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By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
Pop jazz vocalist Suede tooted a bluesy horn, sang a smoky song and soon had the Severna Park High School Band yelling "Grammy! Grammy!"Suede, who graduated from Severna Park High in 1975, visited classes yesterday to deliver a simple message to the students: You can make your dreams come true."
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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | September 23, 2007
The setting: A sparkling, late summer day at MICA, where rearranging style margins is a varsity sport. Innovative MICA freshman Catherine Yard is in the running with black, cable-knit leg warmers worn on her arms, a black tank top and her superhero belted-and-laced suede boots worn over jeans. It's a look that works in the painting studio and on the street, and can stand up to the highest standards of art-school chic. Age: 18 Major: Illustration. Hometown: Trenton, N.J. Self-described look: "Gothic Lolita Punk or `GLP.
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FEATURES
By Lois Fenton | January 31, 1991
Q: Do only style-setter types wear suede shoes? Some stores refer to them as "nubuck." Is there a difference? What kind of clothes do they go with? Are they ever acceptable for business? Are some colors more acceptable than others?A: Elvis started a far-from-elegant fad with his "Blue Suede Shoes," (ruining suede for a whole generation of clothing-aware men). But suede shoes had been popular years before he shimmied and shook them into pop-chart culture in the 1960s. In the '20s, tanners, trying to sell some low-grade leathers, began sanding the hides to create a new leather look.
NEWS
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | September 3, 2006
If you focus only on color and pattern when furnishing, decorating or even remodeling, you'll be missing out on a powerful force for change: texture. In fabrics or floors, countertops or couches, walls or window treatments, texture is an often-overlooked quality that can complement color and pattern with shape, dimension, complexity and character. Texture comes into play when you want to refine or modify a material that appeals to you. For example, say you've settled on granite for your new kitchen countertops, and you've even found a favorite color and pattern.
FEATURES
By Lois Fenton and Lois Fenton,Contributing Writer | July 2, 1992
Q: My husband loves his dark gray suede hush puppies and insists that they can be worn in summer weather. He looks so hot and wintry and we have this argument. I know we women don't wear suede in the summer. Am I correct in telling him not to wear them in the summer even if he wears dark pants?A: Though women's suede shoes are widely considered part of that category of clothes reserved for wear between Labor Day and Memorial Day, men's and women's dress rules don't always coincide. On the other hand, if you are referring to a high desert boot style with a thick crepe sole, your argument is correct: the look is too hot for this time of the year.
FEATURES
September 13, 1996
The shoes on the Today front yesterday were incorrectly identified. The shoes are, (from top): Stuart Weitzman brown croc loafer, $195, at Hess Shoes. Red lizard by Pappagallo, $55, at Hecht's. Burgundy patent by Two Lips, $60, at Nordstrom. Mint suede by Steve Madden, $60, at Nordstrom. Black suede chunk loafer by Berne Mev, $110, at Joanna Gray. Red/black spectator by Valerie Stevens, $50, at Hecht's.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 9/13/96
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 12, 2003
County police are searching for an 18-year-old Severn man employed at Office Movers in Jessup who is considered to be a "critically missing person." Police said Nicholas David Tonic was last seen on Dec. 5 at 1700 Sea Pine Circle, where he lives with friends. Police said that about midnight, while his mother, Susan Tonic, was visiting the home, he told her he had to go out, but declined to say where he was going or why. Susan Tonic reported her son missing Wednesday after residents of Fruitful Court, a townhouse community in Millersville, found Nicholas Tonic's abandoned vehicle.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2001
NEW YORK - Clothes-minded men have plenty to look forward to this fall, judging from the hip and classy collections that menswear designers displayed at Fashion Week. Joseph Abboud dressed his models in gorgeous and slim-fitted four-button suits in such lovely, warm hues as olive green, walnut, heather gray and camel. Kenneth Cole unveiled beautifully cut suede pants and a long coat with fat, luxurious fur lapels. And BCBG Max Azria draped models in a line of jackets and coats with such clean, sleek lines and rich colors that they absolutely were to die for. However, if these designers are beyond your budget, have no fear.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2000
Suede for summer If you thought leather and suede were just for winter, Elie Tahari wants you to think again. For spring, the contemporary women's clothing designer has come up with several looks. She's paired soft glove-leather pants with a sheer, feminine tunic, and a geranium-pink suede halter with a floaty chiffon skirt. Now that's cool and hot. Scarfing up history History has never looked so ... pulled together. Get a little swatch of the last century with a scarf that tells something about time gone by. The 100-percent polyester scarves, crafted by Symphony Scarves in collaboration with the U.S. Historical Society, depict everything from fashions of the times ($18)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 9, 1993
HARBOR LIGHTSBruce Hornsby (RCA 66230)Whenever a pop artist leaves lots of soloing space in a song, it's usually because the melody doesn't have enough strength to stand on its own. So how is it that Bruce Hornsby's "Harbor Lights" boasts first-rate songwriting as well as exciting improvisational sections? Credit some of it to the company he keeps, as Hornsby trades licks with the likes of Branford Marsalis, Pat Metheny and Jerry Garcia (all of whom are expertly spurred on by drummer John Molo and bassist Jimmy Haslip)
NEWS
February 6, 2005
SUPERSTAR MAKEUP MAC Cosmetics is no stranger to drama, having made its name with dramatic colors, dramatic lashes and a dramatically large number of new collections a year. The newest is the Beauty Icon 2 series, honoring Diana Ross. (Liza Minnelli was the first honoree last year.) The collection, which hit stores recently, includes something for just about every aspect of the face, but check out these aptly named shades: Lipsticks in Miss Ross (mid-range pink frost), Stop! (bright coral luster)
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 12, 2003
County police are searching for an 18-year-old Severn man employed at Office Movers in Jessup who is considered to be a "critically missing person." Police said Nicholas David Tonic was last seen on Dec. 5 at 1700 Sea Pine Circle, where he lives with friends. Police said that about midnight, while his mother, Susan Tonic, was visiting the home, he told her he had to go out, but declined to say where he was going or why. Susan Tonic reported her son missing Wednesday after residents of Fruitful Court, a townhouse community in Millersville, found Nicholas Tonic's abandoned vehicle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | July 31, 2003
The band, which put out synth-pop classics like "Don't You Want Me" and "(Keep Feeling) Fascination," was one of the biggest and most influential British New Wave bands of the early 1980s - so don't pass up your chance to reminisce. Tickets are $25. The 9:30 Club is at 815 V St. N.W., Washington. For more information, call 202-393-0930, or visit www.930.com. Creepy weekend Ghoul's Night Out Fest III will haunt the Sidebar Tavern this weekend. Gloom-rock, goth, horror-rock, death-rock and other creepy genres will be showcased Saturday and Sunday when bands like Rock City Morgue and the Coffin Bangers take the stage.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | January 12, 2003
First came the shoulder pads, then the resurgence of Bon Jovi. Now the '80s comeback can be deemed complete with the reported revival of big hair. Don't worry about enduring Aqua Net-coated helmet head, however. Today's take on big hair is more tousled and fluid, less done. To get it, try products like Bumble and bumble's Thickening Shampoo and Thickening Conditioner followed by a shot or two of the company's Thickening Spray. The line makes fine hair fuller without sacrificing movement.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 24, 2002
A hide that isn't kept dry? Washable suede has its share of skeptics. But they're buying anyway. "I love the idea of being able to throw it in the wash and go," said Mary Conrad, an advertising consultant who was shopping at Nordstrom in Chicago recently. "Typically -- and I own a couple of real suede jackets -- you take it to the cleaners, it's gone for weeks, it's very expensive, and then it comes back and doesn't even feel the same." Washable suede -- and we're talking real leather, not Ultrasuede -- has been around for a few seasons at Eddie Bauer, said Engle Saez, senior vice president and chief marketing officer.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | October 13, 2002
Ninety years ago, a guy in Maine named Leon Leonwood Bean decided to improve on the typical hunting shoe by stitching a pair of waterproof shoe rubbers to leather tops made by a local cobbler. After testing them out himself in the fall of 1911, Bean sold 100 pairs the following spring, making sure to attach to each pair a tag guaranteeing the wearer's satisfaction 100 percent. The boots leaked, and 90 pairs were returned. But old Bean took out a loan and refined the shoe before returning the improved pairs to their purchasers.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | September 8, 2002
Say goodbye to the relaxed look. There's a new formality in men's clothes this fall, both for office wear and for evenings out. It means wearing one of the new patterned shirts and a coordinated tie instead of a golf shirt. Layering with a leather or suede sports coat to dress up khakis. And, yes, investing in a suit. Texture and pattern are big this fall, so that suit might be a pinstripe or tweed instead of gray flannel. The new suit has a Savile Row feel, but a leaner and sexier Italian-influenced silhouette -- fashionistas are labeling the look "Britalia."
FEATURES
February 6, 1991
Joe Loverde is an associate broker for Coldwell Banker and specializes in commercial property sales. Relaxation for Joe means traveling and playing golf. He admits that his game is still at the stage where he doesn't keep score, but knows he hasn't broken a hundred yet. He also plays racquetball and works out a couple of times a week.How would you describe your taste in clothing?Classic with particular attention to details that reflect a casual sophisticated look. I'm attracted to the Italian designers, because the cut makes the clothes fit better.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | September 8, 2002
Say goodbye to the relaxed look. There's a new formality in men's clothes this fall, both for office wear and for evenings out. It means wearing one of the new patterned shirts and a coordinated tie instead of a golf shirt. Layering with a leather or suede sports coat to dress up khakis. And, yes, investing in a suit. Texture and pattern are big this fall, so that suit might be a pinstripe or tweed instead of gray flannel. The new suit has a Savile Row feel, but a leaner and sexier Italian-influenced silhouette -- fashionistas are labeling the look "Britalia."
TOPIC
By Lisa Anderson | March 4, 2001
NEW YORK - A remarkable rise from Southern poor boy to president to reluctant retiree. A slew of shifty, shiftless siblings. Marital woes. Murky money. Strange company. Unbridled cupidity for everything from illicit sex to Spode china. And generally, a whole lot of lying and cheating going on. In a bit more than a month, the Clinton-Rodham clan of Arkansas-Washington-New York has managed to embrace all of these embarrassing elements, emerging as perhaps the most spectacularly dissolute and dysfunctional family since William Faulkner introduced the fictional and feral family Snopes of Yoknapatawpha County, Miss.
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