Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSudden Infant Death Syndrome
IN THE NEWS

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The state will consider adopting voluntary safety standards rather than an all-out ban on bumper pads that line the inside of cribs and have been determined a hazard to babies. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been pushing regulations that would make it the first state to ban the sale of bumper pads, but said Friday it will hold hearings to look at voluntary safety standards adopted by the manufacturers. Studies have found that the bumper pads, often included as part of bedding sets, can suffocate or strangle babies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
Despite several years of declines and a public health campaign, the number of babies in Baltimore who die while sleeping in a bed with a parent or caregiver remains a persistent concern, the city's health commissioner said. Dr. Oxiris Barbot said she is concerned about the number of "co-sleeping" deaths this year: There have been 11 confirmed cases of sleep-related infant deaths, a category that includes babies who were smothered by someone accidentally rolling over on them as well as incidents of sudden infant death syndrome or other unexplained causes of death.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
In the continued effort to reduce infant mortality in Baltimore, health officials and the Family League of Baltimore City have launched an effort to reduce secondhand smoke near babies and pregnant women. The campaign, called "Just Hold Off," is the second phase of the B'more for Healthy Babies program. The first phase, launched in August 2010, focused on safe sleep: Babies should sleep alone, on their backs in a crib. Officials are urging smokers to back away from pregnant women and babies in the home, vehicles, bus shelters and elsewhere.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The state will consider adopting voluntary safety standards rather than an all-out ban on bumper pads that line the inside of cribs and have been determined a hazard to babies. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been pushing regulations that would make it the first state to ban the sale of bumper pads, but said Friday it will hold hearings to look at voluntary safety standards adopted by the manufacturers. Studies have found that the bumper pads, often included as part of bedding sets, can suffocate or strangle babies.
NEWS
May 23, 2011
Finally, the description of Maryland as a "nanny state" could actually apply — and it's a good thing. Late last week, a state task force recommended that crib bumpers, the padded liners used on the inside of baby cribs, be declared a hazard. They have been associated with cases of asphyxiation where infants may have accidentally wedged their faces between the soft liner and crib mattress or become tangled with the strings that attach the bumpers to the crib slats. If Maryland Health and Mental Hygiene Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein accepts the proposed regulations, Maryland could be the first state in the nation to ban their sale.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
Of all the deaths that occur among infants, those caused by so-called crib bumpers — the padded, often brightly colored cushions that line the inside of babies' cribs — may be the easiest to prevent. Crib bumpers serve no real purpose other than the cosmetic, while in some case they can cause serious harm, even death. That's why Maryland health secretary Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein was right to accept an expert panel's recommendation on Tuesday to ban their sale in Maryland. Studies have shown that the pads, which are often marketed as a safety feature, have a negligible effect on reducing injuries caused by infants hitting their heads against the hard surfaces of their crib.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
After moving aggressively in recent years to make a dent in Maryland's stubbornly high infant mortality rate, city and state officials plan to announce Wednesday a significant drop, to the lowest level on record. Data from the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene show a drop to 6.7 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2010. That's a 7 percent drop from the year before, a 16 percent drop from two years before and the lowest rate since recording began in the 1940s. "It's definitely going in the right direction," said Frances B. Phillips, deputy secretary of the state health department.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
Despite several years of declines and a public health campaign, the number of babies in Baltimore who die while sleeping in a bed with a parent or caregiver remains a persistent concern, the city's health commissioner said. Dr. Oxiris Barbot said she is concerned about the number of "co-sleeping" deaths this year: There have been 11 confirmed cases of sleep-related infant deaths, a category that includes babies who were smothered by someone accidentally rolling over on them as well as incidents of sudden infant death syndrome or other unexplained causes of death.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | January 7, 1994
A study of premature babies has found that a declining heart rate is responsible for at least some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, challenging the widespread belief that SIDS occurs when an infant unaccountably stops breathing.Dr. Robert G. Meny, a pediatrician at the University of Maryland Medical Center, said the finding should push research in a new direction -- prompting doctors to explore why the heart rate slows and what might be done to prevent it."With these recorded deaths we find there was a heart rate problem before the babies stopped breathing," said Dr. Meany, director of clinical services at the university's SIDS Institute.
FEATURES
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1996
Dr. John L. Carroll remembers well the weekend he "reformed," the weekend he stopped using the word "prevention" in connection with Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.The pediatric pulmonologist at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center was at his computer, chatting on the Internet with parents who have lost babies to SIDS. In one of his exchanges, he mentioned "prevention." And all hell broke loose.For the next two days, inflamed SIDS parents from around the country waged a vehement campaign in protest of his vocabulary.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
In the continued effort to reduce infant mortality in Baltimore, health officials and the Family League of Baltimore City have launched an effort to reduce secondhand smoke near babies and pregnant women. The campaign, called "Just Hold Off," is the second phase of the B'more for Healthy Babies program. The first phase, launched in August 2010, focused on safe sleep: Babies should sleep alone, on their backs in a crib. Officials are urging smokers to back away from pregnant women and babies in the home, vehicles, bus shelters and elsewhere.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
Of all the deaths that occur among infants, those caused by so-called crib bumpers — the padded, often brightly colored cushions that line the inside of babies' cribs — may be the easiest to prevent. Crib bumpers serve no real purpose other than the cosmetic, while in some case they can cause serious harm, even death. That's why Maryland health secretary Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein was right to accept an expert panel's recommendation on Tuesday to ban their sale in Maryland. Studies have shown that the pads, which are often marketed as a safety feature, have a negligible effect on reducing injuries caused by infants hitting their heads against the hard surfaces of their crib.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
After moving aggressively in recent years to make a dent in Maryland's stubbornly high infant mortality rate, city and state officials plan to announce Wednesday a significant drop, to the lowest level on record. Data from the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene show a drop to 6.7 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2010. That's a 7 percent drop from the year before, a 16 percent drop from two years before and the lowest rate since recording began in the 1940s. "It's definitely going in the right direction," said Frances B. Phillips, deputy secretary of the state health department.
NEWS
May 23, 2011
Finally, the description of Maryland as a "nanny state" could actually apply — and it's a good thing. Late last week, a state task force recommended that crib bumpers, the padded liners used on the inside of baby cribs, be declared a hazard. They have been associated with cases of asphyxiation where infants may have accidentally wedged their faces between the soft liner and crib mattress or become tangled with the strings that attach the bumpers to the crib slats. If Maryland Health and Mental Hygiene Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein accepts the proposed regulations, Maryland could be the first state in the nation to ban their sale.
FEATURES
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1996
Dr. John L. Carroll remembers well the weekend he "reformed," the weekend he stopped using the word "prevention" in connection with Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.The pediatric pulmonologist at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center was at his computer, chatting on the Internet with parents who have lost babies to SIDS. In one of his exchanges, he mentioned "prevention." And all hell broke loose.For the next two days, inflamed SIDS parents from around the country waged a vehement campaign in protest of his vocabulary.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | January 7, 1994
A study of premature babies has found that a declining heart rate is responsible for at least some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, challenging the widespread belief that SIDS occurs when an infant unaccountably stops breathing.Dr. Robert G. Meny, a pediatrician at the University of Maryland Medical Center, said the finding should push research in a new direction -- prompting doctors to explore why the heart rate slows and what might be done to prevent it."With these recorded deaths we find there was a heart rate problem before the babies stopped breathing," said Dr. Meany, director of clinical services at the university's SIDS Institute.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | April 3, 1993
As the Patriot pulled into Pennsylvania Station yesterday morning, about a dozen children and adults and a man in a bird suit stood on the train platform wearing red plastic clown noses."
NEWS
December 11, 2003
On December 7, 2003, EVAN WILLIAM RUSSELL, cherished son of Michele and William J. Russell. Loving brother of Emma Nicole Russell and dear grandson of Everett and Betty Livingston, Patrick Russell and Pamela Russell-Pugh. Also survived by many loving family members and friends Relatives and friends may call at the family owned Ambrose Funeral Home Inc., 1328 Sulphur Spring Road, on Thursday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial to be celebrated Friday 10 A.M. at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 65 Sacred Heart Lane, Reisterstown.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.