit or not, December is the busiest month for the sale of birding supplies: seed, feeders, houses -- and even birdbaths.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 22, 2002
Christmas will soon be here. While watching "Scrooge," I noticed that they talk about plum pudding. What is it and how is it made? The weird thing about plum pudding is that it doesn't have any plums in it. Traditional English plum pudding is made with raisins, currants and (believe it or not) suet -- that's the solid white fat surrounding the kidneys and loins of animals like cattle and sheep, in case you didn't know. If you really want to make traditional plum pudding and can't find suet, try substituting lard or shortening.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | January 5, 2000
Old-fashioned mincemeat pie was the request of E. Tallant from Fayetteville, N.C. "My husband hasn't had one since he was a teen-ager and his grandmother made the pies," she wrote. Sandi Atkinson of Derwood sent in a recipe from "The 50 States Cookbook" (Consolidated Book Publishers, 1977) by the Culinary Arts Institute. "From Maine, in the New England section, on page 20, appears this recipe for mincemeat," she said. Mincemeat Makes enough for 2 pies 1/2 cup (about 4 ounces) ground suet 1 1/2 cups ground cooked beef 4 medium apples 1 cup packed brown sugar 1 cup apple cider 1/2 cup fruit jelly 1/2 cup seedless raisins, chopped 1/2 cup currants 2 tablespoons molasses 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon ground mace 1 tablespoon grated lemon peel 1 tablespoon lemon juice Mix suet and beef in a large, heavy skillet and set aside.
FEATURES
February 8, 1999
Not all birds fly south for the winter. Help out those you see by putting up a feeder. Then keep a list of all the kinds of birds that come to eat - during the winter and all year long!How to attract birdsIf you start feeding in winter, don't stop. It will stress out the birds. Some could even die.Keep feeders filled.Separate various foods. If possible, put each kind in a separate feeder so large birds don't crowd out smaller birds.Provide warm water for birds to drink.Clean feeders once a month with soap and water to prevent sick birds from infecting others.
FEATURES
By Marty Hair, Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 6, 1998
BE A BIRD BUDDYEnjoy an orange or grapefruit, then make the rind into a bird feeder. First, ask an adult to cut the fruit in half. Eat the pulpy, sweet inside and save the rind, which is the fruit's tough outer cover. The hollow rind becomes a cup to hold bird food. Attached to a hanger made from string, the feeder can be suspended from a tree branch outdoors.Materials:Orange or grapefruit.Three pieces of heavy thread or string, all the same length, 12-20 inches.Adult help needed.1. Have an adult use a needle, skewer or other pointed object to poke three evenly spaced holes in the upper edge of the hollow rind.
NEWS
By Helen Chappell | March 6, 1996
OYSTERBACK, Md. -- Starting around Groundhog Day, Ferrus T. Buckett begins to build his eel pots. Ferrus, as we all know, is the world's oldest waterman, somewhere between 70 and death. But he still likes to put his pots overboard in March, when those eels begin to return to Chesapeake Bay from the Sargasso Sea.Ferrus sets up his wire mesh and his clamps by the kerosene furnace in the kitchen where it's warm, and works away through the cold weather. For entertainment, he keeps a couple of bird feeders and a suet bag where he can see them out the window.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN COLUMNIST | December 22, 2002
The birds and beasts deserve a holiday, too, writes environmentalist Bill McKibben in Hundred Dollar Holiday: The Case for a More Joyful Christmas -- "a day off from the hard work of finding food." So, on Christmas mornings he and his family take to the out-of-doors and scatter bread and seed. "It is a mark of the bond we share with the rest of creation," he writes. Holiday spirit or not, December is the busiest month for the sale of birding supplies: seed, feeders, houses -- and even birdbaths.
FEATURES
By Marty Hair, Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 6, 1998
BE A BIRD BUDDYEnjoy an orange or grapefruit, then make the rind into a bird feeder. First, ask an adult to cut the fruit in half. Eat the pulpy, sweet inside and save the rind, which is the fruit's tough outer cover. The hollow rind becomes a cup to hold bird food. Attached to a hanger made from string, the feeder can be suspended from a tree branch outdoors.Materials:Orange or grapefruit.Three pieces of heavy thread or string, all the same length, 12-20 inches.Adult help needed.1. Have an adult use a needle, skewer or other pointed object to poke three evenly spaced holes in the upper edge of the hollow rind.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | November 27, 1994
As we await the early results of this year's firearms deer season, which began yesterday and will continue through Dec. 10, let's turn our attention to an abundant source of nature's beauty and enjoyment available to all Carroll County residents.Back-yard bird watching and feeding is enjoyed by hundreds of Marylanders.More than 20 species of birds visit our area of the state each winter. Some of the more common species you will find in your back yard include cardinals, blue jays, chickadees, titmice, sparrows, finches, grosbeaks, doves, nuthatches and woodpeckers.
FEATURES
By Ann Egerton | January 5, 1994
* The presence of rats, raccoons and other varmints may make you reappraise your feed choices. Raccoons, for instance, love suet.* After it snows, sprinkle some seed on the ground so the birds can get to it. A flurry of bird activity around the feeder can be a sign of coming snow.* Try to put some water out and keep the ice broken in sub-freezing weather. The birds need water just as much as they need food.* Put animal hair, yarn, straw, loose wool near feeders for birds to use for nest-building this spring.
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